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  1.  34
    Social Change and the Adoption and Adaptation of Knowledge Claims: Whose Truth Do You Trust in Regard to Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined through the lens (...)
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  2. Democratizing Knowledge: Sustainable and Conventional Agricultural Field Days as Divergent Democratic Forms.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (4):508-528.
    This article highlights that in our rush to call for the democratization of science and expertise we must not forget to speak to what type of democratization we are calling for. In short, not all participatory forms are the same. In developing this argument, I examine one such form that has yet to receive much attention from science and technology studies scholars: the agricultural field day. In examining the field day, we find that its orientation—that is, toward either the conventional (...)
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  3.  15
    In Truth We Trust: Discourse, Phenomenology, and the Social Relations of Knowledge in an Environmental Dispute.Michael S. Carolan & Michael M. Bell - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (2):225-245.
    In this age of debate it is not news that what constitutes 'truth' is often at issue in environmental debates. But what is often missed is an insight that the speakers of Middle English understood a millennium ago: that truth comes from trust, which, is the central theoretical position of this paper. Our point is that truth depends essentially on social relations – relations that involve power and knowledge, to be sure, but also identity. Thus, challenges to what constitutes the (...)
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  4.  11
    The Mutability of Biotechnology Patents: From Unwieldy Products of Nature to Independent 'Object/S'.Michael S. Carolan - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (1):110-129.
    This article details how patent law works to create discrete, immutable biological ‘objects’. This socio-legal maneuver is necessary to distinguish these artifacts from the unwieldy realm of the natural world. The creation of ‘objects’ also serves the interests of capital, where a stable, unchanging, immutable object goes hand in hand with commodification. Yet this stabilization is incomplete. Pointing to a variety of different examples, this article illustrates how biotech patents do not speak to specific, immutable things. Biotech patents, rather, are (...)
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  5.  9
    Disciplining Nature: The Homogenising and Constraining Forces of Anti-Markets on the Food System.Michael S. Carolan - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (3):363 - 387.
    To understand the changing patterns within agriculture, it is important to look not only at social relations and organisational configurations. Also salient to such an analysis is an examination of how those formations give shape to non-humans. Much attention has been placed recently on the political economy of agriculture when speaking of these emergent patterns. Yet in doing this, the natural environment is all too often relegated to the backdrop; where the agroeconomy is viewed as something that manoeuvres within the (...)
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  6.  34
    The Multidimensionality of Environmental Problems: The GMO Controversy and the Limits of Scientific Materialism.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):67 - 82.
    This paper argues for a broader understanding of complexity; an understanding that speaks to the multidimensionality of environmental problems. As argued, environmental problems rest upon ontological, epistemological, and moral claims; they rest, in other words, upon statements about what is, knowledge, and what ought to be, respectively. To develop and illustrate this argument, the GMO (genetically modified organism) controversy is broken down according to these three dimensions. Dissecting environmental problems in this manner reveals why we cannot look solely toward the (...)
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  7. The Food Sharing Revolution: How Start-Ups, Pop-Ups, and Co-Ops Are Changing the Way We Eat.Michael S. Carolan - 2018 - Island Press/Center for Resource Economics.
    Marvin is a contract hog farmer in Iowa. He owns his land, his barn, his tractor, and his animal crates. He has seen profits drop steadily for the last twenty years and feels trapped. Josh is a dairy farmer on a cooperative in Massachusetts. He doesn’t own his cows, his land, his seed, or even all of his equipment. Josh has a healthy income and feels like he’s made it. In The Food Sharing Revolution, Michael Carolan tells the stories of (...)
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  8.  19
    Genetically Modified Diplomacy: The Global Politics of Agricultural Biotechnology and the Environment. [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (2):221-222.
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  9.  10
    Process Sub-Politics: Placing Empirical Flesh on Whiteheadian Thought.Michael S. Carolan - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):187 – 203.
    This paper is more explorative than programmatic. It attempts to place empirical flesh on some of Alfred North Whitehead's speculative thoughts on concrete apprehensions. The challenge lies in the fact that Whitehead was vague on the subject. While Whitehead offers numerous thoughts on why we mistake the abstract for the concrete he wrote considerably less on how we can get ourselves to think more concretely. I therefore examine an empirical case and work 'backwards', showing its affinities with process thought. A (...)
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  10.  8
    Ontological Politics: Mapping a Complex Environmental Problem.Michael S. Carolan - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (4):497-522.
    What is an environmental problem? Philosophers of science and sociologists of knowledge have been writing for more than a decade about the de-centred, multiple object. Yet what if this insight were applied to the realm of environmental problems? What would be revealed? These questions are explored in this paper by examining the ontology of environmental problems. Ethnomethodologists, social constructionists, and sociologists of knowledge have all painted a descriptive picture of a thoroughly sociological ontology; an ontology that is fluid, at times (...)
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  11.  18
    Risk, Trust and 'The Beyond' of the Environment: A Brief Look at the Recent Case of Mad Cow Disease in the United States.Michael S. Carolan - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (2):233-252.
    The epistemologically distant nature of many of today's environmental risks greatly problematises conventional risk analyses that emphasise objectivity, materiality, factual specificity and certainty. Such analyses fail to problematise issues of ontology and epistemology, assuming a reality that is readily 'readable' and a corresponding knowledge of that reality that is asocial, objective and certain. Under the weight of modern, invisible, manufactured environmental risks, however, these assumptions begin to crack, revealing their tenuous nature. As this paper argues, statements of risk are ultimately (...)
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