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  1.  27
    Wittgenstein: Meaning and Judgement.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this important study, Michael Luntley offers a compelling reading of Wittgenstein’s account of meaning and intentionality, based upon a unifying theme in the early and later philosophies. A compelling reading of Wittgenstein’s account of meaning and intentionality. Offers an important and original reading of Wittgenstein’s key texts. Based upon a unifying theme in Wittgenstein’s early and later philosophies.
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  2.  28
    Anti-Realism and Logic.Michael Luntley - 1989 - Philosophical Quarterly 39 (156):361.
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  3.  98
    Contemporary Philosophy of Thought: Truth, World, Content.Michael Luntley - 1999 - Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This text gives voice to the idea that the study of the philosophy of thought and language is more than a specialism, but rather lies at the very heart of the ...
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  4. On the logic of aiming at truth.Seyed Ali Kalantari & Michael Luntley - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):419-422.
    We argue that the debate about the normativity of belief thesis has been hampered by the slogan, ‘belief aims at truth’. We show that the slogan provides no content to the normativity of belief. The slogan encourages formulations of the norm as a prescriptive norm. There are well-known problems with such formulations. We provide a new formulation of the thesis as a prohibitive norm. This captures the key intuition most normativists about belief want to endorse.
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  5.  48
    Training and learning.Michael Luntley - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):695-711.
    Some philosophers of education think that there is a pedagogically informative concept of training that can be gleaned from Wittgenstein's later writings: training as initiation into a form of life. Stickney, in 'Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A response to Michael Luntley'takes me to task for ignoring this concept. In this essay I argue that there is no such concept to be ignored. I start by noting recent developments in Wittgenstein scholarship that raise serious issues about (...)
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  6. Wittgenstein: Meaning and Judgement.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this important study, Michael Luntley offers a compelling reading of Wittgenstein’s account of meaning and intentionality, based upon a unifying theme in the early and later philosophies. A compelling reading of Wittgenstein’s account of meaning and intentionality. Offers an important and original reading of Wittgenstein’s key texts. Based upon a unifying theme in Wittgenstein’s early and later philosophies.
     
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  7.  8
    Training and Learning.Michael Luntley - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):695-711.
    Some philosophers of education think that there is a pedagogically informative concept of training that can be gleaned from Wittgenstein's later writings: training as initiation into a form of life. Stickney, in ‘Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A response to Michael Luntley’takes me to task for ignoring this concept. In this essay I argue that there is no such concept to be ignored. I start by noting recent developments in Wittgenstein scholarship that raise serious issues about (...)
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  8.  75
    Understanding expertise.Michael Luntley - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):356-370.
    It is sometimes said that experts know and decide 'in the moment', not by theoretical or propositionally articulated reflection. What differentiates expert from novice is not that the former know a lot more than the latter, but that their knowledge and the way they use it is qualitatively different. Although this idea is common in the education literature, especially the literature on professional education, it has received little sustained philosophical treatment. I shall argue that the idea of a distinct expert (...)
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  9.  23
    Non‐conceptual Content and the Sound of Music.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (4):402-426.
    I present an argument for the existence of nonconceptual representational content. The argument is compatible with McDowell's defence of conceptualism against those arguments for nonconceptual content that draw upon claims about the fine‐grainedness of experience. I present a case for nonconceptual content that concentrates on the idea that experience can possess representational content that cannot perform the function of conceptual content, namely figure in the subject's reasons for belief and action. This sort of argument for nonconceptual content is best achieved (...)
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  10. Nonconceptual content and the sound of music.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (4):402-426.
    : I present an argument for the existence of nonconceptual representational content. The argument is compatible with McDowell's defence of conceptualism against those arguments for nonconceptual content that draw upon claims about the fine‐grainedness of experience. I present a case for nonconceptual content that concentrates on the idea that experience can possess representational content that cannot perform the function of conceptual content, namely figure in the subject's reasons for belief and action. This sort of argument for nonconceptual content is best (...)
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  11.  63
    Conceptual development and the paradox of learning.Michael Luntley - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):1-14.
    Conceptual development requires learning. It requires learning to make discriminations that were previously unavailable to the subject. Notwithstanding the descriptions of learning available in the psychological and educational literature, there is no account available that shows that it is so much as possible. There can be no such account unless there is an answer to Jerry Fodor's paradox of learning. On our current understanding of concept acquisition, there is no such thing as learning. In this paper I explore a way (...)
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  12.  15
    Conceptual Development and the Paradox of Learning.Michael Luntley - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):1-14.
    Conceptual development requires learning. It requires learning to make discriminations that were previously unavailable to the subject. Notwithstanding the descriptions of learning available in the psychological and educational literature, there is no account available that shows that it is so much as possible. There can be no such account unless there is an answer to Jerry Fodor’s paradox of learning. On our current understanding of concept acquisition, there is no such thing as learning. In this paper I explore a way (...)
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  13.  53
    What do nurses know?Michael Luntley - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):22-33.
    This paper defends an epistemic conservatism - propositional knowing-that suffices for capturing all the fine details of the knowledge of experienced nurses that depends on the complex ways in which they are embedded in shared fields of activity. I argue against the proliferation of different ways of knowing associated with the work of Dreyfus and Benner. I show how propositional knowledge can capture the detail of the phenomenology that motivates the Dreyfus/Benner proliferation.
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  14.  10
    Thought and Reference.Michael Luntley - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):266-270.
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  15.  4
    Wittgenstein: Opening Investigations.Michael Luntley - 2015 - Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley.
    In this provocatively compelling new book, Michael Luntley offers a revolutionary reading of the opening section of Wittgenstein’s _Philosophical Investigations _ Critically engages with the most recent exegetical literature on Wittgenstein and other state-of-the-art philosophical work Encourages the re-incorporation of Wittgenstein studies into the mainstream philosophical conversation Has profound consequences for how we go on to read the rest of Wittgenstein’s major work Makes a significant contribution not only to the literature on Wittgenstein, but also to studies in philosophy of (...)
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  16.  73
    Expectations without content.Michael Luntley - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (2):217-236.
    In this paper I show how the way experience presents things to us can be treated without attributing a representational content to experience. The basic claim that experience can present us with more things than the range of things available to us in thought is neutral with respect to the choice between a content account of experience and a naïve content-free account. I show how Meyer's theory of expectations in accounting for our experience of music supports the naïve account. Expectations (...)
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  17.  27
    Forgetski Vygotsky: Or, a plea for bootstrapping accounts of learning.Michael Luntley - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (10):957-970.
    This paper argues that sociocultural accounts of learning fail to answer the key question about learning—how is it possible? Accordingly, we should adopt an individualist bootstrapping methodology in providing a theory of learning. Such a methodology takes seriously the idea that learning is staged and distinguishes between a non-comprehending engagement with things and a comprehending engagement. It suggests that, in the light of recent work in psychology with insights from Wittgenstein, there is rich scope for a bootstrapping account of learning. (...)
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  18.  29
    Learning, empowerment and judgement.Michael Luntley - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):418–431.
    Here is a distinction that appears very simple, looks compelling and seems to be deeply rooted in our reflections on learning. 1 The distinction is between activities of learning that involve training and those that involve reasoning. In the former, the pupil is a passive recipient of habits of mind and action. The mechanism by which they acquire these habits is mimesis, not reasoning. In contrast, learning by reasoning involves considerable mental activity by the pupil who has to work out (...)
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  19.  52
    On Education and Initiation.Michael Luntley - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):41-56.
    In this paper I take up Peters' invitation to think of education in terms of initiation. I argue that the concept of initiation demands much closer scrutiny and analysis in order to provide a substantive thesis about education. A key challenge concerns how we conceive of the initiate. The very idea of initiation suggests that, in some interesting sense, the pupil qua initiate joins in learning activities; their role is more than that of passive recipient of values and belief. But (...)
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  20.  26
    Ethics in the face of uncertainty: Judgement not rules.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (4):325–333.
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  21.  16
    Ethics in the face of uncertainty: judgement not rules.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (4):325-333.
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  22.  11
    Growing Awareness.Michael Luntley - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):1-20.
    I propose a theory of conceptual development in which concept possession consists in seeing the world aright. The capacity to see things aright is primitive; it is not explained in terms of grasp of a theory or in terms of assimilation of socially determined norms of word use. The educational task in promoting conceptual development is to train the forms of awareness by which the learner comes to see the world correctly. I sketch the consequences of this approach for understanding (...)
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  23.  46
    Patterns, Particularism and Seeing the Similarity.Michael Luntley - 2002 - Philosophical Papers 31 (3):271-291.
    Abstract I argue for a form of particularism from a reading of Wittgenstein's critique of the idea that word use is governed by rules. In place of the idea that word use is driven by rules, I show how the patterns of word use, in virtue of which we express our reasons, emerge from our ongoing practice, including our practice of seeing things as similar. I argue that the notion of seeing the similarities is primitive for Wittgenstein. The remark, ?this (...)
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  24.  28
    Language, Logic and Experience.Bernhard Weiss & Michael Luntley - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):534.
  25.  6
    Moral Sentiments, and the Difference They Make.Annette C. Baier & Michael Luntley - 1995 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 69 (1):15-46.
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  26. Dynamic thoughts and empty minds.Michael Luntley - 1997 - European Review of Philosophy 2:77-103.
  27.  14
    Growing awareness.Michael Luntley - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):1–20.
    I propose a theory of conceptual development in which concept possession consists in seeing the world aright. The capacity to see things aright is primitive; it is not explained in terms of grasp of a theory or in terms of assimilation of socially determined norms of word use. The educational task in promoting conceptual development is to train the forms of awareness by which the learner comes to see the world correctly. I sketch the consequences of this approach for understanding (...)
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  28.  2
    Reason, Truth and Self: The Postmodern Reconditioned.Michael Luntley - 1995 - New York: Routledge.
    Michael Luntley provides a lively introduction to the debate over postmodernism. Sympathisers of the postmodernist critique of absolute knowledge have jetisoned concepts of reason,t ruth and self; this abandonment has fuelled their opponents' case against postmodernism. This has led them to ignore the very real problems raised by the postmodernists. Luntley offers a clear and careful exposition of how rational debate survives despite the Enlightenment's failings. _Reason, Truth and Self_ covers many of the key questions of our age: * How (...)
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  29.  2
    Reason, Truth and Self: The Postmodern Reconditioned.Michael Luntley - 1995 - New York: Routledge.
    Michael Luntley provides a lively introduction to the debate over postmodernism. Sympathisers of the postmodernist critique of absolute knowledge have jetisoned concepts of reason,t ruth and self; this abandonment has fuelled their opponents' case against postmodernism. This has led them to ignore the very real problems raised by the postmodernists. Luntley offers a clear and careful exposition of how rational debate survives despite the Enlightenment's failings. _Reason, Truth and Self_ covers many of the key questions of our age: * How (...)
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  30. Contemporary Philosophy of Thought: Truth, World, Content.Michael Luntley - 2000 - Mind 109 (436):969-973.
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  31.  38
    What's doing? Activity, naming and Wittgenstein's response to Augustine.Michael Luntley - 2010 - In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical investigations: a critical guide. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  32.  45
    Moral Sentiments, and the Difference They Make.Annette C. Baier & Michael Luntley - 1995 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 69 (1):15 - 45.
  33.  18
    On the teaching and learning of words.Michael Luntley - 2008 - In David K. Levy & Edoardo Zamuner (eds.), Wittgenstein’s Enduring Arguments. Routledge.
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  34.  12
    Learning, Empowerment and Judgement.Michael Luntley - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):418-431.
    Here is a distinction that appears very simple, looks compelling and seems to be deeply rooted in our reflections on learning. The distinction is between activities of learning that involve training and those that involve reasoning. In the former, the pupil is a passive recipient of habits of mind and action. The mechanism by which they acquire these habits is mimesis, not reasoning. In contrast, learning by reasoning involves considerable mental activity by the pupil who has to work out what (...)
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  35.  1
    Language, Logic & Experience: The Case for Anti-realism.Michael Luntley - 1988 - Bloomsbury Academic.
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  36.  34
    Reason, truth, and self: the postmodern reconditioned.Michael Luntley - 1995 - New York: Routledge.
    Postmodernism has had a significant and divisive impact on late-Twentieth Century thought. Proponents of the postmodernist critique of absolute knowledge have felt it necessary to jettison the Enlightenment concepts of truth, reason and the self. Opponents of postmodernism have seized on this abandonment of rational standards only to ignore the very real problems raised by the postmodernists. Michael Luntley provides a lively introduction to debate and offers a clear and careful exposition of how rational debate can survive even if the (...)
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  37.  18
    Play's the Thing: Wherein We Find How Learning Can Begin.Michael Luntley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (1):36-53.
    In this paper I outline an answer to the following question: What are the abilities that make you the sort of subject who can learn, who can acquire new concepts, new skills? There are many traits that matter in providing an answer. But I want to suggest that the ability for creative and imaginative engagement with and sustenance of the playful patterns of our aesthetic experience is core. I identify a core sense of play that fills this role. Play's the (...)
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  38.  21
    What’s the Problem with Dewey?Michael Luntley - 2016 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 8 (1).
    In Democracy and Education Dewey has a rich conception of educational flourishing that stands at odds with the instrumentalism about learning endemic to much contemporary educational policy. And his vision posits deep dependencies between the different domains in which education is transformative: the transformation of the individual learner into an inquirer equipped to adapt in a changing environment and the transformations in the social world required for the provision of opportunities for such experiences to all. In this paper, I trace (...)
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  39.  24
    The character of learning.Michael Luntley - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):689–704.
    In this paper I propose a contrast between learning as the acquisition of theories and learning as the development of insight. I then suggest that, in a great many cases, the cognitive achievement by which we come to organise behaviour rationally is the development of insight, where this is independent of the acquisition of knowledge regimented in theories. The distinction is between a model in which a subject rationalises behaviour by appeal to knowledge of particulars rather than general theoretical knowledge. (...)
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  40.  8
    The Character of Learning.Michael Luntley - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):689-704.
    In this paper I propose a contrast between learning as the acquisition of theories and learning as the development of insight. I then suggest that, in a great many cases, the cognitive achievement by which we come to organise behaviour rationally is the development of insight, where this is independent of the acquisition of knowledge regimented in theories. The distinction is between a model in which a subject rationalises behaviour by appeal to knowledge of particulars rather than general theoretical knowledge. (...)
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  41.  13
    An engaging practice?Michael Luntley - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):357 – 373.
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  42. Ethics in the Face of Uncertainty: judgement not rules.Michael Luntley - 2004 - Philosophy for Business 7.
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  43.  55
    Training, Training, Training.Michael Luntley - 2012 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 4 (2):88-104.
    Both Wittgenstein and Dewey have a role for the concept of skills and techniques in their understanding of practices and thereby the possession of concepts. Skills are typically acquired through training. It can seem, however, that their respective appeals to practice are dissimilar: Dewey’s appeal is, like Peirce’s, programmatic. It is meant to do philosophical work. In contrast, for Wittgenstein, the appeal to practice can seem a primitive, something that is meant to put an end to philosophical work. I argue (...)
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  44.  34
    Aberrations of a sledgehammer: Reply to Devitt.Michael Luntley - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 62 (3):315 - 323.
  45.  35
    Attention, time & purpose.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Philosophical Explorations 6 (1):2 – 17.
    Action explanations that cite dynamic beliefs and desires cannot be modelled as causal explanations. The contents of dynamic psychological states cannot be treated as the causal antecendents to behaviour. Behavioural patterns cannot be explained in virtue of the patterns of operations performed upon the intentional antecedents to behaviour. Dynamic intentional states are persisting regulatory devices for behaviour that provide couplings with the environment. Behavioural patterns emerge from choice couplings rather than being produced by patterns for operating upon intentional antecendents to (...)
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  46. Appendix What Happens to the Private Language Argument?Michael Luntley - 2015 - In Wittgenstein. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 159–169.
     
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  47. Cynthia Macdonald and Graham Macdonald, eds., Philosophy of Psychology: Debates on Psychological Explanation Reviewed by.Michael Luntley - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (5):340-343.
  48.  2
    Explanations.Michael Luntley - 2015 - In Wittgenstein. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 125–158.
    This chapter explores the status of Wittgenstein's methodological remarks about the role of explanation. In §109 Wittgenstein provides one of his most extensive reflections on methodology. In many cases, scientific explanation works by hypothesizing entities whose behavior explains the behavior of familiar things. In hypothesizing entities whose behavior explains the behavior of familiar entities, the scientific explanation is metaphysically promiscuous. The metaphysical promiscuity of explanations that try to ape the scientific variety is signaled in the idea of the “super” order. (...)
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  49.  12
    Expertise - initiation into learning, not knowing.Michael Luntley - unknown
  50.  2
    Index.Michael Luntley - 2015 - In Wittgenstein. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 176–179.
    In this chapter, the author provides a detailed commentary on the first two sections of Philosophical Investigations. The first section gives a banal description that the author is tempted to regiment with a philosophical theory of the essence of language, the philosophical conception. But that philosophical conception is not at play in the simple example of a primitive language. In second section, Wittgenstein is providing a simpler example than Augustine's to see if the philosophical conception applies. He provides a primitive (...)
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