Results for 'Michael D. Nunez'

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  1.  31
    Individual differences in attention influence perceptual decision making.Michael D. Nunez - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  2.  53
    Moving Beyond ERP Components: A Selective Review of Approaches to Integrate EEG and Behavior.David A. Bridwell, James F. Cavanagh, Anne G. E. Collins, Michael D. Nunez, Ramesh Srinivasan, Sebastian Stober & Vince D. Calhoun - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  3.  14
    Set Theory and its Philosophy: A Critical Introduction.Michael D. Potter - 2004 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Michael Potter presents a comprehensive new philosophical introduction to set theory. Anyone wishing to work on the logical foundations of mathematics must understand set theory, which lies at its heart. Potter offers a thorough account of cardinal and ordinal arithmetic, and the various axiom candidates. He discusses in detail the project of set-theoretic reduction, which aims to interpret the rest of mathematics in terms of set theory. The key question here is how to deal with the paradoxes that bedevil (...)
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  4.  91
    How to determine the boundaries of the mind: a Markov blanket proposal.Michael D. Kirchhoff & Julian Kiverstein - 2019 - Synthese 198 (5):4791-4810.
    We develop a truism of commonsense psychology that perception and action constitute the boundaries of the mind. We do so however not on the basis of commonsense psychology, but by using the notion of a Markov blanket originally employed to describe the topological properties of causal networks. We employ the Markov blanket formalism to propose precise criteria for demarcating the boundaries of the mind that unlike other rival candidates for “marks of the cognitive” avoids begging the question in the extended (...)
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  5. Autopoiesis, free energy, and the life–mind continuity thesis.Michael D. Kirchhoff - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2519-2540.
    The life–mind continuity thesis is difficult to study, especially because the relation between life and mind is not yet fully understood, and given that there is still no consensus view neither on what qualifies as life nor on what defines mind. Rather than taking up the much more difficult task of addressing the many different ways of explaining how life relates to mind, and vice versa, this paper considers two influential accounts addressing how best to understand the life–mind continuity thesis: (...)
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  6. Learning to listen: Epistemic injustice and the child.Michael D. Burroughs & Deborah Tollefsen - 2016 - Episteme 13 (3):359-377.
    In Epistemic Injustice Miranda Fricker argues that there is a distinctively epistemic type of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in his or her capacity as a knower. Fricker's examples of identity-prejudicial credibility deficit primarily involve gender, race, and class, in which individuals are given less credibility due to prejudicial stereotypes. We argue that children, as a class, are also subject to testimonial injustice and receive less epistemic credibility than they deserve. To illustrate the prevalence of testimonial injustice against (...)
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  7. Predictive processing, perceiving and imagining: Is to perceive to imagine, or something close to it?Michael D. Kirchhoff - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (3):751-767.
    This paper examines the relationship between perceiving and imagining on the basis of predictive processing models in neuroscience. Contrary to the received view in philosophy of mind, which holds that perceiving and imagining are essentially distinct, these models depict perceiving and imagining as deeply unified and overlapping. It is argued that there are two mutually exclusive implications of taking perception and imagination to be fundamentally unified. The view defended is what I dub the ecological–enactive view given that it does not (...)
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  8. Second-order Logic Still Wild.Michael D. Resnik - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):75-87.
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  9.  29
    A Qualitative Approach to Responsible Conduct of Research Training Development: Identification of Metacognitive Strategies.Michael D. Mumford, Elaine S. Godfrey, Sydney T. Sevier, Richard T. Marcy & Vykinta Kligyte - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):33-39.
    Although Responsible Conduct of Research training is common in the sciences, the effectiveness of RCR training is open to question. Three key factors appear to be particularly important in ensuring the effectiveness of ethics education programs: educational efforts should be tied to day-to-day practices in the field, educational efforts should provide strategies for working through the ethical problems people are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice, and educational efforts should be embedded in a broader program of on-going career development efforts. (...)
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  10.  43
    Attuning to the World: The Diachronic Constitution of the Extended Conscious Mind.Michael D. Kirchhoff & Julian Kiverstein - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  11.  25
    Choices: An Introduction to Decision Theory.Michael D. Resnik - 1987 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
  12.  9
    Wittgenstein's notes on logic.Michael D. Potter - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The book features the complete text of the Notesi in a critical edition, with a detailed discussion of the circumstances in which they were compiled, leading to ...
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  13.  46
    Aspects of Scientific Explanation.Michael D. Resnik - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (1):139-140.
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  14.  33
    Science without Numbers.Michael D. Resnik - 1983 - Noûs 17 (3):514-519.
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  15. Choices: An Introduction to Decision Theory.Michael D. Resnik - 1990 - Behavior and Philosophy 18 (2):73-78.
     
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  16. Feminist Epistemology and Social Epistemology: Another Uneasy Alliance.Michael D. Doan - 2024 - Apa Studies on Feminism and Philosophy 23 (2):11-19.
    In this paper I explore Phyllis Rooney’s 2003 chapter, “Feminist Epistemology and Naturalized Epistemology: An Uneasy Alliance,” taking guidance from her critique of naturalized epistemology in pursuing my own analysis of another uneasy alliance: that between feminist epistemology and social epistemology. Investigating some of the background assumptions at work in prominent conceptions of social epistemology, I consider recent analyses of "epistemic bubbles" to ask how closely such analyses are aligned with ongoing research in feminist epistemology. I argue that critical feminist (...)
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  17.  34
    A sensemaking approach to ethics training for scientists: Preliminary evidence of training effectiveness.Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly, Ryan P. Brown, Stephen T. Murphy, Jason H. Hill, Alison L. Antes, Ethan P. Waples & Lynn D. Devenport - 2008 - Ethics and Behavior 18 (4):315 – 339.
    In recent years, we have seen a new concern with ethics training for research and development professionals. Although ethics training has become more common, the effectiveness of the training being provided is open to question. In the present effort, a new ethics training course was developed that stresses the importance of the strategies people apply to make sense of ethical problems. The effectiveness of this training was assessed in a sample of 59 doctoral students working in the biological and social (...)
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  18.  43
    Evaluating Ethics Education Programs: A Multilevel Approach.Michael D. Mumford, Logan Steele & Logan L. Watts - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (1):37-60.
    Although education in the responsible conduct of research is considered necessary, evidence bearing on the effectiveness of these programs in improving research ethics has indicated that, although some programs are successful, many fail. Accordingly, there is a need for systematic evaluation of ethics education programs. In the present effort, we examine procedures for evaluation of ethics education programs from a multilevel perspective: examining both within-program evaluation and cross-program evaluation. With regard to within-program evaluation, we note requisite designs and measures for (...)
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  19.  11
    From Biotechnology to Nanotechnology: What Can We Learn from Earlier Technologies?Michael D. Mehta - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):34-39.
    Using Canada as a case study, this article argues that regulating biotechnology and nanotechnology is made unnecessarily complex and inherently unstable because of a failure to consult the public early and of-ten enough. Furthermore, it is argued that future regulators (and promoters) of nanotechnology may learn valuable lessons from the mistakes made in regulating biotechnology.
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  20.  8
    Frege and the philosophy of mathematics.Michael D. Resnik - 1980 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
  21.  21
    Strategies in Forecasting Outcomes in Ethical Decision-Making: Identifying and Analyzing the Causes of the Problem.Michael D. Mumford, Chase E. Thiel, Jared J. Caughron, Xiaoqian Wang, Alison L. Antes & Cheryl K. Stenmark - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):110-127.
    This study examined the role of key causal analysis strategies in forecasting and ethical decision-making. Undergraduate participants took on the role of the key actor in several ethical problems and were asked to identify and analyze the causes, forecast potential outcomes, and make a decision about each problem. Time pressure and analytic mindset were manipulated while participants worked through these problems. The results indicated that forecast quality was associated with decision ethicality, and the identification of the critical causes of the (...)
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  22.  15
    Arendt and the Legitimate Expectation for Hospitality and Membership Today.Michael D. Weinman - 2018 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 5 (1):127-149.
    What does the growing tide of displaced persons today teach us about the ongoing paradoxes of human rights regimes, which rely on the particular sovereignty of nation-states for their constitution and application but are framed and normatively justified as universal? Working with Arendt’s defense of ‘the right to have rights’ in response to the problem of statelessness which is the practical lynchpin of these historical and theoretical tensions, I specify that and why any person on earth, regardless of their legal (...)
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  23.  36
    Young and restless: validation of the Mind-Wandering Questionnaire reveals disruptive impact of mind-wandering for youth.Michael D. Mrazek, Dawa T. Phillips, Michael S. Franklin, James M. Broadway & Jonathan W. Schooler - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  24. Mathematics as a Science of Patterns.Michael D. Resnik & Stewart Shapiro - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (4):652-656.
     
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  25.  32
    Insomnia and the attribution process.Michael D. Storms & Richard E. Nisbett - 1970 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 16 (2):319-328.
    Gave 42 19-26 yr. old insomniac Ss placebo pills to take a few min. before going to bed. Some Ss were told that the pills would cause arousal, and others were told that the pills would reduce arousal. As predicted, arousal Ss got to sleep more quickly than they had on nights without the pills, presumably because they attributed their arousal to the pills rather than to their emotions, and as a consequence were less emotional. Also as predicted, relaxation Ss (...)
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  26. Holistic realism: A response to Katz on holism and intuition.Michael D. Resnik & Nicoletta Orlandi - 2003 - Philosophical Forum 34 (3-4):301-315.
  27.  12
    Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Assessing the Nature of Innovation in These Fields.Michael D. Mehta - 2002 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 22 (4):269-273.
    Sociologists of science and others have long been interested in how advances in science come about, and their potential social and economic impacts. Developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology will provide social scientists with a unique opportunity to explore how scientific activities form de novo. Additionally, scientists will have the opportunity to examine the factors that drive science and technology in certain directions by considering how different models of innovation may explain how the topography of the knowledge-based economy is being shaped (...)
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  28.  20
    Why Are No Animal Communication Systems Simple Languages?Michael D. Beecher - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Individuals of some animal species have been taught simple versions of human language despite their natural communication systems failing to rise to the level of a simple language. How is it, then, that some animals can master a version of language, yet none of them deploy this capacity in their own communication system? I first examine the key design features that are often used to evaluate language-like properties of natural animal communication systems. I then consider one candidate animal system, bird (...)
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  29.  26
    Serial modules in parallel: The psychological refractory period and perfect time-sharing.Michael D. Byrne & John R. Anderson - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):847-869.
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  30.  14
    A Model of Knower‐Level Behavior in Number Concept Development.Michael D. Lee & Barbara W. Sarnecka - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (1):51-67.
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  31.  7
    Computation and Mathematical Empiricism.Michael D. Resnik - 1989 - Philosophical Topics 17 (2):129-144.
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  32.  35
    The Limits of Moral Maturity.Michael D. K. Ing - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):567-572.
  33.  63
    Navigating the Penumbra: Children and Moral Responsibility.Michael D. Burroughs - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):77-101.
    Child moral agency is dismissed in many historical and contemporary accounts based on children's supposed lack or marginal possession of agency-bearing capacities, including reason, deliberation, and judgment, amongst others. Given its prominence in the philosophical canon, I call this the traditional view of child agency. Recent advancements in moral developmental psychology challenge the traditional view, pointing toward the possession of relevant capacities and competencies for moral and responsible agency in early and middle childhood. I argue that both views—traditional and developmental—underdetermine (...)
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  34. Epistemic Injustice and Epistemic Redlining.Michael D. Doan - 2017 - Ethics and Social Welfare 11 (2):177-190.
    The practice of Emergency Management in Michigan raises anew the question of whose knowledge matters to whom and for what reasons, against the background of what projects, challenges, and systemic imperatives. In this paper, I offer a historical overview of state intervention laws across the United States, focusing specifically on Michigan’s Emergency Manager laws. I draw on recent analyses of these laws to develop an account of a phenomenon that I call epistemic redlining, which, I suggest, is a form of (...)
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  35.  6
    The American Discovery of Tradition, 1865–1942.Michael D. Clark - 2005 - LSU Press.
    Between the American Revolution and the Civil War many Americans professed to reject altogether the notion of adhering to tradition, perceiving it as a malign European influence. But by the beginning of the twentieth century, Americans had possibly become more tradition-minded than their European contemporaries. So argues Michael D. Clark in this incisive work of social and intellectual history. Challenging reigning assumptions, Clark maintains that in the period 1865 to 1942 Americans became more conscious of tradition as a social (...)
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  36.  55
    Born of Resentment: Yuan 怨 in Early Confucian Thought.Michael D. K. Ing - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (1):19-33.
    This essay explores the positive aspects of resentment in early Confucian thought. Specifically, it argues that from an early Confucian perspective, resentment is a frustration or anger that occurs when those close to us withhold their care or when they otherwise injure us. Stated succinctly, resentment is a result of frustrated desire for affection. It is a sign that we require the care of significant others, and that we are vulnerable to their concern or neglect. When understood appropriately, resentment signals (...)
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  37.  15
    Articles: Validation of ethical decision making measures: Evidence for a new set of measures.Michael D. Mumford, Lynn D. Devenport, Ryan P. Brown, Shane Connelly, Stephen T. Murphy, Jason H. Hill & Alison L. Antes - 2006 - Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):319 – 345.
    Ethical decision making measures are widely applied as the principal dependent variable used in studies of research integrity. However, evidence bearing on the internal and external validity of these measures is not available. In this study, ethical decision making measures were administered to 102 graduate students in the biological, health, and social sciences, along with measures examining exposure to ethical breaches and the severity of punishments recommended. The ethical decision making measure was found to be related to exposure to ethical (...)
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  38. Law and bioethics / edited by Michael Freeman.Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  39.  21
    Professional Decision-Making in Research : The Validity of a New Measure.Michael D. Mumford, Alison L. Antes, Kari A. Baldwin, Jillon S. Vander Wal, Raymond C. Tait, John T. Chibnall & James M. DuBois - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):391-416.
    In this paper, we report on the development and validity of the Professional Decision-Making in Research measure, a vignette-based test that examines decision-making strategies used by investigators when confronted with challenging situations in the context of empirical research. The PDR was administered online with a battery of validity measures to a group of NIH-funded researchers and research trainees who were diverse in terms of age, years of experience, types of research, and race. The PDR demonstrated adequate reliability and parallel form (...)
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  40. Reapplying behavioral symmetry: Public choice and choice architecture.Michael D. Thomas - 2019 - Public Choice 180:11–25.
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  41.  73
    They can't be believed: children, intersectionality, and epistemic injustice.Michael D. Baumtrog & Harmony Peach - 2019 - Journal of Global Ethics 15 (3):213-232.
    ABSTRACTChildren are often perceived to be less credible testifiers than adults. Their inexperience and affinity for play can provide reason to question their credibility and sincerity as truth tellers. The discrediting of children's testimonial claims can, however, result in an injustice when it stems from an uncritical age-related identity prejudice. This injustice can lead to several consequences varying in severity, with the worst cases leading to their deaths. More commonly, and especially when this injustice is considered in combination with other (...)
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  42.  52
    To Whistleblow or Not to Whistleblow: Affective and Cognitive Differences in Reporting Peers and Advisors.Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Logan Steele, Paul Partlow, Megan Turner, Cory Higgs & Tristan McIntosh - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):171-210.
    Traditional whistleblowing theories have purported that whistleblowers engage in a rational process in determining whether or not to blow the whistle on misconduct. However, stressors inherent to whistleblowing often impede rational thinking and act as a barrier to effective whistleblowing. The negative impact of these stressors on whistleblowing may be made worse depending on who engages in the misconduct: a peer or advisor. In the present study, participants are presented with an ethical scenario where either a peer or advisor engages (...)
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  43.  18
    Bayesian statistical inference in psychology: Comment on Trafimow (2003).Michael D. Lee & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):662-668.
  44. Un bras d'athlete et une haute voix de lamentateur?: why I love Jacques Maritain.Michael D. Torre - 2018 - In Heidi Marie Giebel (ed.), The things that matter: essays inspired by the later work of Jacques Maritain. Washington, D.C.: American Maritain Association.
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  45.  23
    Second-order logic still wild.Michael D. Resnik - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):75-87.
  46.  15
    Lloyd's introduction to jurisprudence.Michael D. A. Freeman - 2001 - London: Sweet & Maxwell. Edited by Lloyd of Hampstead & Dennis Lloyd.
    Previous ed. by : Lord Lloyd of Hampstead and M.D.A. Freeman.
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  47.  10
    II. Frege as Idealist and then Realist.Michael D. Resnik - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):350-357.
    Michael Dummett argued that Frege was a realist while Hans Sluga countered that he was an objective idealist in the rationalist tradition of Kant and Lotze. Sluga ties Frege's idealism to the context principle which he argues Frege never gave up. It is argued that Sluga has correctly interpreted the pre?1891 Frege while Dummett is correct concerning the later period. It is also claimed that the context principle was dropped prior to 1891 to be replaced by the doctrine of (...)
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  48.  68
    Hannah Arendt, “Reflections on Little Rock,” and White Ignorance.Michael D. Burroughs - 2015 - Critical Philosophy of Race 3 (1):52-78.
    Hannah Arendt has been criticized for her “blindness” to the sociopolitical significance of race and racism in the West, most notably, in her “Reflections on Little Rock.” I consider three prominent explanations for Arendt's wrongheaded conclusions in “Reflections.” First, the “category interpretation” presents Arendt's conclusions as resulting from her rigid application of philosophical categories—the public, the private, and the social—to events in Little Rock. Second, the “racial prejudice interpretation” presents Arendt's conclusions as resulting from her anti-black racism and her dismissal (...)
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  49. The Elusive Distinction Between Mathematics and Natural Science.Michael D. Resnik - 1997 - In Michael David Resnik (ed.), Mathematics as a science of patterns. New York ;: Oxford University Press.
    It is commonly believed that the epistemology of mathematics must be different from the epistemology of science because their objects are different in kind, i.e. metaphysically different. In this chapter, I want to suggest that some careful work must be done before we can take the distinction between physical and mathematical objects for granted. This distinction has traditionally been drawn by making reference to location, causal powers, detectability in principle, and change in properties. By analysing the ontology of theoretical physics, (...)
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  50. Relational Solidarity and Climate Change.Michael D. Doan & Susan Sherwin - 2016 - In Cheryl Macpherson (ed.), Climate Change and Health: Bioethical Insights into Values and Policy. Springer. pp. 79-88.
    The evidence is overwhelming that members of particularly wealthy and industry-owning segments of Western societies have much larger carbon footprints than most other humans, and thereby contribute far more than their “fair share” to the enormous problem of climate change. Nonetheless, in this paper we shall counsel against a strategy focused primarily on blaming and shaming and propose, instead, a change in the ethical conversation about climate change. We recommend a shift in the ethical framework from a focus on the (...)
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