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  1.  35
    Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World.Michael O'Donovan-Anderson - 1997 - Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states—knowledge and belief in particular—and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy—Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans—and from mainstream continental work—Heidegger and his commentators and critics—and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those who (...)
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  2.  14
    The Incorporated Self: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Embodiment.Michael O'Donovan-Anderson - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Incorporated Self demonstrates that although embodiment has long been a central concern of the theoretical humanities, its potential to alter epistemology and open up new areas of dualistic inquiry has not been pursued far enough. This anthology collects the the works of scholars from a broad range of disciplines, each examining the nature of the body and the necessity of embodiment to the human experience -- for our self awareness, our sense of identity, and the workings of the mind.
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  3.  38
    Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought.Michael O'Donovan-Anderson - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):941-943.
    Philosophy in the Flesh is a small, important book wrapped inside a large self-important one. It begins by announcing three major “findings” of cognitive science: “The mind is inherently embodied. Thought is mostly unconscious.concepts are largely metaphorical,” which between them bring to an end “more than two millennia of a priori philosophical speculation”. To help mitigate this mortal blow to Western thought, Lakoff and Johnson helpfully propose, from empirical foundations, to build philosophy anew. The findings they detail are of extreme (...)
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  4.  97
    Wittgenstein and Rousseau on the Context of Justification.Michael O'Donovan-Anderson - 1996 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (3):75-92.
    The historical aim of this paper is to reveal some striking similarities in Wittgenstein's treatment of epistemic justification and Rousseau's treatment of political justification. The theoretical aim is to open up the possibility of an understanding of justification which requires neither the discovery of some fundamental ground for judgment nor the alienation of the judge from the community or practice to be justified. Against the prevailing tradition in which justification occurs by reflectively rooting the practice in question in some unquestioned (...)
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