Order:
See also
Mor Segev
University of South Florida
  1.  4
    Aristotle on Religion.Mor Segev - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle is a severe critic of traditional religion, believing it to be false, yet he also holds that traditional religion and its institutions are necessary if any city, including the ideal city he describes in the Politics, is to exist and flourish. This book provides, for the first time, a coherent account of the socio-political role which Aristotle attributes to traditional religion despite his rejection of its content. Mor Segev argues that Aristotle thinks traditional religion is politically necessary because it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  13
    Aristotle on the Proper Attitude Toward True Divinity.Mor Segev - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):187-209.
    Aristotle does not explicitly state how it is that one should ideally relate to the true gods of his metaphysics, like the prime mover. He does, however, speak of an unreciprocated relationship of friendship between humans and such gods. I argue that Aristotle’s conception of the magnanimous person sheds light on that relationship. The magnanimous person, who is a philosopher, devalues humanity and devotes her life and efforts to the divine. Thus, contrary to some scholars, Aristotle’s conception of magnanimity resembles (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  37
    Aristotle on Nature, Human Nature and Human Understanding.Mor Segev - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (2):177-209.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Rhizomata Jahrgang: 5 Heft: 2 Seiten: 177-209.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  10
    Traditional Religion and Its Natural Function in Aristotle.Mor Segev - 2018 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (3):295-320.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  62
    The Teleological Significance of Dreaming in Aristotle.Mor Segev - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:107-141.
    In his discussions of dreaming in the Parva Naturalia, Aristotle neither claims nor denies that dreams serve a natural purpose. Modern scholarship generally interprets dreaming as useless and teleologically irrelevant for him. I argue that Aristotle's teleology permits certain types of dream to have a natural role in end-directed processes. Dreams are left-overs from waking experience, but they may, like certain bodily residues, be used by nature, which does ‘nothing in vain’ and makes use of available resources, for the benefit (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. ‘Obviously all this Agrees with my Will and my Intellect’: Schopenhauer on Active and PassiveNousin Aristotle'sDe Animaiii.5.Mor Segev - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):535-556.
    In one of the unpublished parts of his manuscript titled the Spicilegia, Arthur Schopenhauer presents an uncharacteristically sympathetic reading of an Aristotelian text. The text in question, De anima III. 5, happens to include the only occurrence of arguably the most controversial idea in Aristotle, namely the distinction between active and passive nous. Schopenhauer interprets these two notions as corresponding to his own notions of the ?will? and the ?intellect? or ?subject of knowledge?, respectively. The result is a unique interpretation, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  4
    The Value of the World and of Oneself: Philosophical Optimism and Pessimism From Aristotle to Modernity.Mor Segev - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    "This book examines the longstanding debate between philosophical optimism and pessimism in the history of philosophy, focusing on Aristotle, Maimonides, Spinoza, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Camus. Philosophical optimists maintain that the world is optimally arranged and is accordingly valuable, and that the existence of human beings is preferable over their nonexistence. Philosophical pessimists, by contrast, hold that the world is in a woeful condition and ultimately valueless, and that human nonexistence would have been preferable over our existence. Schopenhauer criticizes the optimism (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  6
    The Value of the World and of Oneself: Philosophical Optimism and Pessimism From Aristotle, Maimonides, Spinoza, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Camus.Mor Segev - 2022
    "This book examines the longstanding debate between philosophical optimism and pessimism in the history of philosophy, focusing on Aristotle, Maimonides, Spinoza, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Camus. Philosophical optimists maintain that the world is optimally arranged and is accordingly valuable, and that the existence of human beings is preferable over their nonexistence. Philosophical pessimists, by contrast, hold that the world is in a woeful condition and ultimately valueless, and that human nonexistence would have been preferable over our existence. Schopenhauer criticizes the optimism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Summaries and Comments.Elizabeth C. Shaw & Mor Segev - 2022 - Review of Metaphysics 75 (3):587-588.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  17
    Aristotle on Plato’s Republic VIII-IX: Politics v. 12, 1316a1-b27.Mor Segev - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):374-400.
    Toward the end of Politics V. 12, Aristotle criticizes Plato’s discussion of political change in Republic VIII-IX. Scholars often reject Aristotle’s criticism, especially because it portrays Plato’s discussion, allegedly unfairly, as developing a historically testable theory. I argue that Aristotle’s criticism is adequate, and that the seriousness with which he considers Plato’s account of political change as an alternative to his own is both warranted and instructive. First, apart from criticizing Plato’s account for its historical inaccuracies, Aristotle also exposes theoretical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  10
    Aristotle's ideal city-planning: Politics 7.12.Mor Segev - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):585-596.
    At Pol. 7.12, 1331a19–20, Aristotle states it as a matter of fact that the citizenry of the best city should be divided into ‘public messes’. His primary concern in the rest of the chapter is to uncover the optimal way in which syssitia should be organized, and the way in which they should be situated in relation to other facilities, public buildings, agorai and temples in the city. The proposed plan is roughly as follows. Syssitia would be divided into three (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark