7 found
Order:
  1.  21
    The Limits of Moral Maturity.Michael D. K. Ing - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):567-572.
  2.  36
    Born of Resentment: Yuan 怨 in Early Confucian Thought.Michael D. K. Ing - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (1):19-33.
    This essay explores the positive aspects of resentment in early Confucian thought. Specifically, it argues that from an early Confucian perspective, resentment is a frustration or anger that occurs when those close to us withhold their care or when they otherwise injure us. Stated succinctly, resentment is a result of frustrated desire for affection. It is a sign that we require the care of significant others, and that we are vulnerable to their concern or neglect. When understood appropriately, resentment signals (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  6
    Sages, Integrity, and the Paradox of Vulnerability: Reply to Chung, McLeod 1, and Seok.Michael D. K. Ing - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (3):401-408.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  22
    Two Virtuous Actions Cannot Both Be Completed.Michael D. K. Ing - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):659-684.
    This essay highlights an alternative tradition of understanding value conflicts in early Confucian thought. In contrast to a prominent position among interpreters that argues for the resolvability or harmonization of conflicting values, I argue that some early Confucians conceptualized value conflicts as irresolvable. In other words, when meaningful aspects of a situation come into tension with each other and values are threatened to be either left unfulfilled or harmed, early Confucians put forth a variety of views. Some believed that all (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  20
    Philosophy in Western Han Dynasty China.Michael D. K. Ing - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (6):289-304.
    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that there are ample resources in the English-speaking academic community to enable philosophers who cannot read Chinese to work with material from the Western Han dynasty in their research or teaching. It discusses three kinds of resources, with the aim of developing a community of philosophers engaged in a sustained conversation about Western Han thought. These resources are histories that describe various aspects of the Han dynasty, translations of key texts, and intellectual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  6
    Précis to The Vulnerability of Integrity in Early Confucian Though.Michael D. K. Ing - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (3):369-372.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  4
    Things Endure While We Fade Away: Tao Yuanming on Being Himself.Michael D. K. Ing - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):395-418.
    This article will argue that Tao Yuanming 陶淵明 recognized a tension between being himself and the natural transformations of the world. While he advocated a kind of ziran zhuyi 自然 主義, he did not believe that he, or human beings in general, were predisposed to accept the inevitable changes of the world. Hence, his "naturalism" is not necessarily about fitting into his natural surroundings, despite the fact that he relies on these surroundings in his poetry, and that contemporary scholars sometimes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark