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  1.  54
    The Vulnerable and the Susceptible.Michael H. Kottow - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):460-471.
    Human beings are essentially vulnerable in the view that their existence qua humans is not given but construed. This vulnerability receives basic protection from the State, expressed in the form of the universal rights all citizens are meant to enjoy. In addition, many individuals fall prey to destitution and deprivation, requiring social action aimed at recognising the specific harms they suffer and providing remedial assistance to palliate or remove their plights.Citizens receive protection against their biologic vulnerability by means of an (...)
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  2.  73
    Vulnerability: What kind of principle is it?Michael H. Kottow - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):281-287.
    The so-called European principles of bioethicsare a welcome enrichment of principlistbioethics. Nevertheless, vulnerability, dignityand integrity can perhaps be moreaccurately understood as anthropologicaldescriptions of the human condition. Theymay inspire a normative language, but they donot contain it primarily lest a naturalisticfallacy be committed. These anthropologicalfeatures strongly suggest the need todevelop deontic arguments in support of theprotection such essential attributes ofhumanity require. Protection is to beuniversalized, since all human beings sharevulnerability, integrity and dignity, thusfundamenting a mandate requiring justice andrespect for fundamental human (...)
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  3.  67
    The disease-subject as a subject of literature.Andrea R. Kottow & Michael H. Kottow - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:10.
    Based on the distinction between living body and lived body, we describe the disease-subject as representing the impact of disease on the existential life-project of the subject. Traditionally, an individual's subjectivity experiences disorders of the body and describes ensuing pain, discomfort and unpleasantness. The idea of a disease-subject goes further, representing the lived body suffering existential disruption and the possible limitations that disease most probably will impose. In this limit situation, the disease-subject will have to elaborate a new life-story, a (...)
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  4.  34
    Between caring and curing.Michael H. Kottow - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):53-61.
    Summary Care and cure have been described as different kinds of ethical approaches to clinical situations. Female concerns in nursing care have been contrasted with masculine, cure orientated physician's attitudes. Ethics in such different voices may have sociologic determinants, but they do not represent intrinsic distinctions. Medicine has shown a divergent development, on the one hand stressing cure in a deterministic and instrumental way, on the other hand being aware that disease is as much a pathographic as a biographic, care‐requiring (...)
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  5.  8
    The rationale of value-laden medicine.Michael H. Kottow - 2002 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):77-84.
  6.  40
    Should research ethics triumph over clinical ethics?Michael H. Kottow - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):695-698.
  7.  45
    Theoretical aids in teaching medical ethics.Michael H. Kottow - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):225-229.
    Medical ethics could be better understood if some basic theoretical aspects of practices in health care are analysed. By discussing the underlying ethical principles that govern medical practice, the student should also become familiar with the notion that medical ethics is much more than the external application of socially accepted moral standards. Professions in general and medicine in particular have internal values that command their moral virtuosity at the same time as their technical excellence. Three examples where clinical practice can (...)
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  8.  10
    Genomanalyse und Gentherapie.Michael H. Kottow - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):107-107.
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  9.  26
    In-vitro Fertilisation -- ein Umstrittenes Experiment.Michael H. Kottow - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):107-107.
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  10.  59
    Introductory notes.Michael H. Kottow - 1988 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (3):247-250.
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  11.  92
    Levels of objectivity in the analysis of medicoethical decision making: A reply.Michael H. Kottow - 1980 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):230-233.
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  12.  21
    Letter to the Editor: A Commentary on M. K. Wynia's “Consequentialism and Harsh Interrogations”.Michael H. Kottow - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W36-W36.
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  13.  15
    Medizinische Ethik.Michael H. Kottow - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):98-99.
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  14.  12
    Why Huntington's Disease Isn't Unique.Michael H. Kottow - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (4):33-33.
  15.  20
    Whither bioethics? A reply to commentaries on 'The rationale of value‐laden medicine' (Kottow 2002; Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8, 77–84). [REVIEW]Michael H. Kottow - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):71-73.