Results for 'Non-existence'

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  1. Non-Existent Objects and Epistemological Ontology.William J. Rapaport - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 25 (1):61-95.
    This essay examines the role of non-existent objects in "epistemological ontology" — the study of the entities that make thinking possible. An earlier revision of Meinong's Theory of Objects is reviewed, Meinong's notions of Quasisein and Außersein are discussed, and a theory of Meinongian objects as "combinatorially possible" entities is presented.
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  2.  55
    The Non-Existence of God.Nicholas Everitt - 2003 - Routledge London.
    Is it possible to prove or disprove God's existence? Arguments for the existence of God have taken many different forms over the centuries: in The Non-Existence of God, Nicholas Everitt considers all of the arguments and examines the role that reason and knowledge play in the debate over God's existence. He draws on recent scientific disputes over neo-Darwinism, the implication of 'big bang' cosmology, and the temporal and spatial size of the universe; and discusses some of (...)
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  3.  60
    Non-Existent Objects and Epistemological Ontology.William J. Rapaport - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 25 (1):61-95.
    This essay examines the role of non-existent objects in "epistemological ontology" — the study of the entities that make thinking possible. An earlier revision of Meinong's Theory of Objects is reviewed, Meinong's notions of Quasisein and Außersein are discussed, and a theory of Meinongian objects as "combinatorially possible" entities is presented.
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  4. The Non-Existence of God.Nicholas Everitt - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):692-693.
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  5. Past and Future Non-Existence.Jens Johansson - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):51-64.
    According to the “deprivation approach,” a person’s death is bad for her to the extent that it deprives her of goods. This approach faces the Lucretian problem that prenatal non-existence deprives us of goods just as much as death does, but does not seem bad at all. The two most prominent responses to this challenge—one of which is provided by Frederik Kaufman (inspired by Thomas Nagel) and the other by Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer—claim that prenatal non-existence (...)
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  6. The Non-Existence of God.Nicholas Everitt - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):127-129.
     
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  7.  62
    Prenatal and Posthumous Non-Existence: A Reply to Johansson.John Martin Fischer & Anthony L. Brueckner - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (1):1-9.
    We have argued that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous non-existence insofar as this asymmetry is a special case of a more general (and arguably rational) asymmetry in our attitudes toward past and future pleasures. Here we respond to an interesting critique of our view by Jens Johansson. We contend that his critique involves a crucial and illicit switch in temporal perspectives in the process of considering modal claims (sending us to other possible worlds).
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  8.  18
    Non-Existent Objects.Kit Fine - 1984 - Philosophical Studies 45 (1):95-142.
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  9.  39
    Characterizing Non-Existents.Frederick Kroon - 1996 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 51 (1):163-193.
    Consider predicates like 'is a fictional character' and 'is a mythical object'. Since their ascription entails a corresponding Negative Existential claim, call these 'NE-characterizing predicates'. Objectualists such as Parsons, Sylvan, van Inwagen, and Zalta think that NE-characterizing properties are genuine properties of genuinely non-existent objects. But how, then, to make room for statements like 'Vulcan is a failed posit' and 'that little green man is a trick of the light'? The predicates involved seem equally NE-characterizing yet on the surface fail (...)
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  10.  44
    “The (Non)-Existence of Molinist Counterfactuals”.William Hasker - 2011 - In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 25--37.
  11.  27
    The Non-Existence of the Real World by Jan Westerhoff.Ricki Bliss - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (3):1-7.
    Commitment to the idea that there is something real can be found in a variety of different places, perhaps the most obvious expressions of which are in the ideas that there is a real world outside our heads, an external world, and that we ourselves are surely real. In addition to these somewhat quotidian commitments, philosophers also find homes for the real in more abstract, theoretical locations--chief amongst them being that the world contains something fundamental, the reals, and that there (...)
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  12. Creating Non-Existents.Graham Priest - 2011 - In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag.
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  13. The Non-Existence of Ontological Categories: A Defence of Lowe.J. T. M. Miller - 2016 - Metaphysica 17 (2).
    This paper addresses the ontological status of the ontological categories as defended within E.J. Lowe’s four-category ontology (kinds, objects, properties/relations, and modes). I consider the arguments in Griffith (2015. “Do Ontological Categories Exist?” Metaphysica 16 (1):25–35) against Lowe’s claim that ontological categories do not exist, and argue that Griffith’s objections to Lowe do not work once we fully take advantage of ontological resources available within Lowe’s four-category ontology. I then argue that the claim that ontological categories do not exist has (...)
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  14.  98
    The Non-Existence of a Principle of Natural Selection.Abner Shimony - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):255-273.
    The theory of natural selection is a rich systematization of biological knowledge without a first principle. When formulations of a proposed principle of natural selection are examined carefully, each is seen to be exhaustively analyzable into a proposition about sources of fitness and a proposition about consequences of fitness. But whenever the fitness of an organic variety is well defined in a given biological situation, its sources are local contingencies together with the background of laws from disciplines other than the (...)
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  15.  98
    Hardcore Actualism and Possible Non‐Existence.Samuel Kimpton‐Nye - 2018 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):122-131.
    According to hardcore actualism (HA), all modal truths are grounded in the concrete constituents of the actual world. In this paper, I discuss some problems faced by HA when it comes to accounting for certain alleged possibilities of non‐existence. I focus particular attention on Leech (2017)'s dilemma for HA, according to which HA must either sacrifice extensional correctness or admit mere possibilia. I propose a solution to Leech's dilemma, which relies on a distinction between weak and strong possibility. It (...)
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  16.  75
    On Preferring God's Non-Existence.Klaas J. Kraay & Chris Dragos - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):157-178.
    For many centuries, philosophers have debated this question: “Does God exist?” Surprisingly, they have paid rather less attention to this distinct – but also very important – question: “Would God’s existence be a good thing?” The latter is an axiological question about the difference in value that God’s existence would make (or does make) in the actual world. Perhaps the most natural position to take, whether or not one believes in God, is to hold that it would be (...)
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  17.  14
    The Non-Existence of Institutional Facts.Friedrich Christoph Dörge & Matthias Holweger - 2021 - Synthese 199: 4953–4974.
    That certain paper bills have monetary value, that Vladimir Putin is the president of Russia, and that Prince Philip is the husband of Queen Elizabeth II: such facts are commonly called ‘institutional facts’. IFF are, by definition, facts that exist by virtue of collective recognition. The standard view or tacit belief is that such facts really exist. In this paper we argue, however, that they really do not—they really are just well-established illusions. We confront realism about IFF with six criteria (...)
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  18. The Problem of Non-Existents.Kit Fine - 1982 - Topoi 1 (1-2):97-140.
  19.  61
    Existence, Non-Existence, and Predication.Herbert Hochberg - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 25 (1):235-267.
    Two connected themes have been at the core of the old perplexity regarding thinking and speaking about non-existent objects. One involves a question of reference. Can we refer to non-existent objects without, thereby, recognizing, in some sense, non-existent entities as objects of reference? The other involves a question about existence. Is existence a property representable by a predicate in a logically adequate symbohsm? It is argued (1) that existence is not to be construed as an attribute represented (...)
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  20. On Geometric Objects, the Non-Existence of a Gravitational Stress-Energy Tensor, and the Uniqueness of the Einstein Field Equation.Erik Curiel - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 66:90-102.
    The question of the existence of gravitational stress-energy in general relativity has exercised investigators in the field since the inception of the theory. Folklore has it that no adequate definition of a localized gravitational stress-energetic quantity can be given. Most arguments to that effect invoke one version or another of the Principle of Equivalence. I argue that not only are such arguments of necessity vague and hand-waving but, worse, are beside the point and do not address the heart of (...)
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  21. The Existence (and Non-Existence) of Abstract Objects.Richard Heck - 2011 - In Frege's Theorem. Oxford University Press.
    This paper is concerned with neo-Fregean accounts of reference to abstract objects. It develops an objection to the most familiar such accounts, due to Bob Hale and Crispin Wright, based upon what I call the 'proliferation problem': Hale and Wright's account makes reference to abstract objects seem too easy, as is shown by the fact that any equivalence relation seems as good as any other. The paper then develops a response to this objection, and offers an account of what it (...)
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  22.  22
    The Non-Existing Object Revisited: Meinong as the Link Between Husserl and Russell?Peter Andras Varga - 2016 - In Marian David & Mauro Antonelli (eds.), Existence, Fiction, Assumption: Meinongian Themes and the History of Austrian Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 27-58.
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  23.  10
    Non-Existent Things as Subject of Inference in Bhāviveka’s Dacheng Zhangzhen Lun.Lai Yan Fong - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (4):795-810.
    This paper is a preliminary study of Bhāviveka’s Svātantrika-Mādhyamika justifications for taking non-existent things as the subject of an inference, based on his Dacheng Zhangzhen Lun. Bhāviveka’s treatment of inference is similar to that of Dignāga in that the subject is required to be existent. Bhāviveka also holds that, in a conventional sense, words refer to universals and to the existent entities that possess them, while the two are cognised together. However, in his inference for the unreality of unconditioned things, (...)
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  24. Fictional Objects, Non-Existence, and the Principle of Characterization.Andrea Sauchelli - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 159 (1):139-146.
    I advance an objection to Graham Priest’s account of fictional entities as nonexistent objects. According to Priest, fictional characters do not have, in our world, the properties they are represented as having; for example, the property of being a bank clerk is possessed by Joseph K. not in our world but in other worlds. Priest claims that, in this way, his theory can include an unrestricted principle of characterization for objects. Now, some representational properties attributed to fictional characters, a kind (...)
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  25.  26
    Non-Existence Does Not Exist.R. Routley - 1970 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 11 (3):289-320.
  26. On the Non-Existence of Parallel Universes in Chemistry.Richard F. W. Bader - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):11-37.
    This treatise presents thoughts on the divide that exists in chemistry between those who seek their understanding within a universe wherein the laws of physics apply and those who prefer alternative universes wherein the laws are suspended or ‘bent’ to suit preconceived ideas. The former approach is embodied in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), a theory based upon the properties of a system’s observable distribution of charge. Science is experimental observation followed by appeal to theory that, upon (...)
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  27.  13
    Empty Representations: Reference and Non-Existence.Manuel García-Carpintero & Genoveva Martí (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    The contents of linguistic and mental representations may seem to be individuated by what they are about. But a problem arises with regard to representation of the non-existent - words and thoughts that are about things that don't exist. Fourteen new essays get to grips with this much-debated problem.
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  28. The Non-Existence of “Inference Claims”.Gilbert Edward Plumer - 2019 - In Bart Garssen, David Godden, Gordon R. Mitchell & Jean H. M. Wagemans (eds.), Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation (ISSA). [Amsterdam, July 3-6, 2018.]. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Sic Sat. pp. 913-918.
    Some believe that all arguments make an implicit “inference claim” that the conclusion is inferable from the premises (e.g., Bermejo-Luque, Grennan, the Groarkes, Hitchcock, Scriven). I try to show that this is confused. An act of arguing arises because an inference can be attributed to us, not a meta-level “inference claim” that would make the argument self-referential and regressive. I develop six (other) possible explanations of the popularity of the doctrine that similarly identify confusions.
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  29. Quantification and Non-Existent Objects.Thomas Hofweber - 2000 - In T. Hofweber & A. Everett (eds.), Empty Names, Fiction, and the Puzzles of Non-Existence. CSLI Publications.
  30.  28
    Who’s Afraid of Non-Existent Manifestations?Michele Paolini Paoletti - 2016 - In Francesco F. Calemi (ed.), Metaphysics and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honour of David Malet Armstrong. De Gruyter. pp. 193-206.
    I shall defend in this paper the thesis that, if there are irreducible powers such as the power to produce a certain object (generative powers), then there are objects that do not exist and they are part of the fundamental level of the universe. Thus, generative powers come together with Meinongianism. After having clarified my argument, I shall examine and criticize Armstrong (1997)’s attempt to reduce powers to other sorts of entities. Finally, I shall deal with five accounts of generative (...)
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  31. Beyond Existence and Non-Existence.Lilian Alweiss - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):448-469.
    When Husserl speaks of the so-called ?transcendental reduction? or ?phenomenological epoch?? many believe that he is eschewing the question of truth or existence. Two reasons are given for this: First, Husserl explicitly states that when we perform the reduction, we should no longer naively ?accept [the world] as it presents itself to me as factually existing? (Id I ?30, p. 53) and should suspend our judgement with regard to ?the positing of its actual being? (Id I ?88, p. 182). (...)
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  32.  30
    Non-Existent Objects: Recent Work on Brentano and Meinong.Reinhardt Grossmann - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1):17 - 32.
  33. What is the Problem of Non-Existence?Tim Crane - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (3):417-434.
    It is widely held that there is a problem of talking about or otherwise representing things that not exist. But what exactly is this problem? This paper presents a formulation of the problem in terms of the conflict between the fact that there are truths about non-existent things and the fact that truths must be answerable to reality, how things are. Given this, the problem of singular negative existential statements is no longer the central or most difficult aspect of the (...)
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  34.  6
    Existence, Non-Existence, and Predication.Herbert Hochberg - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 25 (1):235-267.
    Two connected themes have been at the core of the old perplexity regarding thinking and speaking about non-existent objects. One involves a question of reference. Can we refer to non-existent objects without, thereby, recognizing, in some sense, non-existent entities as objects of reference? The other involves a question about existence. Is existence a property representable by a predicate in a logically adequate symbohsm? It is argued that existence is not to be construed as an attribute represented by (...)
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  35. The Non-Existence of Time.C. J. Ducasse - 1925 - Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):16-20.
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  36.  32
    Non-Existent Objects and Their Properties in Udayana's Ātmatattvaviveka.David Nowakowski - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (3):762-782.
    The Nyāya philosopher Udayana devotes the first chapter of his Ātmatattvaviveka to refuting the Buddhist thesis of universal momentariness—the view that nothing which exists can persist through time—and to establishing the contrary view that things can and do persist. In the course of his critique of the Buddhists' "inference from existence" which purports to establish the momentariness thesis, Udayana is forced to consider the problem of how, if at all, it is possible to meaningfully and reliably think and talk (...)
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  37.  59
    The Non-Existence of Matter.C. E. M. Joad - 1928 - Philosophy 3 (12):495-.
    It is probably true to say that the majority of philosophers have considered the universe to be mental. If the universe is really mental, it follows that matter cannot be quite real, and many philosophers have in fact brought forward cogent reasons for regarding matter as in some sense illusory. Those who hold this view are called Idealists. Idealism has historically assumed a number of different forms, between some of which there is little in common, but all forms of Idealism (...)
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  38. Non-Existence and Universals.Eric Toms - 1956 - Philosophical Quarterly 6 (23):136-144.
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  39.  69
    The Non-Existent God: Transcendence, Humanity, and Ethics in the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas.Donald L. Turner & Ford Turrell - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (3-4):375 - 382.
    This paper considers three essential gestures in Levinas’s theology, highlighting in each case how Levinas’s thinking allows him to either incorporate or sidestep some of the fiercest modern criticisms of traditional theism. First, we present Levinas’s vision of divine transcendence, outlining his ontological atheism and explaining how this obviates proving the existence of God and avoids the tangles of traditional theodicy. Second, we describe Levinas’s idea of the trace, showing how a nonexistent God still leaves its mark in the (...)
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  40. Critical Review of Parsons' Non-Existent Objects. [REVIEW]Kit Fine - 1984 - Philosophical Studies 45 (1):95-142.
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  41. A Non-Existent Performative Argument.Benoit de Cornulier - 1974 - Foundations of Language 11 (3):413-414.
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  42. Frege on Existence and Non‐Existence.Karen Green - 2015 - Theoria 81 (4):293-310.
    Despite its importance for early analytic philosophy, Gottlob Frege's account of existence statements, according to which they classify concepts, has been thought to succumb to a number of well-worn criticisms. This article does two things. First, it argues that, by remaining faithful to the letter of Frege's claim that concepts are functions, the Fregean account can be saved from many of the standard criticisms. Second, it examines the problem that Frege's account fails to generalize to cases which involve definite (...)
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  43.  4
    The Non-Existent Objects of Belief.Tess Dewhurst - 2020 - South African Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):371-375.
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  44. Non-Existence and Predication.Rudolf Haller (ed.) - 1985 - Rodopi.
     
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  45. The Non-Existence of Matter.A. S. Hawkesworth - 1903 - Philosophical Review 12:345.
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  46. The Non-Existence of God.Howard R. Burkle - 1969 - Herder & Herder.
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  47. Non-Existence and Predication. Hrsg. R. Haller. [REVIEW]E. Dölling - 1988 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 36 (6):574.
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  48.  26
    The Non-Existence of God. [REVIEW]Glenn Tiller - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (4):777-779.
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    The Non-Existence of God. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):553-554.
    Burkle examines various philosophical suggestions that God is not an existing reality. Hegel, Sartre, and Henry Dumery are selected as representative of the position Burkle calls "antitheism." What is common to all of the antitheists is that objective existence is denied to God, or that the category of existence itself is an ambiguous one when ascribed to God. Burkle argues that one cannot divorce the concept of human existence from a concept of the "other," or God, or (...)
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  50.  18
    "The Non-Existence of God: Anti-Theism From Hegel to Duméry," by Howard R. Burkle. [REVIEW]Vernon J. Bourke - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 48 (1):107-107.
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