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  1.  13
    The Implicit Rules of Combat.Gorge A. Romero, Michael N. Pham & Aaron T. Goetz - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):496-516.
  2.  19
    Men’s Interest in Allying with a Previous Combatant for Future Group Combat.Nicole Barbaro, Justin K. Mogilski, Todd K. Shackelford & Michael N. Pham - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):328-336.
    Intra- and intergroup conflict are likely to have been recurrent features of human evolutionary history; however, little research has investigated the factors that affect men’s combat alliance decisions. The current study investigated whether features of previous one-on-one combat with an opponent affect men’s interest in allying with that opponent for future group combat. Fifty-eight undergraduate men recruited from a psychology department subject pool participated in a one-on-one laboratory fight simulation. We manipulated fight outcome, perceived fighter health asymmetry, and the presence (...)
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  3.  16
    Integrating Body Movement Into Attractiveness Research.Bernhard Fink, Bettina Weege, Nick Neave, Michael N. Pham & Todd K. Shackelford - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  4.  24
    The Relationship Between Objective Sperm Competition Risk and Men’s Copulatory Interest Is Moderated by Partner’s Time Spent with Other Men.Michael N. Pham & Todd K. Shackelford - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):476-485.
    Men who spend a greater proportion of time apart from their female partner since the couple’s last copulation are at greater “objective” sperm competition risk. We propose a novel cue to sperm competition risk: the time she spends with her male friends. Four hundred and twenty men in a committed, heterosexual, sexual relationship completed a questionnaire. The results indicate that men at greater objective sperm competition risk report less time desired until the couple’s next copulation, greater interest in copulating with (...)
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