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  1. The Limited Relevance of Neuroimaging in Insanity Evaluations. [REVIEW]Michael J. Vitacco, Emily Gottfried, Scott O. Lilienfeld & Ashley Batastini - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):249-260.
    Forensic evaluations of insanity have recently borne witness to an influx of neuroimaging methods, especially structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, to assist in the development of explanations that help to excuse legal responsibility for criminal behavior. The results of these scanning methods have been increasingly introduced in legal settings to offer or support a clinical diagnosis that in turn suggests that an individual was incapable of knowing right from wrong, or to pinpoint brain dysfunction suggestive (...)
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    The Limited Relevance of Neuroimaging in Insanity Evaluations. [REVIEW]Michael J. Vitacco, Emily Gottfried, Scott O. Lilienfeld & Ashley Batastini - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):249-260.
    Forensic evaluations of insanity have recently borne witness to an influx of neuroimaging methods, especially structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, to assist in the development of explanations that help to excuse legal responsibility for criminal behavior. The results of these scanning methods have been increasingly introduced in legal settings to offer or support a clinical diagnosis that in turn suggests that an individual was incapable of knowing right from wrong, or to pinpoint brain dysfunction suggestive (...)
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    The Limited Relevance of Neuroimaging in Insanity Evaluations. [REVIEW]Michael J. Vitacco, Emily Gottfried, Scott O. Lilienfeld & Ashley Batastini - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):249-260.
    Forensic evaluations of insanity have recently borne witness to an influx of neuroimaging methods, especially structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, to assist in the development of explanations that help to excuse legal responsibility for criminal behavior. The results of these scanning methods have been increasingly introduced in legal settings to offer or support a clinical diagnosis that in turn suggests that an individual was incapable of knowing right from wrong, or to pinpoint brain dysfunction suggestive (...)
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    Comment: Holding Psychopaths Morally and Criminally Culpable.Michael J. Vitacco, Steven K. Erickson & David A. Lishner - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):423-425.
    Theoretical arguments that psychopathy eliminates individual responsibility for illegal behavior and can therefore serve as a basis for an insanity defense are largely premised on emotional characteristics of psychopathy that impede the individual’s capacity to appreciate right from wrong. We offer arguments and countervailing evidence indicating psychopaths do have the capacity to appreciate right from wrong and therefore should not be absolved of criminal responsibility.
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  5. Limitations Using Neuroimaging to Reconstruct Mental State After a Crime.Michael J. Vitacco, Alynda M. Randolph, Rebecca J. Nelson Aguiar & Megan L. Porter Staats - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (4):694-701.
    Neuroimaging offers great potential to clinicians and researchers for a host of mental and physical conditions. The use of imaging has been trumpeted for forensic psychiatric and psychological evaluations to allow greater insight into the relationship between the brain and behavior. The results of imaging certainly can be used to inform clinical diagnoses; however, there continue to be limitations in using neuroimaging for insanity cases due to limited scientific backing for how neuroimaging can inform retrospective evaluations of mental state. In (...)
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