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  1.  31
    Contributions of Memory Circuits to Language: The Declarative/Procedural Model.Michael T. Ullman - 2004 - Cognition 92 (1-2):231-270.
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  2.  41
    The Past-Tense Debate The Past and Future of the Past Tense.Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by a (...)
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  3.  13
    The Relation Between Receptive Grammar and Procedural, Declarative, and Working Memory in Specific Language Impairment.Gina Conti-Ramsden, Michael T. Ullman & Jarrad A. G. Lum - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  4.  18
    Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies.Scott A. Miles, Robbin A. Miranda & Michael T. Ullman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  5.  2
    Declarative Memory Predicts Phonological Processing Abilities in Adulthood.Dana T. Arthur, Michael T. Ullman & F. Sayako Earle - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Individual differences in phonological processing abilities have often been attributed to perceptual factors, rather than to factors relating to learning and memory. Here, we consider the contribution of individual differences in declarative and procedural memory to phonological processing performance in adulthood. We examined the phonological processing, declarative memory, and procedural memory abilities of 79 native English-speaking young adults with typical language and reading abilities. Declarative memory was assessed with a recognition memory task of real and made-up objects. Procedural memory was (...)
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  6.  23
    Beyond One Model Per Phenomenon.Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):108-109.
  7. The Biocognition of the Mental Lexicon.Michael T. Ullman - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
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  8. The Past and Future of the Past Tense Debate.Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by a (...)
     
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  9.  6
    Learning and Consolidation of Declarative Memory in Good and Poor Readers of English as a Second Language.Kuppuraj Sengottuvel, Arpitha Vasudevamurthy, Michael T. Ullman & F. Sayako Earle - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  10.  18
    What is Special About Broca's Area?Michael T. Ullman & Roumyana Izvorski - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):52-54.
    We discuss problematic theoretical and empirical issues and consider alternative explanations for Grodzinsky's hypotheses regarding receptive and expressive syntactic mechanisms in agrammatic aphasia. We also explore his claims pertaining to domain-specificity and neuroanatomical localization.
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