8 found
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  1. Autonomous Driving and Public Reason: a Rawlsian Approach.Claudia Brändle & Michael W. Schmidt - 2021 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (4):1475-1499.
    In this paper, we argue that solutions to normative challenges associated with autonomous driving, such as real-world trolley cases or distributions of risk in mundane driving situations, face the problem of reasonable pluralism: Reasonable pluralism refers to the fact that there exists a plurality of reasonable yet incompatible comprehensive moral doctrines within liberal democracies. The corresponding problem is that a politically acceptable solution cannot refer to only one of these comprehensive doctrines. Yet a politically adequate solution to the normative challenges (...)
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  2. Defining the method of reflective equilibrium.Michael W. Schmidt - 2024 - Synthese 203 (5):1-22.
    The method of reflective equilibrium (MRE) is a method of justification popularized by John Rawls and further developed by Norman Daniels, Michael DePaul, Folke Tersman, and Catherine Z. Elgin, among others. The basic idea is that epistemic agents have justified beliefs if they have succeeded in forming their beliefs into a harmonious system of beliefs which they reflectively judge to be the most plausible. Despite the common reference to MRE as a method, its mechanisms or rules are typically expressed in (...)
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    Implementing AI Ethics in the Design of AI-assisted Rescue Robots.Désirée Martin, Michael W. Schmidt & Rafaela Hillerbrand - 2023 - Ieee International Symposium on Ethics in Engineering, Science, and Technology (Ethics).
    For implementing ethics in AI technology, there are at least two major ethical challenges. First, there are various competing AI ethics guidelines and consequently there is a need for a systematic overview of the relevant values that should be considered. Second, if the relevant values have been identified, there is a need for an indicator system that helps assessing if certain design features are positively or negatively affecting their implementation. This indicator system will vary with regard to specific forms of (...)
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  4. Reflective Equilibrium is enough. Against the need for pre-selecting “considered judgments”.Tanja Rechnitzer & Michael W. Schmidt - 2022 - Ethics, Politics and Society 5 (2):59–79.
    In this paper, we focus on one controversial element of the method of reflective equilibrium, namely Rawls’s idea that the commitments that enter the justificatory procedure should be pre-selected or filtered: According to him, only considered judgements should be taken into account in moral philosophy. There are two camps of critics of this filtering process: 1) Critics of reflective equilibrium: They reject the Rawlsian filtering process as too weak and seek a more reliable one, which would actually constitute a distinct (...)
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  5. Sidgwick, Reflective Equilibrium and the Triviality Charge.Michael W. Schmidt - 2021 - In Michael Schefczyk & Christoph Schmidt-Petri (eds.), Utility, Progress, and Technology: Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the International Society for Utilitarian Studies. Karlsruhe: KIT Scientific Publishing. pp. 247-258.
    I argue against the claim that it is trivial to state that Sidgwick used the method of wide reflective equilibrium. This claim is based on what could be called the Triviality Charge, which is pressed against the method of wide reflective equilibrium by Peter Singer. According to this charge, there is no alternative to using the method if it is interpreted as involving all relevant philosophical background arguments. The main argument against the Triviality Charge is that although the method of (...)
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  6. Utopische Wirklichkeit. Ein Versuch über das Verhältnis der „Utopie“ zur „virtuellen Welt“.Michael W. Schmidt - 2012 - In Ulrich Gehmann (ed.), Virtuelle und ideale Welten. Kit Scientific Publishing. pp. 47-64.
    Mit einer virtuellen Welt kann sehr Verschiedenes und Mannigfaltiges assoziiert werden, unter anderem ein weiterer schillernder Begriff: Die Utopie. Sind nun virtuelle Welten allesamt Utopien? Oder müsste man vielmehr umgekehrt die Utopie als eine besondere virtuelle Welt hervorheben? Dass es überhaupt einen engen Zusammenhang zwischen den beiden Begriffen gibt, scheint nicht einmal selbstverständlich: Es gibt ihn sicherlich nicht, wenn man unter einer virtuellen Welt lediglich ein mit Hilfe von Computertechnik generiertes Szenario und unter einer Utopie schlicht und einfach eine der (...)
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  7. Utopie als Vermarktung. Nozicks missbräuchliche Verwendung des Begriffs Utopie für seine libertäre Staatstheorie.Michael W. Schmidt - 2010 - In Ulrich Arnswald & Hans-Peter Schütt (eds.), Thomas Morus' Utopia und das Genre der Utopie in der Politischen Philosophie. Kit Scientific Publishing. pp. 105-113.
    In Anarchie, Staat, Utopia aus dem Jahre 1974 legte Robert Nozick eine libertäre Staatstheorie dar, die er auch als Utopie verstanden wissen will. Ist nun diese Selbst-Etikettierung berechtigt? Hierzu möchte ich sowohl Nozicks Auffassung von einer Utopie betrachten, als auch nach einem sinnvollen Utopie-Begriff suchen, dem ein als utopisch bezeichneter Text zu genügen hat. Dabei werde ich hauptsächlich den Blick auf Thomas Morus’ genre-prototypischen Text über die Insel Utopia richten. Neben der Frage, ob Nozicks Staatstheorie als Utopie bezeichnet werden sollte, (...)
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  8. Book review: Coeckelbergh, Mark (2022): The political philosophy of AI. [REVIEW]Michael W. Schmidt - 2024 - TATuP - Zeitschrift Für Technikfolgenabschätzung in Theorie Und Praxis 33 (1):68–69.
    Mark Coeckelbergh starts his book with a very powerful picture based on a real incident: On the 9th of January 2020, Robert Williams was wrongfully arrested by Detroit police officers in front of his two young daughters, wife and neighbors. For 18 hours the police would not disclose the grounds for his arrest (American Civil Liberties Union 2020; Hill 2020). The decision to arrest him was primarily based on a facial detection algorithm which matched Mr. Williams’ driving license photo with (...)
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