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  1.  33
    Questioning 'Participation': A Critical Appraisal of its Conceptualization in a Flemish Participatory Technology Assessment.Michiel van Oudheusden - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):673-690.
    This article draws attention to struggles inherent in discourse about the meaning of participation in a Flemish participatory technology assessment (pTA) on nanotechnologies. It explores how, at the project’s outset, key actors (e.g., nanotechnologists and pTA researchers) frame elements of the process like ‘the public’ and draw on interpretive repertoires to fit their perspective. The examples call into question normative commitments to cooperation, consensus building, and common action that conventionally guide pTA approaches. It is argued that pTA itself must reflect (...)
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  2.  43
    Participation Beyond Consensus? Technology Assessments, Consensus Conferences and Democratic Modulation.Jeroen Van Bouwel & Michiel Van Oudheusden - 2017 - Social Epistemology 31 (6):497-513.
    In this article, we inquire into two contemporary participatory formats that seek to democratically intervene in scientific practice: the consensus conference and participatory technology assessment. We explain how these formats delegitimize conflict and disagreement by making a strong appeal to consensus. Based on our direct involvement in these formats and informed both by political philosophy and science and technology studies, we outline conceptions that contrast with the consensus ideal, including dissensus, disclosure, conflictual consensus and agonistic democracy. Drawing on the notion (...)
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  3.  3
    Co-Creating Nano-Imaginaries: Report of a Delphi-Exercise.Lieve Goorden, Johan Evers, Michiel Van Oudheusden & Marian Deblonde - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (5):372-389.
    In the first phase of the research project Nanotechnologies for Tomorrow's Society, the research consortium explored a variety of futuristic visions or technoscientific imaginaries. This exploration took the form of a Policy Delphi, adapted to the particular objective of jointly constructing nano-imaginaries, taking participants' personal visions of possible future applications and societal issues as a starting point. The participants were nanoresearchers, as well as societal experts and primary involved citizens. In this article, the authors describe the theoretical frame that inspired (...)
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  4.  2
    Learning From Incidents and Incident Reporting: Safety Governance at a Belgian Nuclear Research Center.Michiel van Oudheusden & Nicolas Rossignol - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (4):679-702.
    This article examines how incidents are governed in a Belgian Nuclear Research Center by way of an incident reporting system named Retour d’Experiences. Drawing on a documentary analysis of incident reports, interviews, and focus groups with personnel, it illustrates how REX enacts a safety governmentality centered on identifying incident causes and culprits. As this governmentality mode obscures the epistemic and political character of incidents, it closes down important opportunities for collective learning about safety and safety governance. It is argued that (...)
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  5.  38
    Lose One Another... And Find One Another in Nanospace. ‘Nanotechnologies for Tomorrow’s Society: A Case for Reflective Action Research in Flanders ’. [REVIEW]Lieve Goorden, Michiel Van Oudheusden, Johan Evers & Marian Deblonde - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):213-230.
    The main objective of the Flemish research project ‘Nanotechnologies for tomorrow’s society’ (NanoSoc) is to develop and try out an interactive process as a suitable methodology for rendering nanoresearchers aware of underlying assumptions that guide nanotech research and integrating social considerations into the research choices they face. In particular, the NanoSoc process should sustain scientists’ capacities to address growing uncertainties on the strategic, scientific and public acceptance level. The article elaborates on these uncertainties and involved dilemmas scientists are facing and (...)
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  6.  1
    Flanders Ahead, Wallonia Behind (But Catching Up): Reconstructing Communities Through Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy Making.Pierre Delvenne, Nathan Charlier & Michiel Van Oudheusden - 2017 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 37 (4):185-198.
    Drawing on a documentary analysis of two socioeconomic policy programs, one Flemish, the other Walloon, and a discourse analysis of how these programs are received in one Flemish and one Francophone quality newspaper, this article illustrates how Flanders and Wallonia both seek to become top-performing knowledge-based economies. The article discerns a number of discursive repertoires, such as “Catching up,” which policy actors draw on to legitimize or question the transformation of Flanders and Wallonia into KBEs. The “Catching up” repertoire places (...)
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