Results for 'Michael H. Eisher'

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  1.  36
    Book Reviews and Notices. [REVIEW]Robert Menzies, Julius Lipner, Pradip Bhattacharya, Christian K. Wedemeyer, Carl Olson, Kate Brittlebarik, Karen Pechilis Prentiss, David Carpenter, Anne E. Monius, Robin Rinehart, Patricia M. Greer, John Grimes, Srimati Basu, Lorilai Biernacki, Reid B. Locklin, Srimati Basu, Michael H. Eisher, Doris R. Jakobsh, Steve Derné, Gail M. Harley, Gavin Flood, Frederick M. Smith & Ariel Glucklich - 2002 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (1):75-110.
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  2.  14
    Practical Reflection.Michael H. Robins - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):949-952.
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  3.  44
    Vulnerability: What Kind of Principle is It?Michael H. Kottow - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):281-287.
    The so-called European principles of bioethicsare a welcome enrichment of principlistbioethics. Nevertheless, vulnerability, dignityand integrity can perhaps be moreaccurately understood as anthropologicaldescriptions of the human condition. Theymay inspire a normative language, but they donot contain it primarily lest a naturalisticfallacy be committed. These anthropologicalfeatures strongly suggest the need todevelop deontic arguments in support of theprotection such essential attributes ofhumanity require. Protection is to beuniversalized, since all human beings sharevulnerability, integrity and dignity, thusfundamenting a mandate requiring justice andrespect for fundamental human (...)
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  4.  29
    Michael H. Robins, 1941-2002.Michael Bradie, David Copp & Christopher Morris - 2003 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (5):167 - 168.
    This is an obituary for Michael H. Robins.
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  5.  6
    Comparison of Two Theories of "Ratio" and "Difference" Judgments.Michael H. Birnbaum - 1980 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 109 (3):304-319.
  6.  29
    A Cognitive Account of Belief: A Tentative Road Map.Michael H. Connors & Peter W. Halligan - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  7.  6
    Preservice Teachers’ Perception of Plagiarism: A Case from a College of Education.Michael H. Romanowski - 2022 - Journal of Academic Ethics 20 (3):289-309.
    Few studies examine plagiarism in a Middle Eastern context, specifically from the perspectives of preservice teachers. As future gatekeepers of academic integrity, preservice teachers need to understand plagiarism. This study surveyed 128 female preservice teachers in one university in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. The survey explores preservice teachers regarding their understandings and reasons for academic plagiarism and their responses to particular scenarios. Findings indicate that preservice teachers have a thorough comprehension of plagiarism and suggest a lack of knowledge of (...)
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  8.  11
    New Paradoxes of Risky Decision Making.Michael H. Birnbaum - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (2):463-501.
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  9.  32
    Delusions and Theories of Belief.Michael H. Connors & Peter W. Halligan - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102935.
  10.  33
    The Ethical Context of Entrepreneurship: Proposing and Testing a Developmental Framework. [REVIEW]Michael H. Morris, Minet Schindehutte, John Walton & Jeffrey Allen - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 40 (4):331 - 361.
    The aim of this study is to increase our understanding of the ethical climate of entrepreneurial firms as they grow and develop. A developmental framework is introduced to describe the formal and informal ethical structures that emerge in entrepreneurial firms over time. Factors influencing where firms are within the developmental framework are posited, including the entrepreneur's psychological profile, lifecycle stage of the business, and descriptive characteristics of the venture. It is also proposed that the implementation of ethical structures will impact (...)
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  11.  98
    General Cognitive Principles for Learning Structure in Time and Space.Michael H. Goldstein, Heidi R. Waterfall, Arnon Lotem, Joseph Y. Halpern, Jennifer A. Schwade, Luca Onnis & Shimon Edelman - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):249-258.
  12.  8
    Using Sound to Solve Syntactic Problems: The Role of Phonology in Grammatical Category Assignments.Michael H. Kelly - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):349-364.
  13.  6
    All in Good Time: Long-Lasting Postdictive Effects Reveal Discrete Perception.Michael H. Herzog, Leila Drissi-Daoudi & Adrien Doerig - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (10):826-837.
  14.  47
    The Vulnerable and the Susceptible.Michael H. Kottow - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):460-471.
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  15.  39
    Hypnosis and Belief: A Review of Hypnotic Delusions. [REVIEW]Michael H. Connors - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:27-43.
  16.  22
    Paradoxes of Democratic Accountability: Polarized Parties, Hard Decisions, and No Despot to Veto.Michael H. Murakami - 2008 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 20 (1-2):91-113.
    Parties are back, and many are cheering. Party polarization has voters seeing stark differences between Democrats and Republicans and demonstrating more ideological constraint than previous generations. But these signs of a more “responsible” electorate are an illusion, because the public is no more knowledgeable than ever about the type of “information” it needs if it is to exercise effective control over the public‐policy outcomes it cares the most about. Indeed, polarization has produced a political environment where both voters and policy (...)
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  17.  51
    Reflective Argumentation: A Cognitive Function of Arguing.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (4):365-397.
    Why do we formulate arguments? Usually, things such as persuading opponents, finding consensus, and justifying knowledge are listed as functions of arguments. But arguments can also be used to stimulate reflection on one’s own reasoning. Since this cognitive function of arguments should be important to improve the quality of people’s arguments and reasoning, for learning processes, for coping with “wicked problems,” and for the resolution of conflicts, it deserves to be studied in its own right. This contribution develops first steps (...)
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  18.  22
    E. P. Bos and H. A. Krop, Eds., "Franco Burgersdijk : Neo-Aristotelianism in Leiden". [REVIEW]Michael H. Shank - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):519.
  19.  44
    Promising, Intending and Moral Autonomy.Michael H. Robins - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction Promising seems to be an act of intentionally creating an obligation where none existed before, but how is such a thing accomplished? ...
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  20.  16
    John Dewey’s Theory of Art, Experience and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling.Michael H. Mitias - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (4):526-528.
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  21.  5
    A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions to the End of the Fifth Century B. C.Michael H. Jameson, Russell Meiggs & David Lewis - 1972 - American Journal of Philology 93 (3):474.
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  22.  10
    Ethical Considerations in Microbial Therapeutic Clinical Trials.Michael H. Woodworth, Kaitlin L. Sitchenko, Cynthia Carpentieri, Rachel J. Friedman-Moraco, Tiffany Wang & Colleen S. Kraft - 2017 - The New Bioethics 23 (3):210-218.
    As understanding of the human microbiome improves, novel therapeutic targets to improve human health with microbial therapeutics will continue to expand. We outline key considerations of balancing risks and benefits, optimising access, returning key results to research participants, and potential conflicts of interest.
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  23.  41
    A Laboratory Analogue of Mirrored-Self Misidentification Delusion: The Role of Hypnosis, Suggestion, and Demand Characteristics.Michael H. Connors, Amanda J. Barnier, Robyn Langdon, Rochelle E. Cox, Vince Polito & Max Coltheart - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1510-1522.
    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's own reflection in the mirror is a stranger. In two experiments, we tested the ability of hypnotic suggestion to model this condition. In Experiment 1, we compared two suggestions based on either the delusion's surface features (seeing a stranger in the mirror) or underlying processes (impaired face processing). Fifty-two high hypnotisable participants received one of these suggestions either with hypnosis or without in a wake control. In Experiment 2, we examined the extent (...)
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  24.  49
    Developing a Knowledge Strategy.Michael H. Zack - 2006 - In Laurence Prusak & Eric Matson (eds.), Knowledge Management and Organizational Learning: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Today, knowledge is considered the most strategically important resource and learning the most strategically important capability for business organizations. However, many initiatives being undertaken to develop and exploit organizational knowledge are not explicitly linked to or framed by the organization’s business strategy. In fact, most knowledge management initiatives are viewed primarily as information systems projects. While many managers intuitively believe that strategic advantage can come from knowing more than competitors, they are unable to explicitly articulate the link between knowledge and (...)
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  25.  70
    Philosophy of and as Interdisciplinarity.Michael H. G. Hoffmann, Jan C. Schmidt & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2013 - Synthese 190 (11):1857-1864.
  26.  17
    The More Things Change…: Metamorphoses and Conceptual Structure.Michael H. Kelly & Frank C. Keil - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (4):403-416.
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  27.  39
    Modeling Ethical Attitudes and Behaviors Under Conditions of Environmental Turbulence: The Case of South Africa. [REVIEW]Michael H. Morris, Amy S. Marks, Jeffrey A. Allen & Newman S. Peery - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (10):1119 - 1130.
    This study explores the impact of environmental turbulence on relationships between personal and organizational characteristics, personal values, ethical perceptions, and behavioral intentions. A causal model is tested using data obtained from a national sample of marketing research professionals in South Africa. The findings suggest turbulent conditions lead professionals to report stronger values and ethical norms, but less ethical behavioral intentions. Implications are drawn for organizations confronting growing turbulence in their external environments. A number of suggestions are made for ongoing research.
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  28.  70
    How to Get It. Diagrammatic Reasoning as a Tool of Knowledge Development and its Pragmatic Dimension.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2004 - Foundations of Science 9 (3):285-305.
    Discussions concerning belief revision, theorydevelopment, and ``creativity'' in philosophy andAI, reveal a growing interest in Peirce'sconcept of abduction. Peirce introducedabduction in an attempt to providetheoretical dignity and clarification to thedifficult problem of knowledge generation. Hewrote that ``An Abduction is Originary inrespect to being the only kind of argumentwhich starts a new idea'' (Peirce, CP 2.26).These discussions, however, led to considerabledebates about the precise way in which Peirce'sabduction can be used to explain knowledgegeneration (cf. Magnani, 1999; Hoffmann, 1999).The crucial question is (...)
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  29.  23
    Sources of Mass Political Disagreement: Rejoinder to Marietta.Michael H. Murakami - 2010 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 22 (2-3):331-354.
    Do people tend to disagree over political issues because of conflicting values? Or do they disagree about which policies will most effectively promote shared values? In a previous article, I argued that the issues most people think are most important tend to fall into the latter category. On the issues of greatest importance to the mass public, most citizens agree about the ends that are desirable, but disagree about which policy means would best effectuate those ends. Consequently, disputes about facts—disputes (...)
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  30.  11
    Expertise and the Representation of Space.Michael H. Connors & Guillermo Campitelli - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  31.  45
    Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot.Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the data have changed (...)
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  32. Promising, Intending and Moral Automony.Michael H. Robins & N. J. H. Dent - 1986 - Mind 95 (378):268-272.
     
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  33.  28
    The Nonadditivity of Personality Impressions.Michael H. Birnbaum - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):543.
  34.  60
    Testing Transitivity in Choice Under Risk.Michael H. Birnbaum & Ulrich Schmidt - 2010 - Theory and Decision 69 (4):599-614.
    Recently proposed models of risky choice imply systematic violations of transitivity of preference. This study explored whether people show the predicted intransitivity of the two models proposed to account for the certainty effect in Allais paradoxes. In order to distinguish “true” violations from those produced by “error,” a model was fit in which each choice can have a different error rate and each person can have a different pattern of preferences that need not be transitive. Error rate for a choice (...)
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  35.  13
    Morality Judgments: Tests of an Averaging Model.Michael H. Birnbaum - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):35.
  36. Unless You Believe, You Shall Not Understand: Logic, University, and Society in Late Medieval Vienna.Michael H. Shank - 1988 - Princeton Legacy Library.
    Founded in 1365, not long after the Great Plague ravaged Europe, the University of Vienna was revitalized in 1384 by prominent theologians displaced from Paris--among them Henry of Langenstein. Beginning with the 1384 revival, Michael Shank explores the history of the university and its ties with European intellectual life and the city of Vienna. In so doing he links the abstract discussions of university theologians with the burning of John Hus and Jerome of Prague at the Council of Constance (...)
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  37.  39
    Stimulating Reflection and Self-Correcting Reasoning Through Argument Mapping: Three Approaches.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2018 - Topoi 37 (1):185-199.
    A large body of research in cognitive science differentiates human reasoning into two types: fast, intuitive, and emotional “System 1” thinking, and slower, more reflective “System 2” reasoning. According to this research, human reasoning is by default fast and intuitive, but that means that it is prone to error and biases that cloud our judgments and decision making. To improve the quality of reasoning, critical thinking education should develop strategies to slow it down and to become more reflective. The goal (...)
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  38.  67
    Philosophy and Architecture.Michael H. Mitias (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    Contents: PART I: AESTHETICS OF ARCHITECTURE: QUESTIONS. Francis SPARSHOTT: The Aesthetics of Architecture and the Politics of Space. Arnold BERLEANT: Architecture and the Aesthetics of Continuity. Stephen DAVIES: Is Architecture Art? PART II: NATURE OF ARCHITECTURE. B.R. TILGHMAN: Architecture, Expression, and the Understanding of a Culture. David NOVITZ: Architectural Brilliance and the Constraints of Time. Michael H. MITIAS: Expression in Architecture. Ralf WEBER: The Myth of Meaningful Forms. Michael H. MITIAS: Is Meaning in Architecture a Myth? A Response (...)
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  39. Logical Argument Mapping: A Method for Overcoming Cognitive Problems of Conflict Management.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2005 - International Journal of Conflict Management 16:304-334.
    A crucial problem of conflict management is that whatever happens in negotiations will be interpreted and framed by stakeholders based on their different belief-value systems and world views. This problem will be discussed in the first part of this article as the main cognitive problem of conflict management. The second part develops a general semiotic solution of this problem, based on Charles Peirce's concept of "diagrammatic reasoning." The basic idea is that by representing one 's thought in diagrams, the conditions (...)
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  40.  7
    Introduction.Michael H. Hunt - 2017 - In A Social Ontology. Yale University Press. pp. 1-22.
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  41. Analyzing Framing Processes in Conflicts and Communication by Means of Logical Argument Mapping.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2011 - In . Peter Lang.
    The primary goal of this chapter is to present a new method—called Logical Argument Mapping —for the analysis of framing processes as they occur in any communication, but especially in conflicts. I start with a distinction between boundary setting, meaning construction, and sensemaking as three forms or aspects of framing, and argue that crucial for the resolution of frame-based controversies is our ability to deal with those “webs” of mutually supporting beliefs that determine sensemaking processes. Since any analysis of framing (...)
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  42.  8
    Consensus Building and Its Epistemic Conditions.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2021 - Topoi 40 (5):1173-1186.
    Most of the epistemological debate on disagreement tries to develop standards that describe which actions or beliefs would be rational under specific circumstances in a controversy. To build things on a firm foundation, much work starts from certain idealizations—for example the assumption that parties in a disagreement share all the evidence that is relevant and are equal with regard to their abilities and dispositions. This contribution, by contrast, focuses on a different question and takes a different route. The question is: (...)
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  43.  24
    Benedetto Croce Reconsidered: Truth and Error In Theories of Art. [REVIEW]Michael H. Mitias - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):270-271.
    Precision, lucidity, richness of insight, and critical, objective judgment are, I think, some of the essential features of good philosophical thought. This book exemplifies, to a good extent, these features. In it the author tries to achieve two main goals: first, to distinguish what still “lives” in Croce’s philosophy “from what may be advantageously discarded, that is, the idealistic implications that he drew from his tenet that historical knowledge is self-knowledge.” Here Moss argues that “Croce’s idealist epistemological assumptions along with (...)
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  44.  21
    Law, Fossils, and the Configuring of Hegel’s Philosophy of Nature.Michael H. Hoffheimer - 1995 - Idealistic Studies 25 (2):155-173.
    This paper will draw on Hegel’s writings in Jena from 1801 to 1804, especially the fragments for a philosophy of nature from 1803-04, to explore his sustained concern with the proper configuration of a system of nature. Hegel’s earliest treatment of nature sheds light on the role of nature in the system he published over a decade later. Moreover, the earliest system illuminates two problems posed by his later philosophy of nature-the relationship of nature and spirit, and the sequence and (...)
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  45.  19
    Research With Controlled Drugs: Why and Why Not? Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “An Ethical Exploration of Barriers to Research on Controlled Drugs”.Michael H. Andreae, Evelyn Rhodes, Tyler Bourgoise, George M. Carter, Robert S. White, Debbie Indyk, Henry Sacks & Rosamond Rhodes - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):1-3.
    We examine the ethical, social, and regulatory barriers that may hinder research on therapeutic potential of certain controversial controlled substances like marijuana, heroin, or ketamine. Hazards for individuals and society and potential adverse effects on communities may be good reasons for limiting access and justify careful monitoring of these substances. Overly strict regulations, fear of legal consequences, stigma associated with abuse and populations using illicit drugs, and lack of funding may, however, limit research on their considerable therapeutic potential. We review (...)
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  46.  26
    Whitehead, Process Philosophy, and Education.Michael H. Mitias - 1983 - Idealistic Studies 13 (3):267-268.
    This insightful and meticulous book is composed of two major parts. In the first part Brumbaugh argues that the classical concepts of space, time, and causality underlie contemporary understanding of the meaning and aims of education. But these concepts, like the Cartesian concept of “insular space,” are one-sided. Human beings are viewed as self-enclosed entities, as external to each other. Though rejected nowadays, this idea shapes educational thinking. We still consider the student as a kind of mental box which needs (...)
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  47.  24
    Art and the Absolute: A Study In Hegel’s Aesthetics.Michael H. Mitias - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):89-90.
    We are told by its author that Art and the Absolute is a study of Hegel’s Aesthetics, but it is not; it is mainly an attempt to elucidate certain principles and categories in Hegel’s aesthetic theory and show their relevance and importance—or more concretely, the relevance and importance of Hegel’s aesthetic insight—in analyzing some of the central questions and issues in contemporary philosophy of art.
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  48.  7
    Moral Foundations of the State In Hegel’s Philosophy of Right: Anatomy of an Argument.Michael H. Mitias (ed.) - 1984 - Rodopi.
    Anatomy of an Argument Michael H. Mitias. FOUR LOVE AS THE BASIS OF THE FAMILY Let us grant, for the sake of argument, my critic would object, that Hegel has made a distinction between a universal or natural law and a human law, ...
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  49.  46
    Rich Models.Michael H. Albert & Rami P. Grossberg - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (3):1292-1298.
    We define a rich model to be one which contains a proper elementary substructure isomorphic to itself. Existence, nonstructure, and categoricity theorems for rich models are proved. A theory T which has fewer than $\min(2^\lambda,\beth_2)$ rich models of cardinality $\lambda(\lambda > |T|)$ is totally transcendental. We show that a countable theory with a unique rich model in some uncountable cardinal is categorical in ℵ 1 and also has a unique countable rich model. We also consider a stronger notion of richness, (...)
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  50. Kant and Consequentialism in Context: The Second Critique’s Response to Pistorius.Michael H. Walschots - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (2):313-340.
    Commentators disagree about the extent to which Kant’s ethics is compatible with consequentialism. A question that has not yet been asked is whether Kant had a view of his own regarding the fundamental difference between his ethical theory and a broadly consequentialist one. In this paper I argue that Kant does have such a view. I illustrate this by discussing his response to a well-known objection to his moral theory, namely that Kant offers an implicitly consequentialist theory of moral appraisal. (...)
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