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Noël Carroll [192]Noel Edward Carroll [1]
  1. Moderate moralism.Noël Carroll - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):223-238.
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  2. The Philosophy of Horror: Or, Paradoxes of the Heart.Noel Carroll - 1990 - Routledge.
    Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can find pleasure in having (...)
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  3. The wheel of virtue: Art, literature, and moral knowledge.Noel Carroll - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):3–26.
    In this essay, then, I would like to address what I believe are the most compelling epistemic arguments against the notion that literature (and art more broadly) can function as an instrument of education and a source of knowledge.
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  4. Art and ethical criticism: An overview of recent directions of research.Noël Carroll - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):350-387.
  5. The Philosophy of Horror or Paradoxes of the Heart.Noel Carroll - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):519.
    Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can find pleasure in having (...)
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  6. A Philosophy of Mass Art.Noël Carroll - 1997 - Clarendon Press.
    Few today can escape exposure to mass art. Nevertheless, despite the fact that mass art provides the primary source of aesthetic experience for the majority of people, mass art is a topic that has been neglected by analytic philosophers of art. The Philosophy of Mass Art addresses that lacuna. It shows why philosophers have previously resisted and/or misunderstood mass art and it develops new frameworks for understanding mass art in relation to the emotions, morality, and ideology.
  7.  64
    Moderate Moralism.Noël Carroll - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):223-238.
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  8.  38
    Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Noel Carroll - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):93-99.
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  9. Humour: A Very Short Introduction.Noël Carroll - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Humour is a universal feature of human life. In this Very Short Introduction Noel Carroll considers the nature and value of humour, from its leading theories and its relation to emotion and cognition, to ethical questions of its morality and its significance in shaping society.
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  10. Art, narrative, and moral understanding.Noël Carroll - 1998 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Cambridge University Press. pp. 126--60.
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  11. Ethics and Comic Amusement.Noël Carroll - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
    This article explores several views on the relation of humour, especially tendentious humour, to morality, including comic amoralism, comic ethicism, comic immoralism, and moderate comic moralism. The essay concludes by defending moderate comic moralism.
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  12. On Criticism.Noël Carroll - 2008 - Routledge.
    Drawing on his knowledge of the worlds of art, criticism, and philosophy, Noèel Carroll argues that appraisal and evaluation of art are an indispensable part of the conversation of life.
  13. Art, intention, and conversation.Noël Carroll - 1992 - In Gary Iseminger (ed.), Intention and Interpretation. Temple University Press. pp. 97--131.
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  14. Art Appreciation.Noël Carroll - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (4):1-14.
    There seem to be at least two leading conceptions of art appreciation. The first, and by far the most popular, it seems to me, regards “appreciation” as a synonym for “approbation,” which itself can be a synonym for affection or even love. “To appreciate,” in this sense, is “to cherish.” This is the notion of appreciation that most plain speakers have in mind when they say things such as “I appreciate what you’ve done with your garden.” They mean “I like (...)
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  15. A Philosophy of Mass Art.Noël Carroll - 1998 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (1):182-183.
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  16. Narrative closure.Noël Carroll - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):1 - 15.
    In this article, “Narrative Closure,” a theory of the nature of narrative closure is developed. Narrative closure is identified as the phenomenological feeling of finality that is generated when all the questions saliently posed by the narrative are answered. The article also includes a discussion of the intelligibility of attributing questions to narratives as well as a discussion of the mechanisms that achieve this. The article concludes by addressing certain recent criticisms of the view of narrative expounded by this article.
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  17. Historical narratives and the philosophy of art.Noel Carroll - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (3):313-326.
  18. Recent Approaches to Aesthetic Experience.Noël Carroll - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):165-177.
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  19.  29
    On Criticism.Noël Carroll - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (4):421-423.
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  20. Aesthetic experience revisited.Noël Carroll - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):145-168.
    In this article I divide theories of aesthetic experience into three sorts: the affectoriented approach, the axiologically oriented approach, and the content-oriented approach. I then go on to defend a version of the content-oriented approach.
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  21. Moderate moralism versus moderate autonomism.Noel Carroll - 1998 - British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (4):419-424.
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  22.  39
    Pursuits of Happiness: The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage.Noel Carroll - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (1):103-106.
  23. Defending the Content Approach to Aesthetic Experience.Noël Carroll - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):171-188.
    This article defends the content approach to aesthetic experience. It begins by sketching this approach to aesthetic experience. It then rehearses certain recent criticisms of the view by Alan Goldman and attempts to rebut them. One of those criticisms raises a long-standing concern about the author's account that has recently been called the “qua” problem. The article concludes by putting this issue to rest.
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  24. Hume's standard of taste.Noel Carroll - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):181-194.
  25.  35
    Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective.Noël Carroll - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):297-300.
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  26.  87
    On being moved by nature: between religion and natural history.Noël Carroll - 1993 - In . Cambridge University Press. pp. 244-266.
    INTRODUCTIONFor the last two and a half decades – perhaps spurred onwards by R. W. Hepburn's seminal, wonderfully sensitive and astute essay “Contemporary Aesthetics and the Neglect of Natural Beauty” – philosophical interest in the aesthetic appreciation of nature has been gaining momentum. One of the most coherent, powerfully argued, thorough, and philosophically compelling theories to emerge from this evolving arena of debate has been developed over a series of articles by Allen Carlson. The sophistication of Carlson's approach – especially (...)
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  27.  67
    I’m Only Kidding: On Racist and Ethnic Jokes.Noël Carroll - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):534-546.
    Toward the end of his book Jokes, perhaps the best known philosophical treatment of the subject, Ted Cohen includes a notorious joke about a group of young Black men who are deterred from committing a gang rape by being thrown a basketball. This is a joke that perplexes Cohen and that he admits plays into stereotypes that presuppose the mindless obsession of Black youths with basketball as well as their unbridled sexuality. He agrees that the joke is morally bad and (...)
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  28.  31
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature.Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) - 2015 - New York: Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature_ is an in-depth examination of literature through a philosophical lens, written by distinguished figures across the major divisions of philosophy. Its 40 newly-commissioned essays are divided into six sections: historical foundations what is literature? aesthetics & appreciation meaning & interpretation metaphysics & epistemology ethics & political theory _The Companion_ opens with a comprehensive historical overview of the philosophy of literature, including chapters on the study’s ancient origins up to the 18 th -20 th (...)
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  29.  30
    Interpretation and Intention: The Debate between Hypothetical and Actual Intentionalism.Noël Carroll - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (1-2):75-95.
    Regarded for decades as a fallacy, intentionalist interpretation is beginning to attract a following among philosophers of art. Intentionalism is the doctrine that the actual intentions of artists are relevant to the interpretation of the artworks they create – just as actual intentions are relevant to the interpretation of the everyday words and deeds of other people. Although there are several forms of actual intentionalism, I defend the form known as modest actual intentionalism, which holds that the correct interpretation of (...)
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  30. Horror and humor.Noël Carroll - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):145-160.
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  31. Art and Mood.Noël Carroll - 2003 - The Monist 86 (4):521-555.
    In recent years, the philosophy of art has profited enormously by applying to the study of art insights derived from the philosophies of mind and language, naturalized epistemology, psychology, evolutionary theory, and cognitive science. A case in point: the discussion of the nature of picturing and pictorial perception has obviously benefited from the influence of perceptual psychology and cognitive studies. Likewise, the theorization of art in relation to the emotions has also exploited contemporary advances in adjacent areas of inquiry.
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  32.  15
    Art and Mood.Noël Carroll - 2003 - The Monist 86 (4):521-555.
    In recent years, the philosophy of art has profited enormously by applying to the study of art insights derived from the philosophies of mind and language, naturalized epistemology, psychology, evolutionary theory, and cognitive science. A case in point: the discussion of the nature of picturing and pictorial perception has obviously benefited from the influence of perceptual psychology and cognitive studies. Likewise, the theorization of art in relation to the emotions has also exploited contemporary advances in adjacent areas of inquiry.
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  33. Art, Practice, and Narrative.Noël Carroll - 1988 - The Monist 71 (2):140-156.
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  34.  95
    Forget Taste.Noël Carroll - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 56 (1):1-27.
    “Forget Taste” rejects the classical notion of taste as a viable concept for the exercise of critical evaluation and proposes an alternative approach to critical evaluation based crucially on the idea of the constitutive purpose of the artwork. The goal of this paper is to advance an approach—which I call the purpose-driven approach—to the critical evaluation of artworks that develops from and refines the views of art evaluation presented in my previous work. This approach, in virtue of its focus on (...)
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  35. On Jokes.Noël Carroll - 1991 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):280-301.
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  36. The Power of Movies.Noël Carroll - 2004 - In Peter Lamarque & Stein Haugom Olsen (eds.), Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: The Analytic Tradition: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 21.
     
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  37. Art in three dimensions.Noël Carroll - 2010 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Art in Three Dimensions is a collection of essays by one of the most eminent figures in philosophy of art.
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  38. Interpretation, History and Narrative.Noël Carroll - 1990 - The Monist 73 (2):134-166.
    At present, one of the most recurrent views in the philosophy of history claims that historical writing is interpretive and that a primary form that this interpretation takes is narration. Furthermore, narration, according to this approach, is thought to possess an inevitably fictional element, viz., a plot, and, in this regard, the work of the narrative historian is said to be more like that of the imaginative writer than has been admitted heretofore. The upshot of this philosophically, moreover, is the (...)
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  39.  74
    Theories of Art Today.Noel Carroll (ed.) - 2000 - University of Wisconsin Press.
    What is art? The philosophers and historians contributing to this volume address the assertion that the term "art" no longer holds meaning.
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  40.  69
    Literature, the Emotions, and Learning.Noël Carroll - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):1-18.
    The subject of this essay is the way in which literature, by engaging our emotions, contributes to our emotional intelligence. In reading works of literature, we are almost constantly called upon—or mandated—to mobilize our emotions in the process of understanding the text. In this way, the literary text ineludibly guides us through a rehearsal of the pertinent portions of our affective repertoire.For example, we do not fully understand Iago unless we despise him, nor do we understand Dorothea Brooke adequately without (...)
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  41. The nature of horror.Noël Carroll - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):51-59.
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  42.  20
    Timings: Notes on Stand-up Comedy.Noël Carroll - 2020 - The Philosophy of Humor Yearbook 1 (1):3-15.
    This article attempts to provide a basic characterization of stand-up comedy—that is, a minimal portrait of what comes to mind when one learns that one is about to see a stand-up comic. To that end, the focus will be primarily on the relation of stand-up comedy in terms of themes of temporality, including the structure of stand-up comedy, its rhythm, its delivery, and its contemporaneity.
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  43. Non-perceptual aesthetic properties: Comments for James Shelley.Noël Carroll - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):413-423.
    James Shelley has raised the important question of whether it is possible to have aesthetic experiences of imperceptible artworks. This issue is important for determining whether or not the aesthetic theory of art can deal with certain cases of conceptual art. Shelley has argued that it is possible to have aesthetic experiences of imperceptibilia. And in this article, I concur with him, though for reasons different from his. Nevertheless, I go on to argue that this still fails to vindicate the (...)
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  44.  56
    On some affective relations between audiences and the characters in popular fictions.Noël Carroll - 2011 - In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 162.
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  45.  76
    Two Approaches to Aesthetic Experience.Noël Carroll - 2023 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 57 (4):1-17.
    Abstract:This article examines two approaches to aesthetic experience, especially with respect to the practice of art criticism. The two approaches are (1) aesthetic experience construed as experience necessarily valued for its own sake and (2) aesthetic experience characterized in terms of its content. In this article, the content approach is defended as the one most suitable to the practice of art criticism.
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  46. Humour.Noel Carroll - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  47.  61
    Authority and Freedom: A Defense of Art.Noël Carroll - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayac070.
    For roughly two centuries, there has been an ongoing rivalry between two views of art. On the one hand, there is the claim—sometimes heralded by the slogan ‘art.
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  48. The intentional fallacy: Defending myself.Noel Carroll - 1997 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):305-309.
  49. A Taxonomy of Disgust in Art.Noël Carroll & Filippo Contesi - 2019 - In Kevin Tavin, Mira Kallio-Tavin & Max Ryynänen (eds.), Art, Excess, and Education. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 21–38.
    Disgust has been a perennial feature of art from medieval visions of hell to postmodern travesties. The purpose of this chapter is to chart various ways in which disgust functions in artworks both in terms of content and style, canvassing cases in which the content and/or style is literally disgusting in contrast to cases where the disgust serves to characterize the content, often for moral or political or broader cultural purposes.
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  50. A Paradox of the Heart: A Response to Alex Neill.Noel Carroll - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 65 (1/2):67 - 74.
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