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  1.  6
    “To Normalize is to Impose a Requirement on an Existence.” Why Health Professionals Should Think Twice Before Using the Term “Normal” With Patients.Michael Rost - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (3):389-394.
    The term “normal” is culturally ubiquitous and conceptually vague. Interestingly, it appears to be a descriptive-normative-hybrid which, unnoticedly, bridges the gap between the descriptive and the normative. People’s beliefs about normality are descriptive and prescriptive and depend on both an average and an ideal. Besides, the term has generally garnered popularity in medicine. However, if medicine heavily relies on the normal, then it should point out how it relates to the concept of health or to statistics, and what, after all, (...)
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  2.  29
    Parents’ and Physicians’ Perceptions of Children’s Participation in Decision-Making in Paediatric Oncology: A Quantitative Study.Michael Rost, Tenzin Wangmo, Felix Niggli, Karin Hartmann, Heinz Hengartner, Marc Ansari, Pierluigi Brazzola, Johannes Rischewski, Maja Beck-Popovic, Thomas Kühne & Bernice S. Elger - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):555-565.
    The goal is to present how shared decision-making in paediatric oncology occurs from the viewpoints of parents and physicians. Eight Swiss Pediatric Oncology Group centres participated in this prospective study. The sample comprised a parent and physician of the minor patient. Surveys were statistically analysed by comparing physicians’ and parents’ perspectives and by evaluating factors associated with children’s actual involvement. Perspectives of ninety-one parents and twenty physicians were obtained for 151 children. Results indicate that for six aspects of information provision (...)
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  3.  3
    “Boiling Up the Problem of Violence” in Childbirth?—An Ethical Viewpoint on Medical Professional Responses to Women’s Reports of Mistreatment in Childbirth.Michael Rost, Louisa Arnold & Eva De Clercq - 2020 - Ethik in der Medizin 32 (2):189-193.
    In den letzten Jahren berichteten mehr und mehr Frauen von Gewalt und Respektlosigkeit in der Geburtshilfe. Inzwischen hat sich auch die Forschung verstärkt dieses Themas angenommen. Prävalenzschätzungen sind jedoch aufgrund erheblicher methodischer Schwächen noch nicht hinreichend genau zu beziffern. Die Vielzahl und Vielfalt der bestehenden Forschungsergebnisse lassen dennoch den Schluss zu, dass es in der Geburtshilfe in fast allen Regionen der Erde regelmäßig zu Gewalt und Respektlosigkeit und damit zu Menschenrechtsverletzungen kommt. Die Folgen reichen bis hin zu Posttraumatischen Belastungsstörungen, was (...)
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  4.  3
    In the Name of the Family? Against Parents’ Refusal to Disclose Prognostic Information to Children.Michael Rost & Emilian Mihailov - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (3):421-432.
    Parents frequently attempt to shield their children from distressing prognostic information. Pediatric oncology providers sometimes follow parental request for non-disclosure of prognostic information to children, invoking what we call the stability of the family argument. They believe that if they inform the child about terminal prognosis despite parental wishes, cohesion and family structure will be severely hampered. In this paper, we argue against parental request for non-disclosure. Firstly, we present the stability of the family argument in more detail. We, then, (...)
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  5.  6
    Trust Trumps Comprehension, Visceral Factors Trump All: A Psychological Cascade Constraining Informed Consent to Clinical Trials: A Qualitative Study with Stable Patients.Michael Rost, Rebecca Nast, Bernice S. Elger & David Shaw - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (1):87-102.
    This paper addresses psychological factors that might interfere with informed consent on the part of stable patients as potential early-phase clinical trial participants. Thirty-six semistructured interviews with patients who had either diabetes or gout were conducted. We investigated stable patients’ attitudes towards participating in a fictitious first-in-human trial of a novel intervention. We focused on an in-depth analysis of those statements and explanations that indicated the existence of psychological factors impairing decision-making capacity. Three main themes emerged: insufficient comprehension of the (...)
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