5 found
Order:
  1.  54
    Unreasonable reasons: normative judgements in the assessment of mental capacity.Natalie F. Banner - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1038-1044.
  2.  82
    Mental disorders are not brain disorders.Natalie F. Banner - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):509-513.
  3.  47
    ‘Radical Interpretation’ and the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Natalie F. Banner & George Szmukler - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (4):379-394.
    The assessment of patients' decision-making capacity (DMC) has become an important area of clinical practice, and since it provides the gateway for a consideration of non-consensual treatment, has major ethical implications. Tests of DMC such as under the Mental Capacity Act (2005) for England and Wales aim at supporting autonomy and reducing unwarranted paternalism by being ‘procedural’, focusing on how the person arrived at a treatment decision. In practice, it is difficult, especially in problematic or borderline cases, to avoid a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4.  59
    The 'Bournewood Gap' and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards in the Mental Capacity Act 2005.Natalie F. Banner - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):123-126.
    The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS) were recently introduced into the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) via an amendment to mental health legislation in England and Wales. As Shah (2011) discusses, the rationale behind creating these protocols was to close what is commonly referred to as the ‘Bournewood gap’; a legislative loophole that allowed a severely autistic man (H.L.) who did not initially dissent to admission to be detained in a hospital and deprived of his liberty in his ‘best interests’ as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  41
    The new philosophy of psychiatry: its (recent) past, present and future: a review of the Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry. [REVIEW]Natalie F. Banner & Tim Thornton - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:9-.
    There has been a recent growth in philosophy of psychiatry that draws heavily (although not exclusively) on analytic philosophy with the aim of a better understanding of psychiatry through an analysis of some of its fundamental concepts. This 'new philosophy of psychiatry' is an addition to both analytic philosophy and to the broader interpretation of mental health care. Nevertheless, it is already a flourishing philosophical field. One indication of this is the new Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations