Results for 'Mike Hannis'

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  1.  40
    The Virtues of Acknowledged Ecological Dependence: Sustainability, Autonomy and Human Flourishing.Mike Hannis - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (2):145-164.
    An extension of Alasdair MacIntyre's concept of 'virtues of acknowledged dependence', to include relationships with the non-human world, offers an organising principle for environmental virtue ethics. It situates ecological virtue among more traditional virtues of inter-human relationships, and may thereby contribute to an ethical reconciliation of policies aimed at encouraging ecological virtue with those aimed at protecting the freedoms required for personal autonomy. Within this eudaimonist framework, ecological virtue may be understood and promoted as directly contributing to a good life.
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  2. Virtue Is Good for You: The Politics of Ecological Eudaimonism.Mike Hannis - 2020 - In Heesoon Bai, David Chang & Charles Scott (eds.), A book of ecological virtues: living well in the anthropocene. Regina, Saskatchewan: University of Regina Press.
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  3.  98
    The strategic use of questions in court.Hanni Woodbury - 1984 - Semiotica 48 (3-4).
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  4. Mensch, woher, wohin? Ortmann, Hanni & [From Old Catalog] (eds.) - 1959 - Berlin,: Verlag Neues Leben.
     
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  5. Radical Interpretation and High-Functioning Autistic Speakers: a Defense of Davidson on Thought and Language.Hanni K. Bouma - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (5):639-662.
    Donald Davidson argues in "Thought and Talk" that all speakers must be interpreters of other speakers: linguistic competence requires the possession of intentional concepts and the ability to attribute intentional states to other people. Kristin Andrews (in Philosophical Psychology, 15) has argued that empirical evidence about autism undermines this theoretical claim, for some individuals with autism lack the requisite "theory of mind" skills to be able to interpret, yet are competent speakers. In this paper, Davidson is defended on the grounds (...)
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  6.  9
    An open letter to ayatollah hashemi-shahroudi from human rights watch.Megally Hanny - 2000 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 67 (4):5.
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  7.  40
    Is Empathy Necessary for the Practice of “Good” Medicine.Hanni K. Bouma - 2008 - Open Ethics Journal 2 (1):1-12.
  8.  50
    High-functioning autistic speakers as Davidsonian interpreters: A reply to Andrews and radenovic.Hanni K. Bouma - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (5):679 – 690.
    In this paper, I provide further support for my earlier claim that the existence of high-functioning autistic speakers does not undermine Davidson's theory of radical interpretation. Andrews and Radenovic, in criticizing my arguments for this position, have presented fresh evidence from the clinical literature on autism for the existence of an individual who speaks but does not interpret, and maintain that the existence of such an individual seriously challenges Davidson's theory. I counter this claim by showing that the evidence they (...)
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  9.  81
    Bayesian Rationality: The Probabilistic Approach to Human Reasoning.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Are people rational? This question was central to Greek thought and has been at the heart of psychology and philosophy for millennia. This book provides a radical and controversial reappraisal of conventional wisdom in the psychology of reasoning, proposing that the Western conception of the mind as a logical system is flawed at the very outset. It argues that cognition should be understood in terms of probability theory, the calculus of uncertain reasoning, rather than in terms of logic, the calculus (...)
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  10.  70
    Conservative AI and social inequality: conceptualizing alternatives to bias through social theory.Mike Zajko - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (3):1047-1056.
    In response to calls for greater interdisciplinary involvement from the social sciences and humanities in the development, governance, and study of artificial intelligence systems, this paper presents one sociologist’s view on the problem of algorithmic bias and the reproduction of societal bias. Discussions of bias in AI cover much of the same conceptual terrain that sociologists studying inequality have long understood using more specific terms and theories. Concerns over reproducing societal bias should be informed by an understanding of the ways (...)
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  11.  36
    Corporate Philanthropy and Risk Management: An Investigation of Reinsurance and Charitable Giving in Insurance Firms.Mike Adams, Stefan Hoejmose & Zafeira Kastrinaki - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (1):1-37.
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  12.  29
    Towards an Appreciation of Ethics in Social Enterprise Business Models.Mike Bull & Rory Ridley-Duff - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (3):619-634.
    How can a critical analysis of entrepreneurial intention inform an appreciation of ethics in social enterprise business models? In answering this question, we consider the ethical commitments that inform entrepreneurial action and the hybrid organisations that emerge out of these commitments and actions. Ethical theory can be a useful way to reorient the field of social enterprise so that it is more critical of bureaucratic and market-driven enterprises connected to neoliberal doctrine. Social enterprise hybrid business models are therefore reframed as (...)
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  13. Connectionist modelling in psychology: A localist manifesto.Mike Page - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):443-467.
    Over the last decade, fully distributed models have become dominant in connectionist psychological modelling, whereas the virtues of localist models have been underestimated. This target article illustrates some of the benefits of localist modelling. Localist models are characterized by the presence of localist representations rather than the absence of distributed representations. A generalized localist model is proposed that exhibits many of the properties of fully distributed models. It can be applied to a number of problems that are difficult for fully (...)
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  14. What's Puzzling Gottlob Frege?Mike Thau & Ben Caplan - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):159-200.
    By any reasonable reckoning, Gottlob Frege's ‘On Sense and Reference’ is one of the more important philosophical papers of all time. Although Frege briefly discusses the sense-reference distinction in an earlier work, it is through ‘Sense and Reference’ that most philosophers have become familiar with it. And the distinction so thoroughly permeates contemporary philosophy of language and mind that it is almost impossible to imagine these subjects without it.The distinction between the sense and the referent of a name is introduced (...)
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  15. What is hegemonic masculinity?Mike Donaldson - 1993 - Theory and Society 22 (5):643-657.
  16.  59
    A rational analysis of the selection task as optimal data selection.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (4):608-631.
  17.  47
    What’s the Problem with the Cosmological Constant?Mike D. Schneider - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (1):1-20.
    The “Cosmological Constant Problem” is widely considered a crisis in contemporary theoretical physics. Unfortunately, the search for its resolution is hampered by open disagreement about what is, strictly, the problem. This disagreement stems from the observation that the CCP is not a problem within any of our current theories, and nearly all of the details of those future theories for which the CCP could be made a problem are up for grabs. Given this state of affairs, I discuss how one (...)
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  18.  62
    Mind in life or life in mind? Making sense of deep continuity.Mike Wheeler - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (5-6):148-168.
  19.  18
    After the crisis? Big Data and the methodological challenges of empirical sociology.Mike Savage & Roger Burrows - 2014 - Big Data and Society 1 (1).
    Google Trends reveals that at the time we were writing our article on ‘The Coming Crisis of Empirical Sociology’ in 2007 almost nobody was searching the internet for ‘Big Data’. It was only towards the very end of 2010 that the term began to register, just ahead of an explosion of interest from 2011 onwards. In this commentary we take the opportunity to reflect back on the claims we made in that original paper in light of more recent discussions about (...)
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  20. The Epistemological Basis of Engineering, and Its Reflection in the Modern Engineering Curriculum.Mike Murphy & William Grimson - 2015 - In Byron Newberry, Carl Mitcham, Martin Meganck, Andrew Jamison, Christelle Didier & Steen Hyldgaard Christensen (eds.), Engineering Identities, Epistemologies and Values: Engineering Education and Practice in Context. Springer Verlag.
     
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  21. Locke's Answer to Molyneux's Thought Experiment.Mike Bruno & Eric Mandelbaum - 2010 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (2):165-80.
    Philosophical discussions of Molyneux's problem within contemporary philosophy of mind tend to characterize the problem as primarily concerned with the role innately known principles, amodal spatial concepts, and rational cognitive faculties play in our perceptual lives. Indeed, for broadly similar reasons, rationalists have generally advocated an affirmative answer, while empiricists have generally advocated a negative one, to the question Molyneux posed after presenting his famous thought experiment. This historical characterization of the dialectic, however, somewhat obscures the role Molyneux's problem has (...)
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  22.  44
    H. C. for life, That Is to Say .Alexia Hannis - 2007 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 11 (2):479-485.
  23.  29
    Imagining New Social Legal Futures: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Pre-Law Students’ Experiences with Discourse Communities of Legal Practice.Courtney Hanny - 2016 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (1):87-120.
    This paper considers the ways that concepts such as social justice and law were used as semiotic objects-in-tension by a group of five US undergraduates considering law school to make sense of their ideas about entering the discourse communities and communities of practice associated with being a lawyer. This group was made up of undergraduate women who had completed a summer residency program sponsored by the Law School Admissions Council to increase enrollment of students from under-represented groups. Of the five (...)
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  24.  38
    EcoJustice as Ecological Literacy is Much More than Being “Green!”.Mike Mueller - 2008 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 44 (2):155-166.
  25.  33
    metaSEM: an R package for meta-analysis using structural equation modeling.Mike W.-L. Cheung - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  26. Disagreement.Mike Ridge - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):41-63.
    Disagreement holds the key: the possibility of agreeing or disagreeing with a state of mind makes that state of mind act logically like accepting a claim. Charles Stevenson was quite right to begin his presentation of emotivism with disagreement.—Allan Gibbard.
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  27.  46
    Mike Boone, Kathleen Fite, & Robert F. Reardon 43.Mike Boone - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  28.  14
    What Now?Mike Abell - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (1):16-18.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:What Now?Mike AbellThe cry broke the church’s uncomfortable silence. It actually was more of a moan than a cry. It was deeper, coming from her core. I’d heard it only once before and knew it as a sound caused by a loss that will never be recovered. No one in the church had to turn to discover its source. We all knew the mother had entered to say (...)
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  29. Précis of bayesian rationality: The probabilistic approach to human reasoning.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):69-84.
    According to Aristotle, humans are the rational animal. The borderline between rationality and irrationality is fundamental to many aspects of human life including the law, mental health, and language interpretation. But what is it to be rational? One answer, deeply embedded in the Western intellectual tradition since ancient Greece, is that rationality concerns reasoning according to the rules of logic – the formal theory that specifies the inferential connections that hold with certainty between propositions. Piaget viewed logical reasoning as defining (...)
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  30.  27
    Cosmopolitan Climates.Mike Hulme - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (2-3):267-276.
    This essay argues for the fruitfulness of Beck’s idea of cosmopolitanism for understanding the changing political, sociological and psychological attributes of climate change. This argument is illustrated through brief examinations of how climate change is contributing to the dissolution of three modern dualisms: nature-culture, present-future and global-local. Not only does the cosmopolitan perspective help to understand the ways in which science and society are mutually constructing the phenomenon of climate change, it also offers us a way of asking ‘what can (...)
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  31.  92
    Against Logicist Cognitive Science.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 1991 - Mind and Language 6 (1):1-38.
  32.  41
    Toward an Ethics of Algorithms: Convening, Observation, Probability, and Timeliness.Mike Ananny - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (1):93-117.
    Part of understanding the meaning and power of algorithms means asking what new demands they might make of ethical frameworks, and how they might be held accountable to ethical standards. I develop a definition of networked information algorithms as assemblages of institutionally situated code, practices, and norms with the power to create, sustain, and signify relationships among people and data through minimally observable, semiautonomous action. Starting from Merrill’s prompt to see ethics as the study of “what we ought to do,” (...)
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  33. Defining versus describing the nature of science: A pragmatic analysis for classroom teachers and science educators.Mike U. Smith & Lawrence C. Scharmann - 1999 - Science Education 83 (4):493-509.
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  34. Anthropomorphism as Cognitive Bias.Mike Dacey - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1152-1164.
    Philosophers and psychologists have long worried that the human tendency to anthropomorphize leads us to err in our understanding of nonhuman minds. This tendency, which I call intuitive anthropomorphism, is a heuristic used by our unconscious folk psychology to understand nonhuman animals. The dominant understanding of intuitive anthropomorphism underestimates its complexity. If we want to understand and control intuitive anthropomorphism, we must treat it as a cognitive bias and look to the empirical evidence. This evidence suggests that the most common (...)
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  35.  17
    The Detail of Law Relating to Modern Biotechnology.Mike Adcock & Julian Kinderlerer - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):113-117.
    The ability of science to operate effectively within society is dependant on a number of factors. Science is totally reliant on the law for its regulation and control, while the boundaries in which science can operate are governed by legal constraints. These boundaries are strongly influenced by society which dictates acceptable levels of morals and ethics in which science can operate. Economic factors must be considered as industry requires reward in order to recoup its research and development investments and continue (...)
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  36.  15
    The Detail of Law Relating to Modern Biotechnology.Mike Adcock - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):113-117.
    The ability of science to operate effectively within society is dependant on a number of factors. Science is totally reliant on the law for its regulation and control, while the boundaries in which science can operate are governed by legal constraints. These boundaries are strongly influenced by society which dictates acceptable levels of morals and ethics in which science can operate. Economic factors must be considered as industry requires reward in order to recoup its research and development investments and continue (...)
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  37.  36
    Abpl.Mike Ainsworth - 1993 - Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2):43-51.
    Computer analysis of biological systems, using approaches such as metabolic control analysis is common. A typical example is a language like Herbert Sauro's SCAMP (Sauro & Fell, 1991), which allows simulations of enzyme systems, and calculation of control coefficients and elasticities. However such systems are motivated by the underlying biochemical theory and often have limitations as programming languages which mean that they can only be applied to particular classes of problems.ABPL (a biochemical programming language) extends these ideas by adding all (...)
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  38. 13 Mike Kelley.Mike Kelley - 2007 - In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: key contemporary thinkers. New York: Berg. pp. 13.
     
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  39.  37
    Priority and privilege in scientific discovery.Mike D. Schneider & Hannah Rubin - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 89 (C):202-211.
    The priority rule in science has been interpreted as a behavior regulator for the scientific community, which benefits society by adequately structuring the distribution of intellectual labor across pre-existing research programs. Further, it has been lauded as part of society's "grand reward scheme" because it fairly rewards people for the benefits they produce. But considerations about how news of scientific developments spreads throughout a scientific community at large suggest that the priority rule is something else entirely, which can disadvantage historically (...)
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  40.  27
    Current Status of Research in Teaching and Learning Evolution: II. Pedagogical Issues.Mike U. Smith - 2010 - Science & Education 19 (6-8):539-571.
  41.  23
    Imaginal research for unlearning mastery divination with Tarot as a decolonizing methodology, NOT. Authentic paths towards decolonization.Mike Sosteric, Gina Ratkovic & Tristan Sosteric - 2024 - Anthropology of Consciousness 35 (1):111-122.
    A recent article in Anthropology of Consciousness entitled ‘Imaginal research for unlearning mastery: Divination with Tarot as a decolonizing methodology’ argues that the Western Tarot may be a useful tool to facilitate decolonization despite (or perhaps in spite) of the colonial and imperial imprints of the accumulating class. This response points out the Tarot is in fact a tool developed by the accumulating class, designed specifically to facilitate the imposition of elite master narratives. This letter calls into question the appropriateness (...)
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  42.  45
    Betting on Future Physics.Mike D. Schneider - 2022 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 73 (1):161-183.
    The ‘cosmological constant problem’ has historically been understood as describing a conflict between cosmological observations in the framework of general relativity and theoretical predictions from quantum field theory, which a future theory of quantum gravity ought to resolve. I argue that this view of the CCP is best understood in terms of a bet about future physics made on the basis of particular interpretational choices in GR and QFT, respectively. Crucially, each of these choices must be taken as itself grounded (...)
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  43.  32
    Understanding the Relationship between Language Ability and Plagiarism in Non-native English Speaking Business Students.Mike Perkins, Ulas Basar Gezgin & Jasper Roe - 2018 - Journal of Academic Ethics 16 (4):317-328.
    Despite a continued focus exploring the factors related to plagiarism, the relationship between English language ability and plagiarism occurrences is not fully understood. Multiple studies involving student or faculty self-reporting of plagiarism have shown that students often claim English language ability is one of the main reasons why they commit plagiarism offences; however, little research has tested these claims in a rigorous, quantitative manner. This paper presents the findings of an analysis of data collected in a private, international university located (...)
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  44.  80
    Detection of GPT-4 Generated Text in Higher Education: Combining Academic Judgement and Software to Identify Generative AI Tool Misuse.Mike Perkins, Jasper Roe, Darius Postma, James McGaughran & Don Hickerson - 2024 - Journal of Academic Ethics 22 (1):89-113.
    This study explores the capability of academic staff assisted by the Turnitin Artificial Intelligence (AI) detection tool to identify the use of AI-generated content in university assessments. 22 different experimental submissions were produced using Open AI’s ChatGPT tool, with prompting techniques used to reduce the likelihood of AI detectors identifying AI-generated content. These submissions were marked by 15 academic staff members alongside genuine student submissions. Although the AI detection tool identified 91% of the experimental submissions as containing AI-generated content, only (...)
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  45.  40
    Cognition and Conditionals: Probability and Logic in Human Thought.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This book shows how these developments have led researchers to view people's conditional reasoning behaviour more as succesful probabilistic reasoning rather ...
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  46.  32
    Knowing, believing, and understanding: What goals for science education?Mike U. Smith & Harvey Siegel - 2004 - Science & Education 13 (6):553-582.
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  47. Evil is not Evidence.Mike Almeida - 2022 - Religious Studies 1 (1):1-9.
    The paper aims to show that, if S5 is the logic of metaphysical necessity, then no state of affairs in any possible world constitutes any non-trivial evidence for or against the existence of the traditional God. There might well be states of affairs in some worlds describing extraordinary goods and extraordinary evils, but it is false that these states of affairs constitute any (non-trivial) evidence for or against the existence of God. The epistemological and metaphysical consequences for philosophical theology of (...)
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  48.  14
    Rational Models of Cognition.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book explores a new approach to understanding the human mind - rational analysis - that regards thinking as a facility adapted to the structure of the world. This approach is most closely associated with the work of John R Anderson, who published the original book on rational analysis in 1990. Since then, a great deal of work has been carried out in a number of laboratories around the world, and the aim of this book is to bring this work (...)
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  49.  21
    The ‘Social Life of Methods’: A Critical Introduction.Mike Savage - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (4):3-21.
    This paper explores the distinctive features of the critical agenda associated with the ‘Social Life of Methods’. I argue that although this perspective can be associated with the increasing interest, often associated with scholars in Science and Technology Studies, to reflect on how methods can become objects of inquiry, it also needs to be rooted in the current crisis of positivist methods. I identify the challenge for positivism in terms of the decreasing ability of its procedures to effectively organize increasingly (...)
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  50. The Body in Consumer Culture.Mike Featherstone - 1982 - Theory, Culture and Society 1 (2):18-33.
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