Results for 'Michael Dale Robinson'

971 found
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  1.  10
    Question of the Month.Rose Dale, Ian Robinson, Paul P. Mealing, Colin Brookes & Michael Brake - 2018 - Philosophy Now 125:48-51.
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  2.  20
    Using history to teach invention and design: The case of the telephone.Michael E. Gorman & J. Kirby Robinson - 1998 - Science & Education 7 (2):173-201.
  3.  14
    The significance of enhanced visual responses in posterior parietal cortex.Michael E. Goldberg & David Lee Robinson - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):503-505.
  4. The seven deadly sins of research on affect.L. Clore Gerald, Michael Justin Storbeck & David Centerbar D. Robinson - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
     
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  5.  31
    The movement of eye and hand as a window into language and cognition.Michael Spivey, Daniel Richardson & Rick Dale - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford handbook of human action. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 225--249.
  6.  27
    Counting to ten milliseconds: Low-anger, but not high-anger, individuals pause following negative evaluations.Michael D. Robinson, Benjamin M. Wilkowski, Brian P. Meier, Sara K. Moeller & Adam K. Fetterman - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):261-281.
    The emotion of anger, when chronic, is especially problematic. Frequent and intense experiences of anger predict quite a few adverse health outcomes and are especially implicated in cardiovascular...
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  7.  24
    Collective obituary for James D. Marshall (1937–2021).Michael Peters, Colin Lankshear, Lynda Stone, Paul Smeyers, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Roger Dale, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Nesta Devine, Robert Shaw, Bruce Haynes, Denis Philips, Kevin Harris, Marc Depaepe, David Aspin, Richard Smith, Hugh Lauder, Mark Olssen, Nicholas C. Burbules, Peter Roberts, Susan L. Robertson, Ruth Irwin, Susanne Brighouse & Tina Besley - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (4):331-349.
    Michael A. PetersBeijing Normal UniversityMy deepest condolences to Pepe, Dom and Marcus and to Jim’s grandchildren. Tina and I spent a lot of time at the Marshall family home, often attending dinn...
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  8. Social Robots and Society.Sven Nyholm, Cindy Friedman, Michael T. Dale, Anna Puzio, Dina Babushkina, Guido Lohr, Bart Kamphorst, Arthur Gwagwa & Wijnand IJsselsteijn - 2023 - In Ibo van de Poel (ed.), Ethics of Socially Disruptive Technologies: An Introduction. Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers. pp. 53-82.
    Advancements in artificial intelligence and (social) robotics raise pertinent questions as to how these technologies may help shape the society of the future. The main aim of the chapter is to consider the social and conceptual disruptions that might be associated with social robots, and humanoid social robots in particular. This chapter starts by comparing the concepts of robots and artificial intelligence and briefly explores the origins of these expressions. It then explains the definition of a social robot, as well (...)
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  9.  37
    Will work for food: agricultural interns, apprentices, volunteers, and the agrarian question.Michael Ekers, Charles Z. Levkoe, Samuel Walker & Bryan Dale - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):705-720.
    Recently, growing numbers of interns, apprentices, and volunteers are being recruited to work seasonally on ecologically oriented and organic farms across the global north. To date, there has been very little research examining these emergent forms of non-waged work. In this paper, we analyze the relationships between non-waged agricultural work and the economic circumstances of small- to medium-size farms and the non-economic ambitions of farm operators. We do so through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of farmers’ responses to two surveys (...)
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  10.  20
    The Neural Basis of Our Responses to Reading Novels: On Being Moved, the Motion in Emotion.Michael Trimble, Dale Hesdorffer & Robert Letellier - 2024 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 31 (1):204-226.
    Telling tales and reading have been a part of human activity for a very long time. We review in brief the anthropological evidence, then the emergence of the 'modern novel'. This explores in narratives the psychological reflections of the characters concerned with life circumstances including loss, abandonment, despair, illness, dying, and death. We report findings that the response of crying to a novel occurs as often as to music, not reported before: both 'move us'. We note what several critics and (...)
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  11. Brains, trains, and ethical claims: Reassessing the normative implications of moral dilemma research.Michael T. Dale & Bertram Gawronski - 2023 - Philosophical Psychology 36 (1):109-133.
    Joshua Greene has argued that the empirical findings of cognitive science have implications for ethics. In particular, he has argued (1) that people’s deontological judgments in response to trolley problems are strongly influenced by at least one morally irrelevant factor, personal force, and are therefore at least somewhat unreliable, and (2) that we ought to trust our consequentialist judgments more than our deontological judgments when making decisions about unfamiliar moral problems. While many cognitive scientists have rejected Greene’s dual-process theory of (...)
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  12. If I were the teacher… qualitative study of attitude toward science.Michael D. Piburn & Dale R. Baker - 1993 - Science Education 77 (4):393-406.
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  13. Sex differences in formal reasoning ability: Task and interviewer effects.Michael D. Piburn & Dale R. Baker - 1989 - Science Education 73 (1):101-113.
     
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  14.  56
    Measures of emotion: A review.Iris B. Mauss & Michael D. Robinson - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (2):209-237.
  15.  13
    Hegel, the End of History, and the Future.Eric Michael Dale - 2014 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In Phenomenology of Spirit Hegel is often held to have announced the end of history, where 'history' is to be understood as the long pursuit of ends towards which humanity had always been striving. In this, the first book in English to thoroughly critique this entrenched view, Eric Michael Dale argues that it is a misinterpretation. Dale offers a reading of his own, showing how it sits within the larger schema of Hegel's thought and makes room for (...)
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  16.  32
    Even feature integration is cognitively impenetrable.Dale J. Cohen & Michael Kubovy - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):371-372.
    Pylyshyn is willing to assume that attention can influence feature integration. We argue that he concedes too much. Feature integration occurs preattentively, except in the case of certain “perverse” displays, such as those used in feature-conjunction searches.
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  17.  12
    Esoteric Buddhist Painting.Michael Saso, Ishida Hisatoyo & E. Dale Saunders - 1990 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:302.
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  18.  14
    Strengthening Our Cities: Exploring the Intersection of Ethics, Diversity and Inclusion, and Social Innovation in Revitalizing Urban Environments.Michael L. Barnett, Brett Anitra Gilbert, Corinne Post & Jeffrey A. Robinson - 2024 - Journal of Business Ethics 189 (4):647-653.
    Currently more than half of the world’s population lives in cities. This is expected to rise to more than two-thirds by mid-century. Thus, our economic, social, and environmental challenges mostly and increasingly play out in urban settings. How can cities be strengthened to address the growing challenges they face? This special issue addresses the ethical implications of revitalizing urban environments, and the roles that diversity and inclusion, as well as social innovation, play in this process. The five papers herein show (...)
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  19.  40
    Communications: The Transnational Ruling Class Formation Thesis: A Symposium.Michael Mann, Giovanni Arrighi, Jason W. Moore, Robert Went, Kees Van Der Pijl, William I. Robinson, Guglielmo Carchedi, Fred Moseley & David Laibman - 2001 - Science and Society 65 (4):464-533.
  20. Neurons and normativity: A critique of Greene’s notion of unfamiliarity.Michael T. Dale - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology 33 (8):1072-1095.
    In his article “Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality,” Joshua Greene argues that the empirical findings of cognitive neuroscience have implications for ethics. Specifically, he contends that we ought to trust our manual, conscious reasoning system more than our automatic, emotional system when confronting unfamiliar problems; and because cognitive neuroscience has shown that consequentialist judgments are generated by the manual system and deontological judgments are generated by the automatic system, we ought to trust the former more than the latter when facing unfamiliar moral (...)
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  21. The evolution of moral belief: support for the debunker’s causal premise.Michael T. Dale - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-18.
    The causal premise of the evolutionary debunking argument contends that human moral beliefs are explained by the process of natural selection. While it is universally acknowledged that such a premise is fundamental to the debunker’s case, the vast majority of philosophers focus instead on the epistemic premise that natural selection does not track moral truth and the resulting skeptical conclusion. Recently, however, some have begun to concentrate on the causal premise. So far, the upshot of this small but growing literature (...)
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  22.  4
    Frankenstein and Philosophy: The Shocking Truth.Michael Hauskeller, Danilo Chaib, Greg Littmann, Dale Jacquette, Elena Casetta & Luca Tambolo - 2013 - Open Court.
    Ever since it was first unleashed in 1818 the story of Victor Frankenstein and his reanimated, stitched-together corpse has inspired intense debate. Can organic life be reanimated using electricity or genetic manipulation? If so, could Frankenstein’s monster really teach itself to read and speak as Mary Shelley imagined? Do monsters have rights, or responsibilities to those who would as soon kill them? What is it about music that so affects Frankenstein’s monster, or any of us? What does Mel Brook’s Frau (...)
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  23.  70
    A compatibilist-friendly rejection of prepunishment.Michael Robinson - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (3):589-594.
    In a series of recent papers, Saul Smilansky has argued that compatibilists have no principled way of resisting the view that prepunishment is at least sometimes appropriate, thus revealing compatibilism to be a radical position, out of keeping with our ordinary moral judgments. Recent attempts to resist this conclusion seem to have overlooked the biggest problem with Smilansky’s argument, which is this: Smilanksy argues that the most obvious objection to prepunishment—namely, that it is inappropriate because it involves punishing the innocent (...)
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  24. The sexual selection of hominin bipedalism.Michael Dale - 2018 - Ideas in Ecology and Evolution 11 (1):47-60.
    In this article, I advance a novel hypothesis on the evolution of hominin bipedalism. I begin by arguing extensively for how the transition to bipedalism must have been problematic for hominins during the Neogene. Due to this and the fact that no other primate has made the unusual switch to bipedalism, it seems likely that the selection pressure towards bipedalism was unusually strong. With this in mind, I briefly lay out some of the most promising hypotheses on the evolutionary origin (...)
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  25.  20
    Are self-deceivers enhancing positive affect or denying negative affect? Toward an understanding of implicit affective processes.Michael D. Robinson, Sara K. Moeller & Paul W. Goetz - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (1):152-180.
    Self-deception is an important construct in social, personality, and clinical literatures. Although historical and clinical views of self-deception have regarded it as defensive in nature and operation, modern views of this individual difference variable instead highlight its apparent benefits to subjective mental health. The present four studies reinforce the latter view by showing that self-deception predicts positive priming effects, but not negative priming effects, in reaction time tasks sensitive to individual differences in affective priming. In all studies, individuals higher in (...)
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  26.  16
    Avian Formation on a South-Facing Slope along the Northwest Rim of the Argyre Basin.Michael A. Dale, George J. Haas, James S. Miller, William R. Saunders, A. J. Cole, Joseph M. Friedlander & Susan Orosz - 2011 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 25 (3).
    This is a description of an avian-shaped feature that rests below a network of cellular structures found on a mound within the Argyre Basin of Mars in Mars Global Surveyor image M14-02185, acquired on April 30, 2000, and released to the public on April 4, 2001. The area examined is located near 48.0° South, 55.1° West. The formation is approximately 2,400 meters long from the tip of its beak to the tip of its farthest tail feather. There is a minimum (...)
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  27.  29
    A linguistic module for integrating the senses, or a house of cards?Rick Dale & Michael Spivey - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):681-682.
    Carruthers invokes a number of controversial assumptions to support his thesis. Most are questionable and unnecessary to investigate the wider relevance of language in cognition. A number of research programs (e.g., interactionist psycholinguistics and cognitive linguistics) have for years pursued a similar thesis and provide a more empirically grounded framework for investigating language’ cognitive functions.
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  28.  9
    BMP signalling in early Xenopus development.Leslie Dale & C. Michael Jones - 1999 - Bioessays 21 (9):751-760.
    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are typically members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family with diverse roles in embryonic development. At least five genes with homology to BMPs are expressed during Xenopus development, along with their receptors and intracellular signalling pathways. The evidence suggests that BMPs have roles to play in both mesoderm induction and dorsoventral patterning. Studies in Xenopus have also identified a number of inhibitory binding proteins for the classical BMPs, encoded by genes such as chordin and (...)
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  29.  30
    Hegel, Jesus. And Judaism.Eric Michael Dale - 2006 - Animus 11:4-12.
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  30.  30
    Intentional explanations and radical theories of education.Michael Dale - 1990 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (3):179-194.
    In this paper I argue that Marxist studies of schools have overlooked the power of intentional explanations to explain schooling practices and policies. This oversight is at least in part due to many radical analyses failing to distinguish between explaining the acquisition and persistence of beliefs and determining the social consequences that follow from acting on beliefs. I further contend that radical researchers examining schooling practices must develop a more rigorous and refined conception of capitalist class interests.
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  31.  43
    Pumping for gestural origins: The well may be rather dry.Rick Dale, Daniel C. Richardson & Michael J. Owren - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):218-219.
    Corballis's explanation for right-handedness in humans relies heavily on the gestural protolanguage hypothesis, which he argues for by a series of “intuition pumps.” Scrutinizing the mirror system hypothesis and modern gesture as components of the argument, we find that they do not provide the desired evidence of a gestural precursor to speech.
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  32. Are some prima facie duties more binding than others?Michael Robinson - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (1):26-32.
    In The Right and the Good, W. D. Ross commits himself to the view that, in addition to being distinct and defeasible, some prima facie duties are more binding than others. David McNaughton has argued that there appears to be no way of making sense of this claim that is both coherent and consistent with Ross's overall picture. I offer an alternative way of understanding Ross's remarks about the comparative stringency of prima facie duties, which, in addition to being compatible (...)
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  33.  69
    Robust flickers of freedom.Michael Robinson - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (1):211-233.
    :This essay advances a version of the flicker of freedom defense of the Principle of Alternative Possibilities and shows that it is invulnerable to the major objections facing other versions of this defense. Proponents of the flicker defense argue that Frankfurt-style cases fail to undermine PAP because agents in these cases continue to possess alternative possibilities. Critics of the flicker strategy contend that the alternatives that remain open to agents in these cases are unable to rebuff Frankfurt-style attack on the (...)
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  34.  8
    Attention to emotion and reliance on feelings in decision-making: Variations on a pleasure principle.Michael D. Robinson, Robert J. Klein, Roberta L. Irvin & Avianna Z. McGregor - 2021 - Cognition 217 (C):104904.
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  35. Acting Women the Performing Self in the Late Nineteenth Centuryinaugural Lecture, 4 December 1991.Michael G. Robinson - 1991 - Loughborough University of Technology.
     
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  36.  74
    Experimental Philosophy of Science and Philosophical Differences across the Sciences.Brian Robinson, Chad Gonnerman & Michael O’Rourke - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (3):551-576.
    This paper contributes to the underdeveloped field of experimental philosophy of science. We examine variability in the philosophical views of scientists. Using data from Toolbox Dialogue Initiative, we analyze scientists’ responses to prompts on philosophical issues (methodology, confirmation, values, reality, reductionism, and motivation for scientific research) to assess variance in the philosophical views of physical scientists, life scientists, and social and behavioral scientists. We find six prompts about which differences arose, with several more that look promising for future research. We (...)
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  37. Modified Frankfurt-type counterexamples and flickers of freedom.Michael Robinson - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (2):177-194.
    A great deal of attention has been paid recently to the claim that traditional Frankfurt-type counterexamples to the Principle of Alternative Possibilities (PAP), which depend for their success on the presence of a perfectly reliable indicator (or prior sign ) of what an agent will freely do if left to act on his own, are guilty of begging the question against incompatibilists, since such indicators seem to presuppose a deterministic relation between an agent’s free action and its causal antecedents. Objections (...)
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  38.  20
    Anger as “seeing red”: Evidence for a perceptual association.Adam K. Fetterman, Michael D. Robinson & Brian P. Meier - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (8):1445-1458.
  39.  92
    The limits of limited-blockage Frankfurt-style cases.Michael Robinson - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (3):429-446.
    Philosophers employing Frankfurt-style cases to challenge the principle of alternative possibilities have mostly sought to construct scenarios that eliminate as many of an agent’s alternatives as possible—and all alternatives at the moment of action, within the agent’s control—without causally determining the agent’s actions. One of the chief difficulties for this traditional approach is that the closer one gets to ruling out absolutely all alternative possibilities the more it appears that agents’ actions in these cases are causally determined. “Limited-blockage” versions of (...)
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  40.  35
    ‘Woe Betides Anybody Who Tries to Turn me Down.’ A Qualitative Analysis of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms Following Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease.Philip E. Mosley, Katherine Robinson, Terry Coyne, Peter Silburn, Michael Breakspear & Adrian Carter - 2019 - Neuroethics 14 (1):47-63.
    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease can lead to the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms. These can include harmful changes in mood and behaviour that alienate family members and raise ethical questions about personal responsibility for actions committed under stimulation-dependent mental states. Qualitative interviews were conducted with twenty participants following subthalamic DBS at a movement disorders centre, in order to explore the meaning and significance of stimulation-related neuropsychiatric symptoms amongst a purposive sample of persons (...)
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  41.  54
    Truthmakers, Moral Responsibility, and an Alleged Counterexample to Rule A.Michael Robinson - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (6):1333-1339.
    Charles Hermes argues that the Direct Argument for the incompatibility of determinism and moral responsibility fails because one of the inference rules on which it relies, Rule A, is invalid. Rule A states that if a proposition p is broadly logically necessary, then p is true and no one is, or ever has been, even partly morally responsible for the fact that p. Hermes purports to offer a counterexample to Rule A which focuses on agents’ moral responsibility for disjunctions. Hermes’s (...)
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  42. Jennifer Cole Wright, Michael T. Warren, and Nancy E. Snow, Understanding Virtue: Theory and Measurement[REVIEW]Michael T. Dale - 2023 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 20 (1-2):202-205.
    Over the last few decades, virtue has become increasingly important in philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, and education. However, as each of these disciplines approaches virtue from a decidedly different perspective, it has proven difficult to come up with an understanding of virtue that satisfies the standards of all four disciplines. In their book, Jennifer Wright, Michael Warren, and Nancy Snow attempt to put forward such an understanding.
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  43.  33
    Book Review Section 6. [REVIEW]Michael S. Littleford, William Hare, Dale L. Brubaker, Louise M. Berman, Lawrence M. Knolle, Raymond C. Carleton, James La Point, Edmonia W. Davidson, Joseph Michel, William H. Boyer, Carol Ann Moore, Walter Doyle, Paul Saettler, John P. Driscoll, Lane F. Birkel, Emma C. Johnson, Bernard Cleveland, Patricia J. R. Dahl, J. M. Lucas, Albert Montare & Lennart L. Kopra - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (4):292-309.
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  44.  21
    Voluntarily chosen roles and conscientious objection in health care.Michael Robinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):718-722.
    The longstanding dominant view is that health care practitioners should be permitted to refrain from participating in medical interventions when they have a conscientious objection to doing so in a broad range of cases. In recent years, a growing minority have been fervently advocating a sea change. In their view, medical professionals should not be permitted to refuse to participate in medical interventions merely because doing so conflicts with their own moral or religious views. One of the most commonly offered (...)
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  45.  37
    Morality and Justice: Reading Boylan's a Just Society.John-Stewart Gordon, Michael Boylan, Robert Paul Churchill, James A. Donahue, Marcus Duwell, Dale Jacquette, Tanja Kohen, Christopher Lowry, Seumas Miller, Gabriel Palmer-Fernandez, Johann-Christian Poder, Edward H. Spence, Udo Schuklenk, Wanda Teays & Rosemarie Tong (eds.) - 2009 - Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
    The essays in this book engage the original and controversial claims from Michael Boylan's A Just Society. Each essay discusses Boylan's claims from a particular chapter and offers a critical analysis of these claims. Boylan responds to the essays in his lengthy and philosophically rich reply.
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  46.  20
    The Role of Empathy in Alcohol Use of Bullying Perpetrators and Victims: Lower Personal Empathic Distress Makes Male Perpetrators of Bullying More Vulnerable to Alcohol Use.Maren Prignitz, Tobias Banaschewski, Arun L. W. Bokde, Sylvane Desrivières, Antoine Grigis, Hugh Garavan, Penny Gowland, Andreas Heinz, Jean-Luc Martinot, Marie-Laure Paillère Martinot, Eric Artiges, Dimitri Papadopoulos Orfanos, Luise Poustka, Sarah Hohmann, Juliane H. Fröhner, Lauren Robinson, Michael N. Smolka, Henrik Walter, Jeanne M. Winterer, Robert Whelan, Gunter Schumann, Frauke Nees, Herta Flor & on Behalf of the Imagen Consortium - 2023 - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 20 (13):6286.
    Bullying often results in negative coping in victims, including an increased consumption of alcohol. Recently, however, an increase in alcohol use has also been reported among perpetrators of bullying. The factors triggering this pattern are still unclear. We investigated the role of empathy in the interaction between bullying and alcohol use in an adolescent sample (IMAGEN) at age 13.97 (±0.53) years (baseline (BL), N = 2165, 50.9% female) and age 16.51 (±0.61) years (follow-up 1 (FU1), N = 1185, 54.9% female). (...)
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  47. Cultural variation in cognitive flexibility reveals diversity in the development of executive functions.Cristine Legare, Michael Dale, Sarah Kim & Gedeon Deak - 2018 - Nature Scientific Reports 8 (16326):1-14.
    Cognitive flexibility, the adaptation of representations and responses to new task demands, improves dramatically in early childhood. It is unclear, however, whether flexibility is a coherent, unitary cognitive trait, or is an emergent dimension of task-specific performance that varies across populations with divergent experiences. Three-to 5-year-old English-speaking U.S. children and Tswana-speaking South African children completed two distinct language-processing cognitive flexibility tests: the FIM-Animates, a word-learning test, and the 3DCCS, a rule-switching test. U.S. and South African children did not differ in (...)
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  48.  27
    Humanistic Values and the Values of Humanities in Interdisciplinary Research.Brian Robinson, Stephanie Vasko, Chad Gonnerman, Markus Christen, Michael O'Rourke & Daniel Steel - 2016 - Cogent Arts and Humanities 3:1123080.
    Research integrating the perspectives of different disciplines, or interdisciplinary research, has become increasingly common in academia and is considered important for its ability to address complex questions and problems. This mode of research aims to leverage differences among disciplines in generating a more complex understanding of the research landscape. To interact successfully with other disciplines, researchers must appreciate their differences, and this requires recognizing how the research landscape looks from the perspective of other disciplines. One central aspect of these disciplinary (...)
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  49. Medical Encounter.Gail Coover, Dale Guenter, Elizabeth Clark, Janet Hortin, Joseph F. O’Donnell, Michael W. Rabow, Rachel N. Remen, Aanand D. Naik, Krista Hirschmann & Nancy Berlinger - 2007 - Complexity 21 (1).
     
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  50.  35
    The justice motive in everyday life: essays in honor of Melvin J. Lerner.Melvin J. Lerner, Michael Ross & Dale T. Miller (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book contains new essays in honor of Melvin J. Lerner, a pioneer in the psychological study of justice. The contributors to this volume are internationally renowned scholars from psychology, business, and law. They examine the role of justice motivation in a wide variety of contexts, including workplace violence, affirmative action programs, helping or harming innocent victims and how people react to their own fate. Contributors explore fundamental issues such as whether people's interest in justice is motivated by self-interest or (...)
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