57 found
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  1. Language, thought, and falsehood in ancient Greek philosophy.Nicholas Denyer - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    CONTRASTING PREJUDICES TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD How can one say something false? How can one even think such a thing? Since, for example, all men are mortal, ...
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  2. Plato: Alcibiades.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Alcibiades was widely read in antiquity as the very best introduction to Plato. Alcibiades in his youth associated with Socrates, and went on to a spectacularly disgraceful career in politics. When Socrates was executed for 'corrupting the young men', Alcibiades was cited as a prime example. This dialogue represents Socrates meeting the charming but intellectually lazy Alcibiades as he is about to enter adult life, and using all his wiles in an attempt to win him for philosophy. In spite (...)
     
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  3.  14
    Language, Thought and Falsehood in Ancient Greek Philosophy.Nicholas Denyer - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):319-327.
  4.  78
    Plato: Protagoras.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
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  5. Sun and line: The role of the good.Nicholas Denyer - 2007 - In G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato's Republic. Cambridge University Press. pp. 284--309.
     
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  6. Time and modality in Diodorus Cronus.Nicholas Denyer - 1981 - Theoria 47 (1):31-53.
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  7.  42
    Neglected Evidence for Diodorus Cronus.Nicholas Denyer - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):597-600.
  8.  74
    Plato's Theory of Stuffs.Nicholas Denyer - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):315 - 327.
    The theory of forms makes a very poor theory of universals. It-or at least the "phaedo's" version of it-makes excellent sense as a theory of the elemental stuffs from which everything is made. This is shown by a detailed examination of all that this "phaedo" has to say about forms.
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  9.  83
    Being, Identity and Truth.Nicholas Denyer - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):117.
    Philosophers have met with many problems in discussing the interconnected concepts being, identity, and truth, and have advanced many theories to deal with them. Professor Williams argues that most of these problems and theories result from an inadequate appreciation of the ways in which the words `be', `same', and `true' work. By means of linguistic analysis he shows that being and truth are not properties, and identity is not a relation. He is thus able to demystify a number of metaphysical (...)
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  10.  69
    Dialetheism and trivialization.Nicholas Denyer - 1989 - Mind 98 (390):259-263.
  11. Never Will and Cannot.Nicholas Denyer - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
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  12. Diodorus Cronus: Modality, The Master Argument and Formalisation.Nicholas Denyer - 2009 - Humana Mente 3 (8).
  13.  12
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Patricia Kenig Curd, Jyl Gentzler, Christopher J. Martin, C. J. F. Williams, Nicholas Denyer & Christopher Kirwan - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):319-327.
  14.  63
    Pure second-order logic.Nicholas Denyer - 1992 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 33 (2):220-224.
  15. The Phaedo's final argument.Nicholas Denyer - 2007 - In Dominic Scott (ed.), Maieusis: Essays in Ancient Philosophy in Honour of Myles Burnyeat. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16.  9
    Time, action & necessity: a proof of free will.Nicholas Denyer - 1981 - London: Duckworth.
  17.  54
    V*—Chess and Life: The Structure of a Moral Code.Nicholas Denyer - 1982 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 82 (1):59-68.
    Nicholas Denyer; V*—Chess and Life: The Structure of a Moral Code, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 82, Issue 1, 1 June 1982, Pages 59–68, https.
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  18. The Seventh Letter: A Discussion of Myles Burnyeat and Michael Frede, The Pseudo-Platonic Seventh Letter.Nicholas Denyer - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 51:283-292.
     
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  19. Priest's paraconsistent arithmetic.Nicholas Denyer - 1995 - Mind 104 (415):566-575.
  20. Rieger's problem with Frege's ontology.Nicholas Denyer - 2003 - Analysis 63 (2):166–170.
  21.  23
    The Master Argument of Diodorus Cronus.Nicholas Denyer - 1999 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 2 (1):239-252.
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  22.  19
    Aristotle on Modality, I.Stephen Makin & Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations of (...)
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  23.  16
    Aristotle on Modality, I.Stephen Makin & Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.
    Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations of Aristotle's terminology, (...)
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  24.  86
    Ethics in Plato's Republic.Nicholas Denyer - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 20:19-32.
    Why should I be just? What have I to gain if I am decent, honest, moral, upright, fair and truthful? Other people benefit if I am just, but do I? And doesn't it seem clear that sometimes the benefit that other people receive from my being just is a benefit received at my expense? Perhaps then I have no adequate reason to be just. Perhaps if I have any sense I will not bother.
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  25.  72
    J.-F. Pradeau : Platon: Alcibiade. Pp. 243. Paris: G. F. Flammarion, 1999. Paper, frs. 39. ISBN: 2-08070988-7.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):278-279.
  26. Authority and the dialectic of Socrates.Nicholas Denyer - 2018 - In Jenny Bryan, Robert Wardy & James Warren (eds.), Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  27.  18
    A Note on Zeno B3.Nicholas Denyer - 1987 - In Jan T. J. Srzednicki (ed.), Initiatives in Logic. M. Nijhoff. pp. 81--83.
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  28.  55
    Aristotle on modality, II.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):163–178.
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations of (...)
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  29.  3
    Aristotle on Modality, II.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):163-178.
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  30.  89
    Critical notice of Richard Gaskin's The Unity of the Proposition.Nicholas Denyer - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):173 – 179.
  31.  38
    Ease and difficulty: a modal logic with deontic applications.Nicholas Denyer - 1990 - Theoria 56 (1-2):42-61.
  32.  35
    Ethics in Plato's Republic.Nicholas Denyer - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 20:19-32.
    Why should I be just? What have I to gain if I am decent, honest, moral, upright, fair and truthful? Other people benefit if I am just, but do I? And doesn't it seem clear that sometimes the benefit that other people receive from my being just is a benefit received at my expense? Perhaps then I have no adequate reason to be just. Perhaps if I have any sense I will not bother.
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  33. Is Anything Absolutely Wrong?Nicholas Denyer - 1997 - In David S. Oderberg & Jacqueline A. Laing (eds.), Human lives: critical essays on consequentialist bioethics. New York, N.Y.: St. Martin's Press. pp. 39--57.
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  34.  20
    II_– _Nicholas Denyer.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):163-178.
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  35.  38
    Just war.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 46:137-.
    The innocent are immune. We must never, that is, make the object of any violent attack those who bear no responsibility for doing wrong to others; and only with grave reason and in extreme circumstances should we be prepared to cause them any incidental harm as we press home a violent attack against those who are its legitimate objects. This principle of the immunity of the innocent seems almost self-evidently true. This is not to say that the principle is incapable (...)
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  36. Language, thought and falsehood in ancient Greek.Nicholas Denyer - forthcoming - Philosophy.
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  37.  71
    Names, verbs and sentences.Nicholas Denyer - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (4):619-623.
    Metaphysicians often declare that there are large ontological differences (properties versus individuals, universals versus particulars) correlated with the linguistic distinction between names and verbs. Gaskin argues against all such declarations on the grounds that we may quantify with equal ease over the referents of both types of expression. However, his argument must be wrong, given the massive differences between first- and second-order qualification. Its only grain of truth is that these differences show up only in the logic of relations, and (...)
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  38.  62
    Names, verbs and quantification again.Nicholas Denyer - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (3):439-440.
    There are enormous differences between quantifying name-variables only, quantifying verb-variables only, and quantifying both. These differences are found only in the logic of polyadic predication; and this presumably is why Richard Gaskin thinks that they distinguish names from transitive verbs only, and not from verbs generally. But that thought is mistaken: these differences also distinguish names from intransitive verbs. They thus vindicate the common idea that on the difference between names and verbs we may base grandiose metaphysical distinctions, and undermine (...)
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  39.  15
    Names, Verbs and Quantification.Nicholas Denyer - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (286):619 - 623.
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  40.  29
    Philoponus, Diodorus, and Possibility.Nicholas Denyer - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):327-.
    The definition here ascribed to Philo is entirely in line with what we know of Philo from else where: Alex. Aphr. in APr. 184.6–10; Simp, in Cat. 195.33–196.5; Boethius, in de Int. 234.10–15. The same is not true of the definition here ascribed to Diodorus. For Diodorus, we are told elsewhere, defined the possible as that which either is or will be so: Cic. Fat. 13, 17; Plu. de Stoic rep. 1055d-e; Alex. Aphr. in APr. 183.42–184.5; Boethius, in de Int. (...)
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  41.  9
    Philoponus, Diodorus, and Possibility.Nicholas Denyer - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):327-327.
    The definition here ascribed to Philo is entirely in line with what we know of Philo from else where: Alex. Aphr. in APr. 184.6–10; Simp, in Cat. 195.33–196.5; Boethius, in de Int. 234.10–15. The same is not true of the definition here ascribed to Diodorus. For Diodorus, we are told elsewhere, defined the possible as that which either is or will be so: Cic. Fat. 13, 17; Plu. de Stoic rep. 1055d-e; Alex. Aphr. in APr. 183.42–184.5; Boethius, in de Int. (...)
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  42.  15
    Plato: The Apology of Socrates and Xenophon: The Apology of Socrates.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    In 399 BC Socrates was prosecuted, convicted, sentenced to death and executed. These events were the culmination of a long philosophical career, a career in which, without writing a word, he established himself as the figure whom all philosophers of the next few generations wished to follow. The Apologies by Plato and Xenophon are rival accounts of how, at his trial, Socrates defended himself and his philosophy. This edition brings together both Apologies within a single volume. The commentary answers literary, (...)
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  43.  45
    Robin le poidevin (ed.) Questions of time and tense. (Oxford: Clarendon press, 1998). Pp. XII+293. £35.00 hbk.Nicholas Denyer - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (2):229-240.
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  44. Reading platonic writing.Nicholas Denyer - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 36:321.
  45. Reading Platonic Writing: A Discussion of Christopher Rowe, Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Nicholas Denyer - 2009 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume Xxxvi. Oxford University Press.
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  46.  14
    Some Aspects of Aspect: Reflections on M.M. McCabe’s ‘First Chop Your Logos: Socrates and the Sophists on Language, Logic and Development’.Nicholas Denyer - 2019 - Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (2):151-154.
    ABSTRACT McCabe is right on one thing and wrong on another. She is right to draw our attention to the different aspects that a verb might have—and not only because attention to aspect helps us understand what is going on in Plato’s Euthydemus. Getting straight on aspect promises benefits for our philosophy of action, and for our metaphysics more generally, comparable to those of getting straight about modality and about excuses. The same is true of getting straight on the active, (...)
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  47.  64
    Truth, etc.: Six lectures on ancient logic – Jonathan Barnes.Nicholas Denyer - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):176–177.
  48.  18
    Traffic Lights.Nicholas Denyer - 1992 - Philosophy Now 4:29-30.
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  49.  86
    Traffic lights: A modest proposal.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - Mind 109:45 - 46.
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  50.  90
    The principle of harmony.Nicholas Denyer - 1989 - Analysis 49 (1):21-22.
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