5 found
Order:
  1.  1
    From Biotechnology to Nanotechnology: What Can We Learn from Earlier Technologies?Michael D. Mehta - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):34-39.
    Using Canada as a case study, this article argues that regulating biotechnology and nanotechnology is made unnecessarily complex and inherently unstable because of a failure to consult the public early and of-ten enough. Furthermore, it is argued that future regulators of nanotechnology may learn valuable lessons from the mistakes made in regulating biotechnology.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  2.  2
    Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Assessing the Nature of Innovation in These Fields.Michael D. Mehta - 2002 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 22 (4):269-273.
    Sociologists of science and others have long been interested in how advances in science come about, and their potential social and economic impacts. Developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology will provide social scientists with a unique opportunity to explore how scientific activities form de novo. Additionally, scientists will have the opportunity to examine the factors that drive science and technology in certain directions by considering how different models of innovation may explain how the topography of the knowledge-based economy is being shaped (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3.  3
    Microsystems and Nanoscience for Biomedical Applications: A View to the Future.Christopher J. Backhouse, Karan V. I. S. Kaler, Timothy Caulfield, Michael D. Mehta & Linda M. Pilarski - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):40-45.
    At present there is an enormous discrepancy between our nanotechnological capabilities, our social wisdom, and consensus on how to apply them. To date, cost considerations have greatly constrained our application of nanotechnologies. However, novel advances in microsystem platform technologies are about to greatly diminish that economic constraint while developing new industries. Properly used in a solid legal and ethical framework, within an educated population, these advances will vastly enrich our quality of life without being intrusive. Improperly used, these technologies could (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Climate Change and Biotechnology: Moving Toward a Carbohydrate-Based Economy.Michael D. Mehta - 2003 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 23 (2):102-105.
    Advances in biotechnology make possible the transition toward a carbohydrate-based economy. By modifying plants to sequester more carbon and survive on marginal lands, more cost-effective means for using biomass are explored. This article discusses how better use of biomass can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and poses questions about how this transition can occur.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Nanotechnology and the Developing World: Lab-on-Chip Technology for Health and Environmental Applications.Michael D. Mehta - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (5):400-407.
    This article argues that advances in nanotechnology in general, and lab-on-chip technology in particular, have the potential to benefit the developing world in its quest to control risks to human health and the environment. Based on the “risk society” thesis of Ulrich Beck, it is argued that the developed world must realign its science and technology policy priorities to meet some of the most pressing needs of humanity.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation