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  1.  11
    Involving Study Populations in the Review of Genetic Research.Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):41-51.
    Research on human genetic variation can present collective risks to all members of a socially identifiable group. Research that associates race or ethnicity with a genetic disposition to disease, for example, presents risks of group discrimination and stigmatization. To better protect against these risks, some have proposed supplemental community-based reviews of research on genetic differences between populations. The assumption behind these appeals is that involving members of study populations in the review process can help to identify and minimize collective risks (...)
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  2.  7
    Involving Study Populations in the Review of Genetic Research.Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):41-51.
    Research on human genetic variation can present collective risks to all members of a socially identifiable group. Research that associates race or ethnicity with a genetic disposition to disease, for example, presents risks of group discrimination and stigmatization. To better protect against these risks, some have proposed supplemental community-based reviews of research on genetic differences between populations. The assumption behind these appeals is that involving members of study populations in the review process can help to identify and minimize collective risks (...)
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  3.  15
    Clinical Utility and Full Disclosure of Genetic Results to Research Participants.Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):42 – 44.
  4.  26
    Grappling with Groups: Protecting Collective Interests in Biomedical Research.Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (4):321 – 337.
    Strategies for protecting historically disadvantaged groups have been extensively debated in the context of genetic variation research, making this a useful starting point in examining the protection of social groups from harm resulting from biomedical research. We analyze research practices developed in response to concerns about the involvement of indigenous communities in studies of genetic variation and consider their potential application in other contexts. We highlight several conceptual ambiguities and practical challenges associated with the protection of group interests and argue (...)
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  5.  9
    Analyzing the Use of Race and Ethnicity in Biomedical Research From a Local Community Perspective.Morris W. Foster - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):508-512.
    Lost in the debate over the use of racial and ethnic categories in biomedical research is community-level analysis of how these categories function and influence health. Such analysis offers a powerful critique of national and transnational categories usually used in biomedical research such as “African-American” and “Native American.” Ethnographic research on local African-American and Native American communities in Oklahoma shows the importance of community-level analysis. Local health practices tend to be shared by members of an everyday interactional community without regard (...)
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  6.  10
    Everything Old is New Again, Including Systems Biology.Morris W. Foster - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):85-86.
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    Analyzing the Use of Race and Ethnicity in Biomedical Research From a Local Community Perspective.Morris W. Foster - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):508-512.
    Most discussions of the use of race and ethnicity in biomedical research and clinical care focus on broad national and transnational populations. Looking at the problem from the perspective of large populations, however, misses the rest of a continuum that runs from the global human population to local communities. If race and ethnicity are fundamental categories for biomedical analyses, they should be informative at all points along that continuum, much as the definition of a gene remains unchanged whether analyzed in (...)
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  8.  2
    Research With Identifiable and Targeted Communities.Morris W. Foster - 2008 - In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 6--475.
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