Results for 'Neuroethics'

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  1.  33
    Neuroethics Questions to Guide Ethical Research in the International Brain Initiatives.K. S. Rommelfanger, S. J. Jeong, A. Ema, T. Fukushi, K. Kasai, K. M. Ramos, Arleen Salles, I. Singh, Paul Boshears, Global Neuroethics Summit Delegates & Hagop Sarkissian - 2018 - Neuron 100 (1):19-36.
    Increasingly, national governments across the globe are prioritizing investments in neuroscience. Currently, seven active or in-development national-level brain research initiatives exist, spanning four continents. Engaging with the underlying values and ethical concerns that drive brain research across cultural and continental divides is critical to future research. Culture influences what kinds of science are supported and where science can be conducted through ethical frameworks and evaluations of risk. Neuroscientists and philosophers alike have found themselves together encountering perennial questions; these questions are (...)
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  2.  10
    Neuroethics, Justice and Autonomy: Public Reason in the Cognitive Enhancement Debate.Veljko Dubljević - 2019 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
    This book explicitly addresses policy options in a democratic society regarding cognitive enhancement drugs and devices. The book offers an in-depth case by case analysis of existing and emerging cognitive neuroenhancement technologies and canvasses a distinct political neuroethics approach. The author provides an argument on the much debated issue of fairness of cognitive enhancement practices and tackles the tricky issue of how to respect preferences of citizens opposing and those preferring enhancement. The author persuasively argues the necessity of a (...)
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  3. Neuroethics.Katrina Sifferd - 2016 - In Vilayanur Ramachandran (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Behavior, 2e. Elsevier.
    Neuroethics is the body of work exploring the ethical, legal, and social implications of neuroscience. This work can be separated into two rough categories. The neuroscience of ethics concerns a neuroscientific understanding of the brain processes that underpin moral judgment and behavior. The ethics of neuroscience, on the other hand, includes the potential impact advances in neuroscience may have on social, moral and philosophical ideas and institutions, as well as the ethical principles that should guide brain research, treatment of (...)
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  4.  36
    Neuroethics and Nonhuman Animals.L. Syd M. Johnson, Andrew Fenton & Adam Shriver (eds.) - 2020 - Springer.
    This edited volume represents a unique addition to the available literature on animal ethics, animal studies, and neuroethics. Its goal is to expand discussions on animal ethics and neuroethics by weaving together different threads: philosophy of mind and animal minds, neuroscientific study of animal minds, and animal ethics. Neuroethical questions concerning animals’ moral status, animal minds and consciousness, animal pain, and the adequacy of animal models for neuropsychiatric disease have long been topics of debate in philosophy and ethics, (...)
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  5. Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century.Neil Levy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Neuroscience has dramatically increased understanding of how mental states and processes are realized by the brain, thus opening doors for treating the multitude of ways in which minds become dysfunctional. This book explores questions such as when is it permissible to alter a person's memories, influence personality traits or read minds? What can neuroscience tell us about free will, self-control, self-deception and the foundations of morality? The view of neuroethics offered here argues that many of our new powers to (...)
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  6.  16
    Translational Neuroethics: A Vision for a More Integrated, Inclusive, and Impactful Field.Anna Wexler & Laura Specker Sullivan - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (4):388-399.
    As early-career neuroethicists, we come to the field of neuroethics at a unique moment: we are well-situated to consider nearly two decades of neuroethics scholarship and identify challenges that have persisted across time. But we are also looking squarely ahead, embarking on the next generation of exciting and productive neuroethics scholarship. In this article, we both reflect backwards and turn our gaze forward. First, we highlight criticisms of neuroethics, both from scholars within the field and outside (...)
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  7. Rethinking neuroethics in the light of the extended mind thesis.Neil Levy - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):3-11.
    The extended mind thesis is the claim that mental states extend beyond the skulls of the agents whose states they are. This seemingly obscure and bizarre claim has far-reaching implications for neuroethics, I argue. In the first half of this article, I sketch the extended mind thesis and defend it against criticisms. In the second half, I turn to its neuroethical implications. I argue that the extended mind thesis entails the falsity of the claim that interventions into the brain (...)
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  8. Neuroethics 1995–2012. A Bibliometric Analysis of the Guiding Themes of an Emerging Research Field.Jon Leefmann, Clement Levallois & Elisabeth Hildt - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
    In bioethics, the first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by the emergence of interest in the ethical, legal, and social aspects of neuroscience research. At the same time an ongoing extension of the topics and phenomena addressed by neuroscientists was observed alongside its rise as one of the leading disciplines in the biomedical science. One of these phenomena addressed by neuroscientists and moral psychologists was the neural processes involved in moral decision-making. Today both strands of research are often (...)
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  9.  14
    Neuroethics for Fantasyland or for the Clinic? The Limitations of Speculative Ethics.Sven Ove Hansson - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (4):630-641.
    What purpose can be served by empirically unsubstantiated speculation in ethics? In answering that question, we need to distinguish between the major branches of ethics. In foundational moral philosophy, the use of speculative examples is warranted to the extent that ethical principles and theories are assumed to be applicable even under the extreme circumstances referred to in these examples. Such an assumption is in need of justification, and it cannot just be taken for granted. In applied ethics, the use of (...)
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  10.  75
    Neuroethics and the Ethical Parity Principle.Joseph P. DeMarco & Paul J. Ford - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):317-325.
    Neil Levy offers the most prominent moral principles that are specifically and exclusively designed to apply to neuroethics. His two closely related principles, labeled as versions of the ethical parity principle , are intended to resolve moral concerns about neurological modification and enhancement [1]. Though EPP is appealing and potentially illuminating, we reject the first version and substantially modify the second. Since his first principle, called EPP , is dependent on the contention that the mind literally extends into external (...)
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  11. Neuroethics: A New Way of Doing Ethics.Neil Levy - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (2):3-9.
    The aim of this article is to argue, by example, for neuroethics as a new way of doing ethics. Rather than simply giving us a new subject matter—the ethical issues arising from neuroscience—to attend to, neuroethics offers us the opportunity to refine the tools we use. Ethicists often need to appeal to the intuitions provoked by consideration of cases to evaluate the permissibility of types of actions; data from the sciences of the mind give us reason to believe (...)
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  12.  34
    Neuroethics and Responsibility in Conducting Neuromarketing Research.Monica Diana Bercea Olteanu - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):191-202.
    Over the last decade, academics and companies have shown an increased interest in brain studies and human cerebral functions related to consumer’s reactions to different stimuli. Therefore neuroethics emerged as a way to draw attention to ethical issues concerning different aspects of brain research. This review explores the environment of neuromarketing research in both business and academic areas from an ethical point of view. The paper focuses on the ethical issues involving subjects participating in neuroimaging studies, consumers that experience (...)
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  13. Neuroethics and the extended mind.Neil Levy - 2011 - In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 285.
    Neuroethics offers unprecedented opportunities as well as challenges. The challenges stem from the range of difficult ethical issues, which are confronted by neuroethicists. Issues concerning the nature of consciousness, of personal identity, free will, and so on, are all grist for the neuroethical mill. This article argues that this debate bears centrally on neuroethics and is significant for neuroethics. Whether the best interpretation of the facts to which proponents of the extended mind appeal is that the mind (...)
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  14.  68
    Translating Neuroethics: Reflections from Muslim Ethics: Commentary on “Ethical Concepts and Future Challenges of Neuroimaging: An Islamic Perspective”.Ebrahim Moosa - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):519-528.
    Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included. Cultural translation involves lived encounters with modernity and its byproduct, modern science. Serious ethical debate requires more (...)
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  15. Neuroethics, Consciousness and Death: Where Objective Knowledge Meets Subjective Experience.Alberto Molina-Pérez & Anne Dalle Ave - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 13 (4):259-261.
    Laura Specker Sullivan (2022) makes a fairly compelling case for the value of the perspectives of Buddhist practitioners in neuroethics. In this study, Tibetan Buddhist monks have been asked, among other things, whether consciousness, in brain-injured patients in a minimally conscious state, entails a duty to preserve life. In our view, some of the participants’ responses could be used to inform the bioethical debate on death determination.
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  16.  29
    Neuroethics beyond Normal.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):121-140.
    Abstract:An integrated and principled neuroethics offers ethical guidelines able to transcend conventional and medical reliance on normality standards. Elsewhere we have proposed four principles for wise guidance on human transformations. Principles like these are already urgently needed, as bio- and cyberenhancements are rapidly emerging. Context matters. Neither “treatments” nor “enhancements” are objectively identifiable apart from performance expectations, social contexts, and civic orders. Lessons learned from disability studies about enablement and inclusion suggest a fresh way to categorize modifications to the (...)
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  17.  51
    Neuroethics and the Possible Types of Moral Enhancement.John R. Shook - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (4):3-14.
    Techniques for achieving moral enhancement will modify brain processes to produce what is alleged to be more moral conduct. Neurophilosophy and neuroethics must ponder what “moral enhancement” could possibly be, if possible at all. Objections to the very possibility of moral enhancement, raised from various philosophical and neuroscientific standpoints, fail to justify skepticism, but they do place serious constraints on the kinds of efficacious moral enhancers. While there won't be a “morality pill,” and hopes for global moral enlightenment will (...)
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  18.  21
    Pragmatic Neuroethics: Lived Experiences as a Source of Moral Knowledge.Gabriela Pavarini & Ilina Singh - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):578-589.
    Abstract:In this article, we present a pragmatic approach to neuroethics, referring back to John Dewey and his articulation of the “common good” and its discovery through systematic methods. Pragmatic neuroethics bridges philosophy and social sciences and, at a very basic level, considers that ethics is not dissociable from lived experiences and everyday moral choices. We reflect on the integration between empirical methods and normative questions, using as our platform recent bioethical and neuropsychological research into moral cognition, action, and (...)
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  19.  36
    Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. This ground-breaking book on the emerging field of neuroethics answers many pertinent questions, such as: What makes monitoring and manipulating the human brain so ethically challenging? Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for (...)
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  20.  16
    Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our behavior and lose our free will? Should certain brain scan studies be disallowed on the basis of moral grounds? Why is the media so interested in (...)
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  21.  79
    Neuroethics as a brain-based philosophy of life: The case of Michael S. Gazzaniga.Arne Rasmusson - 2008 - Neuroethics 2 (1):3-11.
    Michael S. Gazzaniga, a pioneer and world leader in cognitive neuroscience, has made an initial attempt to develop neuroethics into a brain-based philosophy of life that he hopes will replace the irrational religious and political belief-systems that still partly govern modern societies. This article critically examines Gazzaniga’s proposal and shows that his actual moral arguments have little to do with neuroscience. Instead, they are based on unexamined political, cultural and moral conceptions, narratives and values. A more promising way of (...)
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  22.  17
    Neuroethics and the Neuroscientific Turn.Jon Leefmann & Elisabeth Hildt - 2017 - In L. Syd M. Johnson & Karen S. Rommelfanger (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Neuroethics. New York City, New York, USA: pp. 14-32.
    Stimulated by a general salience of neuroscientific research and the declaration of neuroscience as one of the leading disciplines of the current century, a diversity of disciplines from the social sciences and the humanities have engaged in discussions about the role of the brain in various social and cultural phenomena. The general importance assigned to the brain in so many areas of academic and social life nowadays has been called the ‘neuroscientific turn’. One of the fields that gained particular attention (...)
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  23. Neuroethics: Ethics and the sciences of the mind.Neil Levy - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):69-81.
    Neuroethics is a rapidly growing subfield, straddling applied ethics, moral psychology and philosophy of mind. It has clear affinities to bioethics, inasmuch as both are responses to new developments in science and technology, but its scope is far broader and more ambitious because neuroethics is as much concerned with how the sciences of the mind illuminate traditional philosophical questions as it is with questions concerning the permissibility of using technologies stemming from these sciences. In this article, I sketch (...)
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  24.  1
    The methods of Neuroethics.Luca Malatesti & John McMillan - 2024 - Cambridge University Press.
    This Element offers a framework for exploring the methodological challenges of neuroethics. The aim is to provide a roadmap for the methodological assumptions, and related pitfalls, involved in the interdisciplinary investigation of the ethical and legal implications of neuroscientific research and technology. It illustrates these points via the debate about the ethical and legal responsibility of psychopaths. Argument and the conceptual analysis of normative concepts such as 'personhood' or 'human agency' is central to neuroethics. This Element discusses different (...)
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  25.  8
    Neuroethics and philosophy.Jovan Babic - 2014 - Filozofija I Društvo 25 (2):181-203.
    Neuro-ethics is probablу the fastest-growing part of applied ethics. Its main thesis, or hypothesis, is that certain natural processes in brain and nerves produce certain moral, and immoral, behaviors. All these processes can be explained causally, and (if this is so) neuro-ethics might be the most recent extension of neuroscience. There are some metaphysical and ethical pitfalls to be considered, however, like the (incorrect) conflation of causal explanation and rational justification in defining values, and not only for non-moral, but also (...)
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  26. Neuroethics of free will.Patrick Haggard - 2011 - In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 219.
    The concept of individual free will is difficult to reconcile with a materialist view of the brain. The debate over “free will” involves a series of several questions about the origin of human actions, and their resulting social, legal, and ethical implications. This article sets out the reasons that scientific questions regarding free will have important ethical and social consequences. It then considers the neuroscientific debate over whether a conscious experience of volition does or does not precede the brain's preparation (...)
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  27.  8
    Neuroethics.Katrina L. Sifferd & Joshua VanArsdall - 2021 - In Benjamin D. Young & Carolyn Dicey Jennings (eds.), Mind, Cognition, and Neuroscience: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    Neuroethics is the body of work exploring the ethical, legal, and social implications of neuroscience. This work can be separated into two rough categories. The “neuroscience of ethics” concerns a neuroscientific understanding of the brain processes that underpin moral judgment and behavior. The “ethics of neuroscience” refers to the potential impact advances in neuroscience may have on the ethical principles that should guide brain research, treatment of brain disease, and cognitive enhancement. The Contemporary Issues section of this chapter will (...)
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  28.  12
    Neuroethics in a “Psy” World.Arleen Salles - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):297-307.
    Abstract:Given the cultural psychoanalytic tradition that shapes the thought of Argentineans and their current skepticism with regard to neurosciences when it comes to understanding human behavior, this article addresses the question of how a healthy neuroethics can develop in the country.
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  29. Neuroethics for the new millennium.Adina L. Roskies - 2002 - Neuron 35 (1):21-23.
    ics. Each of these can be pursued independently to a large extent, but perhaps most intriguing is to contem- plate how progress in each will affect the other. The past several months have seen heightened interest <blockquote> _<b>The Ethics of Neuroscience</b>_ </blockquote> in the intersection of ethics and neuroscience. In the The ethics of neuroscience can be roughly subdivided popular press, the topic grabbed headlines in a May.
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  30.  30
    Neuroethics: A Philosophical Challenge.Fritz Allhoff, Françoise Baylis, Richard Glen Boire, Christopher Buford, Tom Buller, Raymond DeVries, Hubert Doucet, Kathinka Evers, Joseph Fins & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):31-33.
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  31.  47
    Neuroethics, confidentiality, and a cultural imperative in early onset Alzheimer disease: a case study with a First Nation population.Shaun Stevenson, B. L. Beattie, Richard Vedan, Emily Dwosh, Lindsey Bruce & Judy Illes - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:15.
    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society’s immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics (...)
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  32. Neuroethics in Spain: Neurological Determinism or Moral Freedom?Enrique Bonete - 2012 - Neuroethics 6 (1):225-232.
    Spanish culture has recently shown interest about Neuroethics, a new line of research and reflection. It can be said that two general, and somewhat opposing, perspectives are currently being developed in Spain about neuroethics-related topics. One originates from the neuroscientific field and the other from the philosophical field. We will see, throughout this article, that the Spanish authors, who I am going to select here, deal with very diverse neuroethical topics and that they analyse them from different intellectual (...)
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  33.  49
    Neuroethics, Cognitive Technologies and the Extended Mind Perspective.Jan-Hendrik Heinrichs - 2018 - Neuroethics 14 (1):59-72.
    Current debates in neuroethics engage with extremely diverse technologies, for some of which it is a point of contention whether they should be a topic for neuroethics at all. In this article, I will evaluate extended mind theory’s claim of being able to define the scope of neuroethics’ domain as well as determining the extension of an individual’s mind via its so-called trust and glue criteria. I argue that a) extending the domain of neuroethics by this (...)
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  34.  58
    Two Problematic Foundations of Neuroethics and Pragmatist Reconstructions.Eric Racine & Matthew Sample - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):566-577.
    Common understandings of neuroethics, i.e., of its distinctive nature, are premised on two distinct sets of claims: (1) neuroscience can change views about the nature of ethics itself and neuroethics is dedicated to reaping such an understanding of ethics; (2) neuroscience poses challenges distinct from other areas of medicine and science and neuroethics tackles those issues. Critiques have rightfully challenged both claims, stressing how the first may lead to problematic forms of reductionism while the second relies on (...)
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  35. Neuroethics.P. R. Wolpe - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
     
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  36.  8
    Neuroethics and cultural context: The case of electroconvulsive therapy in Argentina.Paula Castelli, Salvador M. Guinjoan, Abel Wajnerman-Paz & Arleen Salles - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    As neuroethics continues to grow as an established discipline, it has been charged with not being sufficiently sensitive to the way in which the identification, conceptualization, and management of the ethical issues raised by neuroscience and its applications are shaped by local systems of knowledge and structures. Recently there have been calls for explicit recognition of the role played by local cultural contexts and for the development of cross‐cultural methodologies that can facilitate meaningful cultural engagement. In this article, we (...)
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  37.  3
    The Neuroethics of Memory: From Total Recall to Oblivion.Walter Glannon - 2019 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    The Neuroethics of Memory is a thematically integrated analysis and discussion of neuroethical questions about memory capacity and content, as well as interventions to alter it. These include: how does memory function enable agency, and how does memory dysfunction disable it? To what extent is identity based on our capacity to accurately recall the past? Could a person who becomes aware during surgery be harmed if they have no memory of the experience? How do we weigh the benefits and (...)
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  38.  4
    From Neuroethics to Neo-romanticism. Aldous Huxley in Response to Current Proposals for Ethical and Legal Regulation of Neuroscience.Luis Enrique Echarte Alonso - 2021 - SCIO Revista de Filosofía 21:113-148.
    The neuroethics field emerged in the early 2000s in an effort to face important philosophical dilemmas and anticipate disruptive social changes linked to the use of neurotechnology (Safire, 2002). From very early on, this field grew out of two core issues, namely inquiries into the ethics of neuroscience –concerning the moral use of knowledge and technology– and inquiries into the neuroscience of ethics –on how new brain function evidence can change human self-understanding (Roskies 2002). Similarly, neurolaw is now on (...)
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  39.  14
    Neuroethics : what else is new?Alex Mauron - unknown
    Bioethics has changed considerably over the years, the increasing diversity of topics of bioethical interest having led to specialisation if not fragmentation. In this context the term “neuroethics" emerged, and it soon became clear that it could be understood in two ways. The “ethics of neuroscience” assesses the ethical and philosophical implications of research in neuroscience and of the application of these discoveries, especially as regards enhancement of “normal” human faculties or new challenges to privacy. The “neuroscience of ethics” (...)
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  40.  59
    Neuroethics: Agency in the Age of Brain Science.Joshua May - 2023 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    What ethical questions does neuroscience raise and help to answer? Neuroethics blends philosophical analysis with modern brain science to address central questions within this growing field: · Is free will an illusion? · Does brain stimulation impair a patient's autonomy? · Does having a mental disorder excuse bad behavior? · Is addiction a brain disease? · Should we trust our gut feelings in ethics and politics? · Should we alter our brains to become better people? · Is human reasoning (...)
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  41.  52
    Neuroethics and the Scientific Revision of Common Sense.Nada Gligorov - 2016 - Dordrecht: Springer, Studies in Brain and Mind, Vol. 11.
    Neuroethics is an emerging interdisciplinary field with unsettled boundaries. Many of the ethical issues within the purview of neuroethics could be described as resulting from the clash between the scientific perspective on concepts such as free will, personal identity, consciousness, etc., and the putatively commonsense conceptions of those terms. The assumption that undergirds the framing of the conflict between these two approaches is that advances in neuroscience, psychiatry, and psychology can be used to explain phenomena covered by commonsense (...)
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  42.  33
    Integrating Neuroethics and Neuroscience: A Framework.Joseph Vukov, Sarah Khan, Sydney Samoska, Marley Hornewer, Rohan Meda & Kit Rempala - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (3):217-218.
    The BRAIN 2.0 Neuroethics Report reflects on the ways in which neuroscientific research may inform our understanding of concepts such as consciousness and empathy, and how advances in this understanding might in turn affect practices such as research on non-human animal primates. Generally, the Report calls for “the integration of neuroscience and neuroethics during the remaining years of the BRAIN initiative and beyond” (NIH 2019). In responding to the Report, the articles in this issue grapple with theoretical questions (...)
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  43.  6
    A Neuroethical Analysis of Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing Diverse Interests associated with Collateral Findings.Ikeolu O. Afolabi & Michael O. S. Afolabi - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):66-68.
    Pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) seek to show the effectiveness of treatments in routine, clinical practice (MacPherson 2004). However, a number of ethical challenges come to the fore when collater...
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  44. Neuroethics and Animals: Report and Recommendations From the University of Pennsylvania Animal Research Neuroethics Workshop.Adam Shriver & Tyler M. John - 2021 - ILAR Journal (00):1-10.
    Growing awareness of the ethical implications of neuroscience in the early years of the 21st century led to the emergence of the new academic field of “neuroethics,” which studies the ethical implications of developments in the neurosciences. However, despite the acceleration and evolution of neuroscience research on nonhuman animals, the unique ethical issues connected with neuroscience research involving nonhuman animals remain underdiscussed. This is a significant oversight given the central place of animal models in neuroscience. To respond to these (...)
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  45.  34
    Neuroethical Theories.Matti Häyry - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2):165.
    Neuroethics addresses moral, legal, and social questions created or highlighted by theoretical and practical developments in neuroscience. Practices in need of scrutiny currently include at least brain imaging with new techniques, chemical attempts to shift exceptional brain function toward normality, chemical attempts to enhance ordinary brain function beyond normality, and brain manipulation by other methods.Matti H ja paha.
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  46.  41
    A principled and cosmopolitan neuroethics: considerations for international relevance.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:1.
    Neuroethics applies cognitive neuroscience for prescribing alterations to conceptions of self and society, and for prescriptively judging the ethical applications of neurotechnologies. Plentiful normative premises are available to ground such prescriptivity, however prescriptive neuroethics may remain fragmented by social conventions, cultural ideologies, and ethical theories. Herein we offer that an objectively principled neuroethics for international relevance requires a new meta-ethics: understanding how morality works, and how humans manage and improve morality, as objectively based on the brain and (...)
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  47.  16
    Evaluating Moral Intuitions in Neuroethics: A Neurophenomenological Perspective.Hillel D. Braude - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (2):22-24.
    Neil Levy (2011) argues that neuroethics as a new discipline distinct from bioethics provides methodological tools to evaluate the validity of our moral intuitions. This naturalistic claim that mor...
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  48. Neuroethics, Gender and the Response to Difference.Deboleena Roy - 2011 - Neuroethics 5 (3):217-230.
    This paper examines how the new field of neuroethics is responding to the old problem of difference, particularly to those ideas of biological difference emerging from neuroimaging research that purports to further delineate our understanding of sex and/or gender differences in the brain. As the field develops, it is important to ask what is new about neuroethics compared to bioethics in this regard, and whether the concept of difference is being problematized within broader contexts of power and representation. (...)
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  49. Neuroethics.Eric Racine & Judy Illes - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 495--503.
     
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  50.  17
    Neuroethics and Stem Cell Transplantation.Dieter Birnbacher - 2009 - Medicine Studies 1 (1):67-76.
    Is there anything special about the ethical problems of intracerebral stem-cell transplantation and other forms of cell or tissue transplantation in the brain that provides neuroethics with a distinctive normative profile, setting it apart from other branches of medical ethics? This is examined with reference to some of the ethical problems associated with interventions in the brain such as potential changes in personal identity and potential changes in personality. It is argued that these problems are not sufficiently specific to (...)
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