Results for 'Michael D. Ashfield'

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  1. Against the Minimalistic Reading of Epistemic Contextualism: A Reply to Wolfgang Freitag.Michael D. Ashfield - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (1):111-125.
    Several philosophers have argued that the factivity of knowledge poses a problem for epistemic contextualism (EC), which they have construed as a knowability problem. On a proposed minimalistic reading of EC’s commitments, Wolfgang Freitag argues that factivity yields no knowability problem for EC. I begin by explaining how factivity is thought to generate a contradiction out of paradigmatic contextualist cases on a certain reading of EC’s commitments. This reductio results in some kind of reflexivity problem for the contextualist when it (...)
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  2. Lloyd's introduction to jurisprudence.Michael D. A. Freeman - 2001 - London: Sweet & Maxwell. Edited by Lloyd of Hampstead & Dennis Lloyd.
    Previous ed. by : Lord Lloyd of Hampstead and M.D.A. Freeman.
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  3. The professional–client relationship.Michael D. Bayles - 1988 - In Joan C. Callahan (ed.), Ethical issues in professional life. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 113--120.
     
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  4.  92
    Reparations to Wronged Groups.Michael D. Bayles - 1973 - Analysis 33 (6):182 - 184.
  5.  7
    Big Data and Research Opportunities Using HRAF Databases.Michael D. Fischer & Carol R. Ember - 2018 - In Shu-Heng Chen (ed.), Big Data in Computational Social Science and Humanities. Springer Verlag. pp. 323-336.
    The HRAF databases, eHRAF World Cultures and eHRAF Archaeology, each containing large corpora of curated text subject-indexed at the paragraph-level by anthropologists, were designed to facilitate rapid retrieval of information. The texts describe social and cultural life in past and present societies around the world. As of the spring of 2018, eHRAF contains almost three million indexed “paragraph” units from over 8000 documents describing over 400 societies and archaeological traditions. This chapter first discusses concrete problems of scale resulting from large (...)
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  6.  43
    Identifying Ethical Considerations for Machine Learning Healthcare Applications.Danton S. Char, Michael D. Abràmoff & Chris Feudtner - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (11):7-17.
    Along with potential benefits to healthcare delivery, machine learning healthcare applications raise a number of ethical concerns. Ethical evaluations of ML-HCAs will need to structure th...
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  7. Collective Inaction and Collective Epistemic Agency.Michael D. Doan - 2020 - In Saba Bazargan-Forward & Deborah Tollefsen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Collective Responsibility. Routledge. pp. 202-215.
    In this chapter I offer a critique of the received way of thinking about responsibility for collective inaction and propose an alternative approach that takes as its point of departure the epistemic agency exhibited by people navigating impossible situations together. One such situation is becoming increasingly common in the context of climate change: so-called “natural” disasters wreaking havoc on communities—flooding homes, collapsing infrastructures, and straining the capacities of existing organizations to safeguard lives and livelihoods. What happens when philosophical reflection begins (...)
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  8.  12
    Deep Agreements.Michael D. Baumtrog - forthcoming - Episteme:1-16.
    Recent research has highlighted the character and importance of the study of agreement. This paper, paralleling work on the more familiar concept of deep disagreement, will provide a first articulation of the character and implications of deep agreements, that is, agreements so deep that disagreement cannot overcome them. To do so, I start by outlining the main features of deep disagreement. I then provide a brief characterization of agreement in general to ground the discussion of the unique characteristics of deep (...)
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  9.  15
    Ethical hermeneutics: rationality in Enrique Dussel's Philosophy of liberation.Michael D. Barber - 1998 - New York: Fordham University Press.
    The essence of Dussel's thought is presented through the concept of "ethical hermeneutics" which seeks to interpret reality from the viewpoint of what Emmanuel Levinas presents as the "other" - those who are vanquished, forgotten, or excluded from existent socio-political or cultural systems. Barber traces Dussel's development toward Levinas' philosophy through his discussion of the Hegelian dialectic and through the stages of Dussel's own ethical theory.
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  10. Holism and horizon: Husserl and McDowell on non-conceptual content.Michael D. Barber - 2008 - Husserl Studies 24 (2):79-97.
    John McDowell rejects the idea that non-conceptual content can rationally justify empirical claims—a task for which it is ill-fitted by its non-conceptual nature. This paper considers three possible objections to his views: he cannot distinguish empty conception from the perceptual experience of an object; perceptual discrimination outstrips the capacity of concepts to keep pace; and experience of the empirical world is more extensive than the conceptual focusing within it. While endorsing McDowell’s rejection of what he means by non-conceptual content, and (...)
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  11. Character, purpose, and criminal responsibility.Michael D. Bayles - 1982 - Law and Philosophy 1 (1):5 - 20.
    This paper explores analyzing criminal responsibility from the Humean position that blame is for character traits. If untoward acts indicate undesirable character traits, then the agent is blameworthy; if they do not, then the actor is not blameworthy — he has an excuse. A distinctive feature of this approach is that that voluntariness of acts is irrelevant to determining blameworthiness.This analysis is then applied to a variety of issues in criminal law. Mens supports inferences to character traits, and the Humean (...)
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  12.  33
    Moral Theory and Application.Michael D. Bayles - 1984 - Social Theory and Practice 10 (1):97-120.
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  13. Choices: An Introduction to Decision Theory.Michael D. Resnik - 1987 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
  14.  18
    Why Are No Animal Communication Systems Simple Languages?Michael D. Beecher - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Individuals of some animal species have been taught simple versions of human language despite their natural communication systems failing to rise to the level of a simple language. How is it, then, that some animals can master a version of language, yet none of them deploy this capacity in their own communication system? I first examine the key design features that are often used to evaluate language-like properties of natural animal communication systems. I then consider one candidate animal system, bird (...)
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  15.  24
    Serial modules in parallel: The psychological refractory period and perfect time-sharing.Michael D. Byrne & John R. Anderson - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):847-869.
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  16.  19
    Drugs In Sport: Have They Practiced Too Hard? A Response to Schneider and Butcher.Michael D. Burke - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):47-66.
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    Drugs In Sport: Have They Practiced Too Hard? A Response to Schneider and Butcher.Michael D. Burke & Terence J. Roberts - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):47-66.
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    Equality and diversity: phenomenological investigations of prejudice and discrimination.Michael D. Barber - 2001 - Amherst, N.Y.: Humanity Books.
  19. Method and the third : bridges between the philosophy of liberation and transcendental pragmatics.Michael D. Barber - 1993 - In Raúl Fornet-Betancourt (ed.), Die Diskursethik und ihre lateinamerikanische Kritik: Dokumentation des Seminars interkultureller Dialog im Nord-Süd-Konflikt: die hermeneutische Herausforderung. Aachen: Verlag der Augustinus Buchhandlung.
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  20.  60
    Navigating the Penumbra: Children and Moral Responsibility.Michael D. Burroughs - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):77-101.
    Child moral agency is dismissed in many historical and contemporary accounts based on children's supposed lack or marginal possession of agency-bearing capacities, including reason, deliberation, and judgment, amongst others. Given its prominence in the philosophical canon, I call this the traditional view of child agency. Recent advancements in moral developmental psychology challenge the traditional view, pointing toward the possession of relevant capacities and competencies for moral and responsible agency in early and middle childhood. I argue that both views—traditional and developmental—underdetermine (...)
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  21.  89
    How to determine the boundaries of the mind: a Markov blanket proposal.Michael D. Kirchhoff & Julian Kiverstein - 2019 - Synthese 198 (5):4791-4810.
    We develop a truism of commonsense psychology that perception and action constitute the boundaries of the mind. We do so however not on the basis of commonsense psychology, but by using the notion of a Markov blanket originally employed to describe the topological properties of causal networks. We employ the Markov blanket formalism to propose precise criteria for demarcating the boundaries of the mind that unlike other rival candidates for “marks of the cognitive” avoids begging the question in the extended (...)
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  22. Autopoiesis, free energy, and the life–mind continuity thesis.Michael D. Kirchhoff - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2519-2540.
    The life–mind continuity thesis is difficult to study, especially because the relation between life and mind is not yet fully understood, and given that there is still no consensus view neither on what qualifies as life nor on what defines mind. Rather than taking up the much more difficult task of addressing the many different ways of explaining how life relates to mind, and vice versa, this paper considers two influential accounts addressing how best to understand the life–mind continuity thesis: (...)
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  23. Harm to the unconceived.Michael D. Bayles - 1976 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (3):292-304.
  24.  40
    Contemporary utilitarianism.Michael D. Bayles - 1968 - Garden City, N.Y.,: Anchor Books.
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    Professional Power and Self-Regulation.Michael D. Bayles - 1986 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 5 (2):26-46.
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    A working memory model of a common procedural error.Michael D. Byrne & Susan Bovair - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (1):31-61.
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  27.  67
    Hannah Arendt, “Reflections on Little Rock,” and White Ignorance.Michael D. Burroughs - 2015 - Critical Philosophy of Race 3 (1):52-78.
    Hannah Arendt has been criticized for her “blindness” to the sociopolitical significance of race and racism in the West, most notably, in her “Reflections on Little Rock.” I consider three prominent explanations for Arendt's wrongheaded conclusions in “Reflections.” First, the “category interpretation” presents Arendt's conclusions as resulting from her rigid application of philosophical categories—the public, the private, and the social—to events in Little Rock. Second, the “racial prejudice interpretation” presents Arendt's conclusions as resulting from her anti-black racism and her dismissal (...)
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  28. Frege and the philosophy of mathematics.Michael D. Resnik - 1980 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
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    A Problem of Clean Hands.Michael D. Bayles - 1979 - Social Theory and Practice 5 (2):165-181.
  30.  63
    Intuitions in Ethics.Michael D. Bayles - 1984 - Dialogue 23 (3):439-455.
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  31.  27
    Phenomenology and Rigid Dualisms: Joachim Renn’s Critique of Alfred Schutz.Michael D. Barber - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (3):269-282.
    Joachim Renn argues that Schutz fails to integrate two fundamental strands in his work: phenomenology and pragmatism. Gaps between separated consciousnesses block synchronization and access to others, and objective symbol schemes, absorbed within the egological outlook, cannot bridge these gaps. Renn, however, construes phenomenology as practicing a solipsistic withdrawal of a self cut off from its environs, denies that contents correlative to individual intentional acts can be objective and common, and overlooks the intricacies of Schutz’s descriptive methodology. Furthermore, for Renn, (...)
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  32.  36
    From sorcery to witchcraft: clerical conceptions of magic in the later Middle Ages.Michael D. Bailey - 2001 - Speculum 76 (4):960-990.
  33.  43
    Hume On Blame And Excuse.Michael D. Bayles - 1976 - Hume Studies 2 (April):17-33.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:HUME ON BLAME AND EXCUSE17. Hume's account of blame and excuse differs in fundamental respects from many contemporary ones. Many contemporary views, ultimately derived from the Kantian dictum that 'ought' implies 'can', base excuses on the nonvoluntary character of an action. For example, H. L. A. Hart argues that the basic requirements for responsibility are that a person have the capacity and a fair opportunity to do what is (...)
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  34. Predictive processing, perceiving and imagining: Is to perceive to imagine, or something close to it?Michael D. Kirchhoff - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (3):751-767.
    This paper examines the relationship between perceiving and imagining on the basis of predictive processing models in neuroscience. Contrary to the received view in philosophy of mind, which holds that perceiving and imagining are essentially distinct, these models depict perceiving and imagining as deeply unified and overlapping. It is argued that there are two mutually exclusive implications of taking perception and imagination to be fundamentally unified. The view defended is what I dub the ecological–enactive view given that it does not (...)
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  35.  51
    Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy.Michael D. Beaty (ed.) - 1990 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy begins by presenting Plantingas essay, and the chapters that follow address issues in three traditional areas of interest to philosophers: epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics.
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  36. Considering the roles of values in practical reasoning argumentation evaluation.Michael D. Baumtrog - 2013 - Virtues of Argumentation. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA).
    Building upon the role values take in Walton’s theory of practical reasoning, this paper will frame the question of how values should be evaluated into the broader question of what reasonable practical argumentation is. The thesis argued for is that if a positive evaluation of practical reasoning argumentation requires that the argument avoid a morally negative conclusion, then the role of values should be given a central, rather than supportive, position in practical argument evaluation.
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  37. Learning to listen: Epistemic injustice and the child.Michael D. Burroughs & Deborah Tollefsen - 2016 - Episteme 13 (3):359-377.
    In Epistemic Injustice Miranda Fricker argues that there is a distinctively epistemic type of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in his or her capacity as a knower. Fricker's examples of identity-prejudicial credibility deficit primarily involve gender, race, and class, in which individuals are given less credibility due to prejudicial stereotypes. We argue that children, as a class, are also subject to testimonial injustice and receive less epistemic credibility than they deserve. To illustrate the prevalence of testimonial injustice against (...)
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  38.  66
    They can't be believed: children, intersectionality, and epistemic injustice.Michael D. Baumtrog & Harmony Peach - 2019 - Journal of Global Ethics 15 (3):213-232.
    ABSTRACTChildren are often perceived to be less credible testifiers than adults. Their inexperience and affinity for play can provide reason to question their credibility and sincerity as truth tellers. The discrediting of children's testimonial claims can, however, result in an injustice when it stems from an uncritical age-related identity prejudice. This injustice can lead to several consequences varying in severity, with the worst cases leading to their deaths. More commonly, and especially when this injustice is considered in combination with other (...)
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  39. Choices: An Introduction to Decision Theory.Michael D. Resnik - 1990 - Behavior and Philosophy 18 (2):73-78.
     
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  40. Second-order logic still wild.Michael D. Resnik - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):75-87.
  41.  31
    Devotion, Diversity, and Reasoning: Religion and Medical Ethics.Michael D. Dahnke - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):709-722.
    Most modern ethicists and ethics textbooks assert that religion holds little or no place in ethics, including fields of professional ethics like medical ethics. This assertion, of course, implicitly refers to ethical reasoning, but there is much more to the ethical life and the practice of ethics—especially professional ethics—than reasoning. It is no surprise that teachers of practical ethics, myself included, often focus on reasoning to the exclusion of other aspects of the ethical life. Especially for those with a philosophical (...)
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  42. Set Theory and its Philosophy: A Critical Introduction.Michael D. Potter - 2004 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Michael Potter presents a comprehensive new philosophical introduction to set theory. Anyone wishing to work on the logical foundations of mathematics must understand set theory, which lies at its heart. Potter offers a thorough account of cardinal and ordinal arithmetic, and the various axiom candidates. He discusses in detail the project of set-theoretic reduction, which aims to interpret the rest of mathematics in terms of set theory. The key question here is how to deal with the paradoxes that bedevil (...)
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  43.  43
    Aspects of Scientific Explanation.Michael D. Resnik - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (1):139-140.
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  44.  30
    Science without Numbers.Michael D. Resnik - 1983 - Noûs 17 (3):514-519.
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  45.  8
    Proxy Consent by a Physician When a Patient’s Capacity Is Equivocal: Respecting a Patient’s Autonomy by Overriding the Patient’s Ostensible Treatment Preferences.Michael D. April, Carolyn April & Abraham Graber - 2018 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 29 (4):266-275.
    Respect for patients’ autonomy has taken a central place in the practice of medicine. Received wisdom holds that respect for autonomy allows overriding a patient’s treatment preferences only if the patient has been found to lack capacity. This understanding of respect for autonomy requires a dichotomous approach to assessing capacity, whereby a patient must be found either to have full capacity to make some particular treatment decision or must be found to lack capacity to make that decision. However, clinical reality (...)
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  46.  51
    The Reverse Discrimination Controversy: A Moral and Legal Analysis.Justice and Reverse Discrimination.Michael D. Bayles, Robert K. Fullinwider & Alan H. Goldman - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):455.
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  47.  33
    Reasoning and Arguing, Dialectically and Dialogically, Among Individual and Multiple Participants.Michael D. Baumtrog - 2018 - Argumentation 32 (1):77-98.
    Within three of the most well-known contemporary approaches to argumentation, the notions of solo argumentation and arguing with one’s self are given little attention and are typically argued to be able to be subsumed within the dialectical aspects of the approach being propounded. Challenging these claims, this paper has two main aims. The first is to argue that while dialogical argumentation may be most common, there exists individual dialectical argumentation, which is not so easily subsumed within these theories. Second, in (...)
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  48. The Participating Citizen.Michael D. Barber - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (2):229-232.
     
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  49.  74
    Michael Aeschliman on Scientism vs. Sapentia.Michael D. Aeschliman - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):248-257.
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  50. Second-order Logic Still Wild.Michael D. Resnik - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):75-87.
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