Results for 'Michael Plato'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens.Michael A. Rinella - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon. Accessible yet erudite, Pharmakon is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the place of intoxicants in ancient thought yet written.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  6
    Plato's Socratic Conversations: Drama and Dialectic in Three Dialogues.Michael C. Stokes - 1986 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
  3. Protagoras.Plato & Michael Frede - 1991 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Lombardo and Bell have translated this important early dialogue on virtue, wisdom, and the nature of Sophistic teaching into an idiom remarkable for its liveliness and subtlety. Michael Frede has provided a substantial introduction that illuminates the dialogue's perennial interest, its Athenian political background, and the particular difficulties and ironic nuances of its argument.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. Plato and the Invention of Life.Michael Naas - 2018 - Fordham University Press.
    Beginning with a reading of Plato's Statesman, this work interrogates the relationship between life and being in Plato's thought. It argues that in his later dialogues Plato discovers--or invents--a form of true or real life that transcends all merely biological life and everything that is commonly called life.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Plato's Theory of Forms and Other Papers.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2020 - Madison, WI, USA: College Papers Plus.
    Easy to understand philosophy papers in all areas. Table of contents: Three Short Philosophy Papers on Human Freedom The Paradox of Religions Institutions Different Perspectives on Religious Belief: O’Reilly v. Dawkins. v. James v. Clifford Schopenhauer on Suicide Schopenhauer’s Fractal Conception of Reality Theodore Roszak’s Views on Bicameral Consciousness Philosophy Exam Questions and Answers Locke, Aristotle and Kant on Virtue Logic Lecture for Erika Kant’s Ethics Van Cleve on Epistemic Circularity Plato’s Theory of Forms Can we trust our senses? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  10
    Harmonising Plato and Aristotle. I. Hadot Athenian and Alexandrian neoPlatonism and the Harmonization of Aristotle and Plato. Translated by Michael Chase. Pp. X + 188. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015. Cased, €103, Us$133. Isbn: 978-90-04-28007-6. [REVIEW]Michael F. Wagner - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (2):391-392.
  7.  39
    Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Political Thought.Michael S. Kochin - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Gender and Rhetoric in Plato's Thought explores the relation between Plato's Republic and Laws on the set of issues that the Laws itself marks out as fundamental to the comparison: the unity of the virtues, the role of women, and the place of the family. Plato aims to persuade men to abandon the view of the good life that Greek cities and their laws inculcate as the only life worth living for those who would be real men (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  14
    Protagoras.Plato & Michael Frede - 1956 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Lombardo and Bell have translated this important early dialogue on virtue, wisdom, and the nature of Sophistic teaching into an idiom remarkable for its liveliness and subtlety.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Plato, Socrates, and the Dialogues.Michael Sugrue - 1996 - Teaching Co..
    pt. 2: The domain of the Dialogues ; What Socratic dialogue is not ; The examined life ; Tragedy in the philosophic age of the Greeks ; Republic I, Justice, power, knowledge ; Republic II-V, Soul and city ; Republic VI-X, The architecture of reality ; Laws, The legacy of Cephalus -- pt. 2: Protagoras, The dialectic of the many and the one ; Gorgias, The temptation to speak ; Parmenides, Most true ; Sophist & statesman, The formal disintegration of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  38
    Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Michael Svoboda - 2009 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):pp. 191-196.
  11.  23
    Lysis.Michael Plato & Bordt - 1998 - [Mount Vernon, N.Y.]Printed for the Members of the Limited Editions Club at the Press of A. Colish.
  12.  4
    Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens.Michael A. Rinella - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon. Accessible yet erudite, Pharmakon is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the place of intoxicants in ancient thought yet written.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. Plato's Arguments and the Dialogue Form.Michael Frede - 1992 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:201-219.
  14. Plato's Sophist on False Statements'.Michael Frede - 1992 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge University Press. pp. 397--424.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  15.  30
    Plato's Stepping Stones: Degrees of Moral Virtue.Michael Cormack - 2006 - Continuum.
    Examines the dialogues from Plato's early and middle periods and illustrates the similarities and differences between Plators"s concept of craft knowledge and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16. Plato's Division of the Soul.Michael Woods - 1988 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 73: 1987. pp. 23-47.
  17.  66
    Causes in Plato’s Phaedo.Michael Wiitala - 2022 - Plato Journal 23:37-50.
    As Socrates recounts his search for causes (aitiai) in the Phaedo, he identifies the following as genuine causes: intelligence (nous), seeming best, choice of the best, and the forms. I argue that these causes should be understood as norms prescribing the conditions their effects must meet if those effects are to be produced. Thus, my account both explains what Socrates’ causes are and the way in which they cause what they cause.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Philosophic Anthology From Plato to Nietzsche.Michael Rethis - 1971 - Dubuque, Iowa, Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co..
  19.  1
    Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus: Volume 2, Book 2: Proclus on the Causes of the Cosmos and its Creation.David T. Runia & Michael Share (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume of Proclus' commentary on Plato's Timaeus records Proclus' exegesis of Timaeus 27a–31b, in which Plato first discusses preliminary matters that precede his account of the creation of the universe, and then moves to the account of the creation of the universe as a totality. For Proclus this text is a grand opportunity to reflect on the nature of causation as it relates to the physical reality of our cosmos. The commentary deals with many subjects that have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  18
    Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter.Michael Naas - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Plato and Greek Religion.Michael L. Morgan - 1992 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge University Press. pp. 227--47.
  22. Plato's Eschatological Myths.Michael Inwood - 2008 - In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press.
  23. Plato's Division of the Soul.Michael Woods - 1988 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 73: 1987. pp. 23-48.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  45
    Plato and the Sightlovers of the Republic.Michael C. Stokes - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):103-132.
  25. Plato and Nietzsche on Death: An Introduction to Plato’s Phaedo.Michael Davis - 1980 - Ancient Philosophy 1 (1):69-80.
  26. Being and Becoming in Plato.Michael Frede - 1988 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:37-52.
  27.  23
    Plato: A Guide for the Perplexed. [REVIEW]Michael Wiitala - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):630-634.
    Review of Gerald A. Press, Plato: A Guide for the Perplexed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  2
    Plato's Third Eye: Studies in Marsilio Ficino's Metaphysics and its Sources.Michael J. B. Allen - 1995 - Variorum.
    Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499) was one of the luminaries of the Florentine Renaissance and the scholar responsible for the revival of Platonism. The translator and interpreter of the works of both Plato and Plotinus as well as of various Hermetic and Neoplatonic texts, Ficino was also a musician, priest, magus and psychotherapist, an original philosopher and the author of a vast and important correspondence with the intellectual figures of his day including Lorenzo the Magnificent. Professor Allen has become the foremost (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  1
    Michael Psellos’ ‘Arrangement’ of Hermias’ Commentary on Plato’s Phaedrus.Georges Arabatzis - 2010 - Peitho 1 (1):111-120.
    The Byzantine philosopher Michael Psellos wrote a brief treatise entitled An Explanation of the Drive of the Soul Chariot and the Army of Gods According to Plato in the Phaedrus. The treatise consists of a compilation of excerpts from Hermias’ commentary on the Phae­drus. Psellos does not mention Hermias’ name but rather traces the origins of the treatise back to some “Greek theologians”. Psellos’ text presents a great interpretative challenge: the order of the myths about the charioteer and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Michael J. B. Allen, "Nuptial Arithmetic: Marsilio Ficino's Commentary on the Fatal Number in Book VIII of Plato's Republic". [REVIEW]Charles Trinkaus - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (4):684.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  10
    Plato in the Theatre: The Gorgias in Dialogue with Euripides' Antiope Platon Im Theater: Der Gorgias Im Dialog MIT Euripides' Antiope.Michael Schramm - 2020 - Hermes 148 (3):286.
    This paper examines the influence of Euripides on Plato, reflecting the intertextuality between Euripides' Antiope und Plato's Gorgias. It is argued that the final part of the Gorgias is a serious philosophical answer to the tragic aporias, which Euripides dramatically staged in his Antiope and which the viewer should answer for himself according to the conception of Euripidean tragedy.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  30
    Plato’s Religious Voice: Socrates as Godsent, in Plato and the Platonists1.Michael Erler - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 313.
    An obvious feature of Plato’s writings that distinguishes them from the works of later Platonists is his use of the dialogue form. Even more specifically and strikingly, the character of Socrates—whose voice is sometimes so hard to disentangle from that of Plato himself—occupies centre stage in almost all of Plato’s writings, while he is conspicuous by his absence from those of later Platonists. Yet the voice of Socrates can still be heard in the writings of later Platonists, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  6
    The Cosmological Argument From Plato to Leibniz.Michael Durrant - 1981 - Religious Studies 17 (2):289-291.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  34.  29
    Did Plato Nod? Some Conjectures on Egoism and Friendship in the Lysis.Michael D. Roth - 1995 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 77 (1):1-20.
  35.  31
    Plato's Arguments for Forms. [REVIEW]Michael Woods - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (1):199-200.
  36.  5
    Plato and the Invention of Life, Written by Michael Naas. [REVIEW]Hilde Vinje - 2019 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 13 (2):197-199.
  37.  19
    Postmodern Platos: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer, Strauss, Derrida.Michael Dink - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):183-186.
    Zuckert has written an intriguing book, whether taken in its exoteric form, as indicated by the title and introduction, as a detached and balanced account of the response to Plato of five “postmodern” thinkers, or in its esoteric form, as indicated by the assignment of the three central chapters to Strauss, as an exposition and defense of Strauss’s account of the truth about the human good. Even if her accounts of the other four are, for many readers, the honey (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Observations on Perception in Plato's Later Dialogues.Michael Frede - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
  39.  7
    ‘‘Plato Socraticus’ – The Apology of Socrates and Euthyphro.Michael Erler - 2011 - Peitho 2 (1):79-92.
    The present paper focuses on the two works of Plato’s first tetralogyso as to bring out and generally characterize the Socratic dimensionof Plato’s philosophizing. It is common knowledge that Socrates’ trialand defense inspired Plato to engage in dialogical writing which culminatedin the famous logoi Sokratikoi. The article deals with the followingissues: 1. Philosophy as a ‘care for the soul’ in the Apology; 2. “The unexaminedlife is not worth living for a human being” ; 3. Philosophyas a service (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  18
    Plato's Cratylus: Argument, Form, and Structure.Michael W. Riley (ed.) - 2005 - Rodopi.
    This book explains how the Cratylus, Plato’s apparently meandering and comical dialogue on the correctness of names, makes serious philosophical progress by its notorious etymological digressions. While still a wild ride through a Heraclitean flood of etymologies which threatens to swamp language altogether, the Cratylus emerges as an astonishingly organized evaluation of the power of words.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  4
    Plato’s Critique of Writings/Orality and Theory of Principles.Michael Erler - 2015 - Peitho 6 (1):45-58.
    The present paper is the first Polish translation of the following excerpts from the Author’s original and innovative book entitled Platon : IV 4. a) Kritik der Schriftlichkeit; b) Hören des Richtiges, Verfehlen der Wahrheit: Platons Kritik der Mündlichkeit; IX 1. Schriftlicher Dialog und mündliches Prinziepiendenken; 2. Einheit und Vielheit: Ein Rekonstruktionsversuch; 3. Mündliche Lehre als Ergänzung des schriftlichen Dialogs. The book represents a new paradigm in research on Plato and the topics developed in it constitute a concise and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  3
    Plato's Statesman: The Web of Politics. [REVIEW]Michael Dink - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):686-686.
    Rosen's web is woven out of a warp of laborious textual commentary and a woof of excursuses, which develop three main issues. Two of these concern the Eleatic Stranger's differences from Socrates--on the character of the method of division and on the end of politics. The third concerns the distinction and relationship between technê and phronêsis in politics. Rosen's penchant for scattering the excursuses through the commentary with apparent randomness and his lack of clarity about which of the three--Stranger, (...), or Rosen--is being assigned responsibility for any particular claim make it difficult to piece together a coherent account of what he wants to say on these three issues. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  5
    Plato, Levinas, and Transcendence.Michael L. Morgan - 2019 - Levinas Studies 13:85-102.
    Although Levinas frequently references Plato positively, they are engaged in different philosophical enterprises. Whereas Levinas takes his place in the tradition of modern moral philosophy for which the atrocities of the twentieth century are undeniable burdens, Plato is concerned with cultivating dispositions that promote psychological and social harmony. For Levinas, Plato’s Form of the Good signals a dual commitment, on the one hand to the primacy of ethical action to existence, and on the other to the connection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  36
    Plato's Quinean Beard: Did Plato Ever Grow It?Michael Durrant - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (1):113-121.
    Quine may be taken to use the phrase ‘Plato's Beard’ to denote a solution to the following problem: How is it possible to speak of that which does not exist, of non-being or as Read has it, to denote a solution to the problem: ‘How can a sentence with empty names have meaning?’. Quine writes: Nonbeing must in some sense be, otherwise what is that there is not? This tangled doctrine might be nicknamed Plato's beard; historically it has (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  32
    Plato the Pious Michael L. Morgan: Platonic Piety: Philosophy and Ritual in Fourth-Century Athens. Pp. X + 273. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1990. £25. [REVIEW]Harold Tarrant - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (01):72-74.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  23
    Plato's World: Man's Place in the Cosmos.Michael Dink - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):920-922.
    Taking as his "hermeneutic object" the two trilogies of dialogues linked by the Euthyphro, supplemented by his own choice of the Protagoras as an appropriate introduction, Cropsey weaves an interpretative web, whose woof is moderate, relatively straightforward paraphrase, and whose warp is occasional bold imposition of his own preoccupations on slight textual occasions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Plato and Protagoras.Michael Gagarin - 1968 - Dissertation, Yale University
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  35
    Plato, the 'Third Man' and the Nature of the Forms.Michael Durrant - 1979 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):287-304.
  49.  23
    Plato’s Erotic World: From Cosmic Origins to Human Death Gordon Jill Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012; X + 243 Pp.; $95.00. [REVIEW]Michael Strawser - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (2):375-377.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  41
    The Forms in the Euthyphro and the Statesman: A Case Against the Developmental Reading of Plato’s Dialogues.Michael Oliver Wiitala - 2014 - International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):393-410.
    The Euthyphro is generally considered one of Plato’s early dialogues. According to the developmental approach to reading the dialogues, when writing the Euthyphro Plato had not yet developed the sort of elaborate “theory of forms ” that we see presented in the middle dialogues and further refined in the late dialogues. This essay calls the developmental account into question by showing how key elements from the theory of forms that appear in the late dialogues, particularly in the Statesman, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000