8 found
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Nabina Liebow [7]Nabina K. Liebow [1]
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Nabina Liebow
American University
  1.  58
    White Tears: Emotion Regulation and White Fragility.Nabina Liebow & Trip Glazer - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-21.
    ABSTRACTWe contribute to the growing literature on white fragility by examining how the distinctively emotional manifestations of white fragility make it...
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  2. Internalized Oppression and Its Varied Moral Harms: Self‐Perceptions of Reduced Agency and Criminality.Nabina Liebow - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):713-729.
    The dominant view in the philosophical literature contends that internalized oppression, especially that experienced in virtue of one's womanhood, reduces one's sense of agency. Here, I extend these arguments and suggest a more nuanced account. In particular, I argue that internalized oppression can cause a person to conceive of herself as a deviant agent as well as a reduced one. This self-conception is also damaging to one's moral identity and creates challenges that are not captured by merely analyzing a reduced (...)
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  3.  48
    Confronting White Ignorance: White Psychology and Rational Self‐Regulation.Trip Glazer & Nabina Liebow - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):50-71.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, Volume 52, Issue 1, Page 50-71, Spring 2021.
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  4.  9
    Confronting White Ignorance: White Psychology and Rational Self-Regulation.Trip Glazer & Nabina Liebow - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):50-71.
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  5.  10
    “What Can I Possibly Do?”: White Individual Responsibility for Addressing Racism as a Public Health Crisis.Nabina K. Liebow & Travis N. Rieder - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (3):274-282.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 3, Page 274-282, March 2022.
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  6.  4
    ‘I Know What It's Like’: Epistemic Arrogance, Disability, and Race.Nabina Liebow & Rachel Levit Ades - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-21.
    Understanding and empathy on the part of those in privileged positions are often cited as powerful tools in the fight against oppression. Too often, however, those in positions of power assume they know what it is like to be less well off when, in actuality, they do not. This kind of assumption represents a thinking vice we dub synecdoche epistemic arrogance. In instances of synecdoche epistemic arrogance, a person who has privilege wrongly assumes, based on limited experiences, that she can (...)
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  7.  7
    Bioethics Education and Nonideal Theory.Nabina Liebow & Kelso Cratsley - 2021 - In Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World. Springer. pp. 119-142.
    Bioethics has increasingly become a standard part of medical school education and the training of healthcare professionals more generally. This is a promising development, as it has the potential to help future practitioners become more attentive to moral concerns and, perhaps, better moral reasoners. At the same time, there is growing recognition within bioethics that nonideal theory can play an important role in formulating normative recommendations. In this chapter we discuss what this shift toward nonideal theory means for ethical curricula (...)
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  8. Withholding Information to Protect a Loved One.Todd J. Kilbaugh, Daniel Groll, Nabina Liebow, Wynne Morrison & John D. Lantos - 2016 - Pediatrics 6 (136).
    Parents respond to the death of a child in very different ways. Some parents may be violent or angry, some sad and tearful, some quiet and withdrawn, and some frankly delusional. We present a case in which a father’s reaction to his daughter’s death is a desire to protect his wife from the stressful information. The wife is in the second trimester of a high-risk pregnancy and so is particularly fragile. We asked pediatricians and bioethicists to discuss the ways in (...)
     
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