19 found
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  1.  18
    Academic freedom under siege.Nancy S. Jecker, Marcel Verweij, Vardit Ravitsky, Tenzin Wangmo & Mohammed Ghaly - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    This paper describes a global pattern of declining academic freedom, often driven by powerful political interference with core functions of academic communities. It argues that countering threats to academic freedom requires doubling down on ethics, specifically standards of justice and fairness in pursuing knowledge and assigning warrant to beliefs. Using the example of the selection of a Qatari university to host the 2024 World Congress of Bioethics, the authors urge fairness towards diverse groups over time and efforts to counter injustices (...)
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  2. Islamic bioethics in the twenty‐first century.Mohammed Ghaly - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):592-599.
    Islamic bioethics is in good health, this article argues. During the twentieth century, academic researchers had to deal with a number of difficulties including the scarcity of available Islamic sources. However, the twenty-first century witnessed significant breakthroughs in the field of Islamic bioethics. A growing number of normative works authored by Muslim religious scholars and studies conducted by academic researchers have been published. This nascent field also proved to be appealing for research-funding institutions in the Muslim world and also in (...)
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  3. Human cloning through the eyes of muslim scholars: The new phenomenon of the islamic international religioscientific institutions.Mohammed Ghaly - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):7-35.
    . In the wake of the February 1997 announcement that Dolly the sheep had been cloned, Muslim religious scholars together with Muslim scientists held two conferences to discuss cloning from an Islamic perspective. They were organized by two influential Islamic international religioscientific institutions: the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences and the International Islamic Fiqh Academy. Both institutions comprise a large number of prominent religious scholars and well‐known scientists who participated in the discussions at the conferences. This article gives a comprehensive (...)
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  4.  16
    Bioethics and the thorny question of diversity: The example of Qatar‐based institutions hosting the World Congress of Bioethics 2024.Mohammed Ghaly, Maha El Akoum & Sultana Afdhal - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (4):326-330.
    In 2022, the Research Center for Islamic Legislation & Ethics (CILE) and the World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) submitted a proposal to host the 17th edition of the World Congress of Bioethics. After announcing that the CILE‐WISH proposal was the winning bid, concerns were raised by bioethicists based in Europe and the USA. To address these concerns, the International Association of Bioethics (IAB) developed a dedicated FAQ section, in coordination with the host institutions, for the first time in IAB (...)
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  5. The beginning of human life: Islamic bioethical perspectives.Mohammed Ghaly - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):175-213.
    Abstract. In January 1985, about 80 Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists gathered in a symposium held in Kuwait to discuss the broad question “When does human life begin?” This article argues that this symposium is one of the milestones in the field of contemporary Islamic bioethics and independent legal reasoning (Ijtihād). The proceedings of the symposium, however, escaped the attention of academic researchers. This article is meant to fill in this research lacuna by analyzing the proceedings of this symposium, (...)
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  6.  23
    Sunni Islamic perspectives on lab-grown sperm and eggs derived from stem cells – in vitro gametogenesis (IVG).Gamal Serour, Mohammed Ghaly, Shaikh Mohd Saifuddeen, Ayaz Anwar, Noor Munirah Isa & Alexis Heng Boon Chin - 2022 - The New Bioethics 29 (2):108-120.
    An exciting development in the field of assisted reproductive technologies is In Vitro Gametogenesis (IVG) that enables production of functional gametes from stem cells in the laboratory. Currently, development of this technology is still at an early stage and has demonstrated to work only in rodents. Upon critically examining the ethical dimensions of various possible IVG applications in human fertility treatment from a Sunni Islamic perspective, together with benefit-harm (maslahah-mafsadah) assessment; it is concluded that utilization of IVG, once its efficacy (...)
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  7.  47
    What Makes Work “Good” in the Age of Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Islamic Perspectives on AI-Mediated Work Ethics.Mohammed Ghaly - forthcoming - The Journal of Ethics:1-25.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are increasingly creeping into the work sphere, thereby gradually questioning and/or disturbing the long-established moral concepts and norms communities have been using to define what makes work good. Each community, and Muslims make no exception in this regard, has to revisit their moral world to provide well-thought frameworks that can engage with the challenging ethical questions raised by the new phenomenon of AI-mediated work. For a systematic analysis of the broad topic of AI-mediated work ethics from (...)
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  8.  81
    Collective religio‐scientific discussions on Islam and hiv/aids: I. Biomedical scientists.Mohammed Ghaly - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):671-708.
    During the 1990s, biomedical scientists and Muslim religious scholars collaborated to construe Islamic responses for the ethical questions raised by the AIDS pandemic. This is the first of a two-part study examining this collective legal reasoning (ijtihād jamā‘ī). The main thesis is that the role of the biomedical scientists is not limited to presenting scientific information. They engaged in the human rights discourse pertinent to people living with HIV/AIDS, gave an account of the preventive strategy adopted by the World Health (...)
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  9.  7
    Islamic perspectives on the principles of biomedical ethics: Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists in face-to-face dialogue with western bioethicists.Mohammed Ghaly (ed.) - 2016 - Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific, Imperial College Press.
    Islamic Perspectives on the Principles of Biomedical Ethics presents results from a pioneering seminar in 2013 between Muslim religious scholars, biomedical scientists, and Western bioethicists at the research Center for Islamic Legislation & Ethics, Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies. By examining principle-based bioethics, the contributors to this volume addressed a number of key issues related to the future of the field. Discussion is based around the role of religion in bioethical reasoning, specifically from an Islamic perspective. Also considered is a (...)
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  10.  29
    Islamic Bioethics: The Inevitable Interplay of 'Texts' and 'Contexts'.Mohammed Ghaly - 2013 - Bioethics 28 (2):49-58.
    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumayʽ (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio‐ethical implications of these Graeco‐Islamic‐Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al‐Dīn al‐Qarāfī (d. (...)
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  11.  28
    End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition.Mohammed Ghaly (ed.) - 2023 - Boston: Brill.
    Modern biomedical technologies managed to revolutionise the End-of-Life Care (EoLC) in many aspects. The dying process can now be "engineered" by managing the accompanying physical symptoms or by "prolonging/hastening" death itself. Such interventions questioned and problematised long-established understandings of key moral concepts, such as good life, quality of life, pain, suffering, good death, appropriate death, dying well, etc. This volume examines how multifaceted EoLC moral questions can be addressed from interdisciplinary perspectives within the Islamic tradition. Contributors Amir Abbas Alizamani, Beate (...)
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  12. Introduction: End-of-Life Care in the Islamic Moral Tradition.Mohammed Ghaly - 2023 - In End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  13.  29
    Milk Banks through the lens of muslim scholars: One text in two contexts.Mohammed Ghaly - 2010 - Bioethics 26 (3):117-127.
    When Muslims thought of establishing milk banks, religious reservations were raised. These reservations were based on the concept that women's milk creates ‘milk kinship’ believed to impede marriage in Islamic Law. This type of kinship is, however, a distinctive phenomenon of Arab tradition and relatively unknown in Western cultures. This article is a pioneer study which fathoms out the contemporary discussions of Muslim scholars on this issue. The main focus here is a religious guideline (fatwa) issued in 1983, referred to (...)
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  14. Part III. End-of-Life Care as a Bioethical Issue: 7. Palliative Care and Its Ethical Questions: Islamic Perspectives.Mohammed Ghaly - 2023 - In End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  15.  45
    Pre‐modern Islamic Medical Ethics and Graeco‐Islamic‐Jewish Embryology.Mohammed Ghaly - 2013 - Bioethics 28 (2):49-58.
    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumayʽ (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio-ethical implications of these Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al-Dīn al-Qarāfī (d. (...)
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  16. Part I. Methodological Issues: 1. End-of-Life Care, Dying and Death Islamic Ethics, A Primer.Mohammed Ghaly - 2023 - In End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  17.  64
    The ethics of organ transplantation: how comprehensive the ethical framework should be?Mohammed Ghaly - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):175-179.
  18.  26
    The Interplay of Technology and Sacredness in Islam: Discussions of Muslim Scholars on Printing the Qur'an.Mohammed Ghaly - 2009 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (2).
    In the midst of available studies on the relation between technology or science and religion, one of the vital and early episodes of this relation within the Islamic tradition did not receive the due attention from modern researchers. This episode has to do with the discussions of Muslim scholars on using the then emerging technology of printing to reproduce the sacred scripture of Muslims, namely, the Qur'an. The main discussions among the ‘ulama on this issue took place in the eighteenth (...)
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  19.  94
    Religio-ethical discussions on organ donation among Muslims in Europe: an example of transnational Islamic bioethics. [REVIEW]Mohammed Ghaly - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):207-220.
    This article analyzes the religio-ethical discussions of Muslim religious scholars, which took place in Europe specifically in the UK and the Netherlands, on organ donation. After introductory notes on fatwas (Islamic religious guidelines) relevant to biomedical ethics and the socio-political context in which discussions on organ donation took place, the article studies three specific fatwas issued in Europe whose analysis has escaped the attention of modern academic researchers. In 2000 the European Council for Fatwa and Research (ECFR) issued a fatwa (...)
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