4 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Michael Golluber [5]Michael Scott Golluber [1]
See also
Michael Golluber
Saint John's College
  1.  84
    Aristotle on Knowledge and the Sense of Touch.Michael Golluber - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:655-680.
    This paper on Aristotle’s De Amilla attempts to understand the treatise as a unified whole---a unity, it may be argued, that is only as problematic as is the unity of the soul of which it speaks. Aristotle’s treatise on the soul must strike its reader as being all too perplexing, and the subject of touch in particular seems to arouse such perplexity. But Aristotle would have it that “in our inquiry into the soul, in going forward, we must be thoroughly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  46
    Wedin, Michael V. Aristotle’s Theory of Substance: The Categories and Metaphysics Zeta. [REVIEW]Michael Golluber - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):167-169.
  3.  4
    Aristotle’s Theory of Substance: The Categories and Metaphysics Zeta. [REVIEW]Michael Golluber - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):167-168.
    Significant scholarship has been devoted to the problem of the incompatibility of Aristotle’s accounts of substance in the Categories and in the Metaphysics. Substance, in the former treatise, is that category of being distinguished from the other accidental categories by reason of the ontological dependence of accident upon substance: every accident must be present in a substance to be present at all. Primary substances such as “Socrates” are distinguished from secondary substances such as “human being” or “animal” since secondary substances (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  5
    Aristotle on How One Becomes What One Is.Michael Golluber - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):363 - 382.
    THE DE ANIMA POSES CERTAIN CHALLENGES to those readers who would like to see Aristotle self-bound to the principles of logographic necessity proposed by his teacher Plato. When held as a standard, Socrates’ call in the Phaedrus for a logos organized like a living being with a body of its own, whose organized parts are to be composed in fitting relation to each other and to the whole, is a call that seems to reveal an Aristotle who lacks a certain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark