103 found
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  1. A History of Greece to 322 B.C.N. G. L. Hammond - 1968 - British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (1):111.
  2.  56
    A History of Macedonia.N. G. L. Hammond - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (02):243-.
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  3.  3
    Studies in Greek History.J. A. O. Larsen & N. G. L. Hammond - 1975 - American Journal of Philology 96 (3):329.
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  4.  18
    A Cavalry Unit in the Army of Antigonus Monophthalmus: Asthippoi.N. G. L. Hammond - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):128-.
    As the editor of the new Budé edition of Diodorus Siculus 19 has said, R is ‘the more often correct’ of the two main manuscripts and the other, F, has a number of acceptable variants; and she reckons the division between R and F to have been ‘fairly ancient’. All other manuscripts are merely copies, more or less faithful, of R and F. For the passage which I wish to consider I quote the text as given in R.
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  5.  22
    II. The Philaids and the Chersonese.N. G. L. Hammond - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):113-.
    The discovery of the inscription with the name of [M]iltiades, which confirmed the statement in Dionysius Halicarnassensis 7. 3. 1 that a Miltiades was archon at Athens in 524/3, prompts a reconsideration of the problems presented by the accounts in Herodotus and in Marcellinus Life of Thucydides concerning the Philaid family. To the question, who is this Miltiades, the following answers have been given. ‘He is not a Philaid.’ The objection to this answer is that the Peisistratids either occupied the (...)
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  6.  12
    A Cavalry Unit in the Army of Antigonus Monophthalmus: Asthippoi.N. G. L. Hammond - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (1):128-135.
    As the editor of the new Budé edition of Diodorus Siculus 19 has said, R is ‘the more often correct’ of the two main manuscripts and the other, F, has a number of acceptable variants; and she reckons the division between R and F to have been ‘fairly ancient’. All other manuscripts are merely copies, more or less faithful, of R and F. For the passage which I wish to consider I quote the text as given in R.
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  7.  7
    Philip's actions in 347 and early 346 b.c.N. G. L. Hammond - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):367-.
    Although much of great interest has been written recently about the period of the socalled Peace of Philocrates, little or nothing has been said of a passage which provides important information in Justin's Epitome of the Historiae Philippicae of Pompeius Trogus. This passage, 8.3.12–15, comes between the destruction of Olynthus and the arrival of the Athenian envoys at Pella . In subject matter it corresponds with ‘the subjugation of Thrace and Thessaly’ in Prologue 8 of Pompeius Trogus – a topic (...)
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  8.  6
    The Family of Orthagoras.N. G. L. Hammond - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (1-2):45-.
    The reconstructions of the Orthagoras genealogy are so numerous and so different that it is rarely used for chronological purposes. The aim of this paper is to show that there is clear evidence on this subject, and that it has chronological value.
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  9.  47
    The Sources of Diodorus Siculus XVI.N. G. L. Hammond - 1938 - Classical Quarterly 32 (3-4):137-151.
    The sources of the Sicilian narrative have been recently investigated by Barber and Laqueur. The former has suggested a comparison of Plutarch's Lives of Dion and Timoleon with the narrative of Diodorus as an avenue of approach to the problem; such a comparison will be applied later in order to check the conclusions reached by a survey of Diodorus' narrative. The latter has exploited the argument from detail, a method which has already been criticized in Article I. Space will not (...)
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  10.  3
    The Sources of Diodorus Siculus XVI.N. G. L. Hammond - 1937 - Classical Quarterly 31 (2):79-91.
    The source-criticism2 of Diodorus XVI has been dominated by the principle of argument from detail. Thus, if two details in Diodorus' text are found to conflict, they are assumed to derive from different sources and, if similar, from the same source; and, where a fragment of an ancient historian is found to resemble a passage in Diodorus, that historian is assumed to be the source employed by Diodorus in that passage; finally, when a sufficient mosaic of such details is pieced (...)
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  11.  23
    τò Μηδικóν and τά Μηδικά.N. G. L. Hammond - 1957 - The Classical Review 7 (02):100-101.
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  12.  14
    A Commentary on Thucydides.N. G. L. Hammond - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (01):30-.
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  13.  15
    Athenian Democracy.N. G. L. Hammond - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (01):41-.
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  14.  13
    An Eclectic Greek History.N. G. L. Hammond - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (03):262-.
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  15.  20
    A Local History.N. G. L. Hammond - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (03):313-.
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  16.  13
    A Note on 'Pursuit' in Arrian.N. G. L. Hammond - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):136-.
    Arrian was better qualified to understand the nature and significance of ‘the pursuit’ in Macedonian warfare than any modern scholar. He had himself fought and commanded in a very similar kind of warfare, and he was keenly interested in the study of military tactics. He was also better informed about the pursuits which Alexander had conducted, because he was able to use the accounts of Alexander's contemporaries, Ptolemy and Aristobulus. Anyone today who wishes to question the veracity of Arrian's reports (...)
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  17.  15
    A Note on ‘Pursuit’ in Arrian.N. G. L. Hammond - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (1):136-140.
    Arrian was better qualified to understand the nature and significance of ‘the pursuit’ in Macedonian warfare than any modern scholar. He had himself fought and commanded in a very similar kind of warfare, and he was keenly interested in the study of military tactics. He was also better informed about the pursuits which Alexander had conducted, because he was able to use the accounts of Alexander's contemporaries, Ptolemy and Aristobulus. Anyone today who wishes to question the veracity of Arrian's reports (...)
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  18.  2
    Aspects of Alexander's Journal and Ring in his last Days.N. G. L. Hammond - 1989 - American Journal of Philology 110 (1).
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  19.  18
    Connotations of 'Macedonia' and of 'Macedones' until 323 b.c.N. G. L. Hammond - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):120-.
    It was a characteristic of Macedonian custom that a name was used in a special and in a general sense. For example, ‘Foot-Companions’ was the name of a Bodyguard of Philip and also of the men of the Phalanx-Brigades from Lower Macedonia, and ‘Hypaspists’ was the name of Infantry-Guardsmen of Alexander and also of the men of three Hypaspist Phalanx-Brigades. Geographical names were repeated: there were at least two regions and two cities called ‘Emathia’, two or three regions called ‘Doberus’, (...)
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  20.  22
    Diodorus Book III.N. G. L. Hammond - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):37-.
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  21.  23
    Dependent States in Greece.N. G. L. Hammond - 1960 - The Classical Review 10 (01):52-.
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  22.  21
    Diodorus Siculus XIX.N. G. L. Hammond - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (01):16-.
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  23.  29
    Enter Demos.N. G. L. Hammond - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (01):90-.
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  24.  19
    Greece and Persia.N. G. L. Hammond - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (03):368-.
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  25.  51
    Illyrians and Epirotes.N. G. L. Hammond - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (02):294-.
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  26.  25
    L. Tasolambros: Θουκυδίδη τὸ πρτο κεφαλαîο. Pp. 91. Athens: Privately printed, 1967. Paper.N. G. L. Hammond - 1969 - The Classical Review 19 (01):118-119.
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  27.  30
    Marathon.N. G. L. Hammond - 1961 - The Classical Review 11 (03):262-.
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  28.  24
    Macedonian Studies.N. G. L. Hammond - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (03):270-.
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  29.  6
    Political Developments in Boeotia.N. G. L. Hammond - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):80-.
    In this article I try to give a precise meaning to the political terms which are used in the sources, and to use those terms for an understanding of political developments. I take these developments in their historical order, and at the end of each period I assess the value of the evidence. I finish with reflection on the contributory system and the hegemony of the Thebans.
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  30.  21
    Religion in Greek Warfare.N. G. L. Hammond - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (02):238-.
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  31.  11
    Strategia and Hegemonia in Fifth-Century Athens.N. G. L. Hammond - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (01):111-.
    Those who have studied the Athenian system of command in the fifth century have confined themselves almost entirely to the period after 440 B.C. They have raked over the evidence to discover signs of double representation of one tribe on the board of strategi, or of a supreme among the or of a chairman at least of the board of strategi. On the other hand little attention is paid to the progressive diminution of the military functions of the archon polemarchus (...)
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  32.  7
    Strategia and Hegemonia in Fifth-Century Athens.N. G. L. Hammond - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (1):111-144.
    Those who have studied the Athenian system of command in the fifth century have confined themselves almost entirely to the period after 440 B.C. They have raked over the evidence to discover signs of double representation of one tribe on the board of strategi, or of a supreme among the or of a chairman at least of the board of strategi. On the other hand little attention is paid to the progressive diminution of the military functions of the archon polemarchus (...)
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  33.  17
    Slings and Stones.N. G. L. Hammond - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):375-.
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  34.  33
    Solon Karl Hönn: Solon, Staatsmann und Weiser. Pp.244; 24 plates. Vienna: Seidel, 1948. Boards, $3.50.N. G. L. Hammond - 1950 - The Classical Review 64 (01):29-30.
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  35.  17
    Some Passages in Arrian Concerning Alexander.N. G. L. Hammond - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (02):455-.
    ‘Alexander, it is said, starting from Amphipolis and keeping on his left the city Philippi and the mountain Orbelus, invaded Thrace, that part occupied by the so-called self-governing Thracians. He crossed the river Nestus, and in ten days, they say, he reached the mountain Haemus.’.
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  36.  18
    Some Passages in Arrian Concerning Alexander.N. G. L. Hammond - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (2):455-476.
    ‘Alexander, it is said, starting from Amphipolis and keeping on his left the city Philippi and the mountain Orbelus, invaded Thrace, that part occupied by the so-called self-governing Thracians. He crossed the river Nestus, and in ten days, they say, he reached the mountain Haemus.’.
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  37.  26
    Thermopylae.N. G. L. Hammond - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (03):316-.
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  38.  26
    The Archaeological and Literary Evidence for the Burning of the Persepolis Palace.N. G. L. Hammond - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (02):358-.
    Recent excavations in Macedonia have provided an analogy to the pillaging of the Palace at Persepolis. In plundered tombs at Aiani the excavators found a number of small gold discs with impressed rosettes and of gilded silver ivy leaves; at Katerini some thirty-five gold discs with impressed rosettes, a gold double pin, a gold ring from a sword-hilt, a bit of a gilded pectoral, gilded silver fittings once attached to a leather cuirass, many buttons and other fragments; and at Palatitsia (...)
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  39.  4
    The Arrangement of the Thought in the Proem and in other Parts of Thucydides I.N. G. L. Hammond - 1952 - Classical Quarterly 2 (3-4):127-.
    Anyone who reads the opening chapters of Thucydides’ history consecutively will soon find it difficult to follow the thread of the argument. If he turns to a summary of the subjects chapter by chapter, he will not be greatly enlightened. In this paper the question is asked: why did Thucydides arrange his subjects as he did? In Part I the conclusion is reached that in the arrangement of his subject-matter he was following a clear-cut system. In Part II the implications (...)
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  40.  25
    The Athenaion Politeia.N. G. L. Hammond - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (01):34-.
  41.  24
    The Branchidae at Didyma and in Sogdiana.N. G. L. Hammond - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):339-344.
    On the subject of the Branchidae there are a few facts and some outstanding questions. The facts may be stated first. They are provided by literary evidence and one piece of archaeological evidence, which are generally accepted.
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  42.  15
    The Budé Diodorus.N. G. L. Hammond - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (01):20-.
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  43.  4
    The Composition of Thucydides' History.N. G. L. Hammond - 1940 - Classical Quarterly 34 (3-4):146-.
    The problem of the composition of Thucydides' History, first raised by Ullrich in 1846, has evoked a mass of controversial literature. In this article I shall confine myself to the main arguments and conclusions. Thucydides' history is unfinished, not only because it breaks off at 411 b.c., but also because the style is uneven. The history of the Archidamian War to 424 b.c. and of the Sicilian War is fully polished and complete; the remainder is lacking in stylistic finish and (...)
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  44.  5
    The Exegetai in Plato's Laws.N. G. L. Hammond - 1952 - Classical Quarterly 2 (1-2):4-.
    ‘As regards the exegetai three let the four tribes nominate four each from their own personnel, and let them scrutinize whichever three gain most votes and send nine to Delphi to appoint one from each group of three; the scrutiny and the age-qualification shall be the same for them as for the priests. Let these be exegetai for life; as regards a vacancy let the preliminary election be made by the four tribes in which the vacancy may occur.’.
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  45.  36
    The Geography of Greece.N. G. L. Hammond - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (3-4):221-.
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  46.  14
    Thucydides, I. 142. 2–4.N. G. L. Hammond - 1947 - The Classical Review 61 (02):39-41.
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  47.  40
    The King and the Land in the Macedonian Kingdom.N. G. L. Hammond - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):382-.
    Two recently published inscriptions afford new insights into this subject. They were published separately and independently within a year or two of one another. Much is now to be gained by considering them together. The first inscription, found at Philippi in 1936, published by C. Vatin in Proc. 8th Epigr. Conf. , 259–70, and published with a fuller commentary by L. Missitzis in The Ancient World 12 , 3–14, records the decision by Alexander the Great on the use of lands (...)
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  48.  15
    The Loeb Diodorus.N. G. L. Hammond - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (02):157-.
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  49.  20
    The Laws of Solon.N. G. L. Hammond - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (01):36-.
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  50.  24
    The Persian Wars without Herodotus.N. G. L. Hammond - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (01):79-.
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