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Nicola S. Clayton [10]Nicola Susan Clayton [1]
  1. Dimensions of Animal Consciousness.Jonathan Birch, Alexandra K. Schnell & Nicola S. Clayton - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (10):789-801.
    How does consciousness vary across the animal kingdom? Are some animals ‘more conscious’ than others? This article presents a multidimensional framework for understanding interspecies variation in states of consciousness. The framework distinguishes five key dimensions of variation: perceptual richness, evaluative richness, integration at a time, integration across time, and self-consciousness. For each dimension, existing experiments that bear on it are reviewed and future experiments are suggested. By assessing a given species against each dimension, we can construct a consciousness profile for (...)
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  2. Social cognition by food-caching corvids: the western scrub-jay as a natural psychologist.Nicola S. Clayton, Joanna M. Dally & Emery & J. Nathan - 2007 - In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oxford University Press.
  3.  33
    Is Language Required to Represent Others’ Mental States? Evidence From Beliefs and Other Representations.Steven Samuel, Kresimir Durdevic, Edward W. Legg, Robert Lurz & Nicola S. Clayton - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12710.
    An important part of our Theory of Mind—the ability to reason about other people's unobservable mental states—is the ability to attribute false beliefs to others. We investigated whether processing these false beliefs, as well as similar but nonmental representations, is reliant on language. Participants watched videos in which a protagonist hides a gift and either takes a photo of it or writes a text about its location before a second person inadvertently moves the present to a different location, thereby rendering (...)
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  4.  38
    Evidence from convergent evolution and causal reasoning suggests that conclusions on human uniqueness may be premature.Alex H. Taylor & Nicola S. Clayton - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):241-242.
    We agree with Vaesen that there is evidence for cognitive differences between humans and other primates. However, it is too early to draw firm conclusions about the uniqueness of the cognitive mechanisms underlying human tool use. Tests of causal understanding are in their infancy, as is the study of animals more distantly related to humans.
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  5.  7
    Inhibition and cognitive flexibility are related to prediction of one's own future preferences in young British and Chinese children.Ning Ding, Rachael Miller & Nicola S. Clayton - 2023 - Cognition 236 (C):105433.
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  6.  12
    Neural Processes Underlying Tool Use in Humans, Macaques, and Corvids.María J. Cabrera-Álvarez & Nicola S. Clayton - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  7.  22
    Episodic memory as an explanation for the insurance hypothesis in obesity.Kirsty Mary Davies, Lucy Gaia Cheke & Nicola Susan Clayton - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  8.  61
    Imaginative scrub-jays, causal rooks, and a liberal application of occam's aftershave.Nathan J. Emery & Nicola S. Clayton - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):134-135.
    We address the claim that nonhuman animals do not represent unobservable states, based on studies of physical cognition by rooks and social cognition by scrub-jays. In both cases, the most parsimonious explanation for the results is counter to the reinterpretation hypothesis. We suggest that imagination and prospection can be investigated in animals and included in models of cognitive architecture.
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  9.  10
    Route-planning and the comparative study of future-thinking.James M. Thom & Nicola S. Clayton - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  10.  21
    Can jackdaws (Corvus monedula) select individuals based on their ability to help?Auguste M. P. von Bayern, Nicola S. Clayton & Nathan J. Emery - 2011 - Interaction Studies 12 (2):262-280.
    Knowing the individual skills and competences of one's group members may be important for deciding from whom to learn (social learning), with whom to collaborate and whom to follow. We investigated whether 12 jackdaws could select conspecifics based on their helping skills, which had been exhibited in a previous context. The birds were tested in a blocked-exit-situation, where they could choose between two conspecifics, one of which could be recruited inside. One conspecific had previously displayed the ability to open the (...)
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  11.  13
    Can jackdaws select individuals based on their ability to help?Auguste M. P. vonBayern, Nicola S. Clayton & Nathan J. Emery - 2011 - Interaction Studies 12 (2):262-280.
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