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  1.  34
    On the origins of narrative.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (4):403-425.
    Stories consist largely of representations of the human social environment. These representations can be used to influence the behavior of others (consider, e.g., rumor, propaganda, public relations, advertising). Storytelling can thus be seen as a transaction in which the benefit to the listener is information about his or her environment, and the benefit to the storyteller is the elicitation of behavior from the listener that serves the former’s interests. However, because no two individuals have exactly the same fitness interests, we (...)
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  2.  52
    Narrative theory and function: Why evolution matters.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (2):233-250.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 25.2 (2001) 233-250 [Access article in PDF] Narrative Theory and Function: Why Evolution Matters Michelle Scalise Sugiyama I It may seem a strange proposition that the study of human evolution is integral to the study of literature, yet that is exactly what this paper proposes. The reasons for this are twofold. Firstly, the practice of storytelling is ancient, pre-dating not only the advent of writing, but (...)
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  3.  16
    Ecological and Developmental Perspectives on Social Learning.Helen Elizabeth Davis, Alyssa N. Crittenden & Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):1-15.
    In this special issue of Human Nature we explore the possible adaptive links between teaching and learning during childhood, and we aim to expand the dialogue on the ways in which the social sciences, and in particular current anthropological research, may better inform our shifting understanding of how these processes vary in different social and ecological environments. Despite the cross-disciplinary trend toward incorporating more behavioral and cognitive data outside of postindustrial state societies, much of the published cross-cultural data is presented (...)
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  4.  15
    Coalitional Play Fighting and the Evolution of Coalitional Intergroup Aggression.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama, Marcela Mendoza, Frances White & Lawrence Sugiyama - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):219-244.
    Dyadic play fighting occurs in many species, but only humans are known to engage in coalitional play fighting. Dyadic play fighting is hypothesized to build motor skills involved in actual dyadic fighting; thus, coalitional play fighting may build skills involved in actual coalitional fighting, operationalized as forager lethal raiding. If human psychology includes a motivational component that encourages engagement in this type of play, evidence of this play in forager societies is necessary to determine that it is not an artifact (...)
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  5.  19
    Social roles, prestige, and health risk.Lawrence Scott Sugiyama & Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (2):165-190.
    Selection pressure from health risk is hypothesized to have shaped adaptations motivating individuals to attempt to become valued by other individuals by generously and recurrently providing beneficial goods and/or services to them because this strategy encouraged beneficiaries to provide costly health care to their benefactors when the latter were sick or injured. Additionally, adaptations are hypothesized to have co-evolved that motivate individuals to attend to and value those who recurrently provide them with important benefits so they are willing in turn (...)
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  6.  18
    Toward a Natural History of Team Sports.Kevin M. Kniffin & Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):211-218.
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  7.  44
    Cultural variation is part of human nature.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (4):383-396.
    In 1966, Laura Bohannan wrote her classic essay challenging the supposition that great literary works speak to universal human concerns and conditions and, by extension, that human nature is the same everywhere. Her evidence: the Tiv of West Africa interpret Hamlet differently from Westerners. While Bohannan’s essay implies that cognitive universality and cultural variation are mutually exclusive phenomena, adaptationist theory suggests otherwise. Adaptive problems ("the human condition") and cognitive adaptations ("human nature") are constant across cultures. What differs between cultures is (...)
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  8.  5
    Imaginary worlds pervade forager oral tradition.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e296.
    Imaginary worlds recur across hunter-gatherer narrative, suggesting that they are an ancient part of human life: to understand their popularity, we must examine their origins. Hunter-gatherer fictional narratives use various devices to encode factual information. Thus, participation in these invented worlds, born of our evolved ability to engage in pretense, may provide adaptations with information inputs that scaffold their development.
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