Results for 'Michael A. Kisley'

999 found
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  1.  37
    Is sensory gating a form of cognitive coordination?Michael A. Kisley & Deana B. Davalos - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):94-95.
    Neurophysiological investigations of the past two decades have consistently demonstrated a deficit in sensory gating associated with schizophrenia. Phillips & Silverstein interpret this impairment as being consistent with cognitive coordination dysfunction. However, the physiological mechanisms that underlie sensory gating have not been shown to involve gamma-band oscillations or NMDA-receptors, both of which are critical neural elements in the cognitive coordination model.
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  2.  5
    Effects of emotion, emotional tolerance, and emotional processing on reasoning.Amanda M. Harvey & Michael A. Kisley - 2023 - Cognition and Emotion 37 (6):1090-1104.
    Emotion plays a significant role in our reasoning even without awareness, perhaps especially for individuals who have difficulties tolerating strong, negative emotions. Opportunity for reflection may help such individuals decide when emotions should influence reasoning. Two studies attempted to clarify the relationships among reasoning, emotions, and emotion tolerance (measured with the Affect Intolerance Scale). The first examined the effect of affect intolerance on a reasoning task. Participants were asked to determine whether conclusions logically followed from both emotional and neutral if–then (...)
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  3.  22
    How to win an argument.Michael A. Gilbert - 1978 - New York: McGraw-Hill.
    It's not always the person who is right who wins the arguments, more often it's the person who argues best. Gilbert's practical, clever guide--which also serves as a text for his popular seminars on the art of arguing--shows readers how to hone their polemical skills, and how to counter the verbal weapons that may be in an opponent's arsenal.
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  4. A theory of freedom and responsibility.Michael A. Smith - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and practical reason. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 293-317.
  5.  40
    Following Marx: method, critique and crisis.Michael A. Lebowitz - 2009 - Boston: Brill.
    Combining Marx's focus upon the totality (and its appearance as capitals in competition) with specific applications in political economy, 'Following Marx' ...
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  6.  5
    Interview with Kevin Harris.Michael A. Peters - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (3):209-216.
    This interview took place through email during October-November, 2019. Michael: It’s a real pleasure to engage you in conversation. You were a foundation member of PESA and someone who in the pre-I...
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  7.  26
    No Fault Compensation in Medicine.Michael A. Jones - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):162-163.
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  8.  2
    Finite perfection: reflections on virtue.Michael A. Weinstein - 1985 - Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
  9. Spinoza on beings of reason [entia rationis] and the analogical imagination.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2019 - In Charles Ramond & Jack Stetter (eds.), Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy.
  10. Can You Hear Me Now? Sensitive Comparisons of Human and Machine Perception.Michael A. Lepori & Chaz Firestone - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (10):e13191.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 10, October 2022.
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  11.  6
    Multi-Modal 2020.Michael A. Gilbert - 2022 - Informal Logic 44 (1):487-506.
    My essay, “Multi-modal argumentation” was published in the journal, _Philosophy of the Social Sciences,_ in 1994. This information appeared again in my book, _Coalescent argumentation_ in 1997. In the ensuing twenty years, there have been many changes in argumentation theory, and I would like to take this opportunity to examine my now middle-aged theory in light of the developments in our discipline. I will begin by relating how a once keen intended lawyer and then formal logician ended up in argumentation (...)
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  12. Baruch Spinoza.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2009 - In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Routledge. pp. 3--141.
     
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  13. What is a theory of meaning?Michael A. E. Dummett - 1975 - In Samuel Guttenplan (ed.), Mind and Language. Oxford University Press.
  14.  26
    Quantum Computation and Quantum Information.Michael A. Nielsen & Isaac L. Chuang - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    First-ever comprehensive introduction to the major new subject of quantum computing and quantum information.
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  15.  35
    Philosophy of education in a new key: A collective project of the PESA executive.Michael A. Peters, Sonja Arndt, Marek Tesar, Liz Jackson, Ruyu Hung, Carl Mika, Janis T. Ozolins, Christoph Teschers, Janet Orchard, Rachel Buchanan, Andrew Madjar, Rene Novak, Tina Besley, Sean Sturm, Peter Roberts & Andrew Gibbons - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1061-1082.
    Michael Peters, Sonja Arndt & Marek TesarThis is a collective writing experiment of PESA members, including its Executive Committee, asking questions of the Philosophy of Education in a New Key. Co...
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  16. Human Needs: Overview.Michael A. Dover - 2023 - Oxford//Nasw Encyclopedia of Social Work Https://Doi.Org/10.1093/Acrefore/9780199975839.013.554.
    Human need and related concepts such as basic needs have long been part of the implicit conceptual foundation for social work theory, practice, and research. However, while the published literature in social work has long stressed social justice, and has incorporated discussion of human rights, human need has long been both a neglected and contested concept. In recent years, the explicit use of human needs theory has begun to have a significant influence on the literature in social work.
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  17. Towards a philosophy of academic publishing.Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić, Ruth Irwin, Kirsten Locke, Nesta Devine, Richard Heraud, Andrew Gibbons, Tina Besley, Jayne White, Daniella Forster, Liz Jackson, Elizabeth Grierson, Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Marek Tesar, Susanne Brighouse, Sonja Arndt, George Lazaroiu, Ramona Mihaila, Catherine Legg & Leon Benade - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (14):1401-1425.
    This article is concerned with developing a philosophical approach to a number of significant changes to academic publishing, and specifically the global journal knowledge system wrought by a range of new digital technologies that herald the third age of the journal as an electronic, interactive and mixed-media form of scientific communication. The paper emerges from an Editors' Collective, a small New Zealand-based organisation comprised of editors and reviewers of academic journals mostly in the fields of education and philosophy. The paper (...)
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  18. Consciousness cannot be separated from function.Michael A. Cohen & Daniel C. Dennett - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (8):358--364.
    Here, we argue that any neurobiological theory based on an experience/function division cannot be empirically confirmed or falsified and is thus outside the scope of science. A ‘perfect experiment’ illustrates this point, highlighting the unbreachable boundaries of the scientific study of consciousness. We describe a more nuanced notion of cognitive access that captures personal experience without positing the existence of inaccessible conscious states. Finally, we discuss the criteria necessary for forming and testing a falsifiable theory of consciousness.
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  19. Epistemology and the Psychology of Human Judgment.Michael A. Bishop & J. D. Trout - 2004 - New York: OUP USA. Edited by J. D. Trout.
    Bishop and Trout here present a unique and provocative new approach to epistemology. Their approach aims to liberate epistemology from the scholastic debates of standard analytic epistemology, and treat it as a branch of the philosophy of science. The approach is novel in its use of cost-benefit analysis to guide people facing real reasoning problems and in its framework for resolving normative disputes in psychology. Based on empirical data, Bishop and Trout show how people can improve their reasoning by relying (...)
  20.  88
    The Construction of Reality.Michael A. Arbib & Mary B. Hesse - 1986 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Mary B. Hesse.
    In this book, Michael Arbib, a researcher in artificial intelligence and brain theory, joins forces with Mary Hesse, a philosopher of science, to present an integrated account of how humans 'construct' reality through interaction with the social and physical world around them. The book is a major expansion of the Gifford Lectures delivered by the authors at the University of Edinburgh in the autumn of 1983. The authors reconcile a theory of the individual's construction of reality as a network (...)
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  21. Reimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19.Michael A. Peters, Fazal Rizvi, Gary McCulloch, Paul Gibbs, Radhika Gorur, Moon Hong, Yoonjung Hwang, Lew Zipin, Marie Brennan, Susan Robertson, John Quay, Justin Malbon, Danilo Taglietti, Ronald Barnett, Wang Chengbing, Peter McLaren, Rima Apple, Marianna Papastephanou, Nick Burbules, Liz Jackson, Pankaj Jalote, Mary Kalantzis, Bill Cope, Aslam Fataar, James Conroy, Greg Misiaszek, Gert Biesta, Petar Jandrić, Suzanne S. Choo, Michael Apple, Lynda Stone, Rob Tierney, Marek Tesar, Tina Besley & Lauren Misiaszek - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-44.
    Michael A. Petersa and Fazal Rizvib aBeijing Normal University, Beijing, PR China; bMelbourne University, Melbourne, Australia Our minds are still racing back and forth, longing for a return to ‘no...
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  22. AI and the future of humanity: ChatGPT-4, philosophy and education – Critical responses.Michael A. Peters, Liz Jackson, Marianna Papastephanou, Petar Jandrić, George Lazaroiu, Colin W. Evers, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Daniel Araya, Marek Tesar, Carl Mika, Lei Chen, Chengbing Wang, Sean Sturm, Sharon Rider & Steve Fuller - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory.
    Michael A PetersBeijing Normal UniversityChatGPT is an AI chatbot released by OpenAI on November 30, 2022 and a ‘stable release’ on February 13, 2023. It belongs to OpenAI’s GPT-3 family (generativ...
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  23.  13
    Named or nameless: University ethics, confidentiality and sexual harassment.Michael A. Peters, Liz Jackson & Tina Besley - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (14):2422-2433.
    This paper focusses on our concerns about revelations about sexual harassment in universities and the inadequate responses whereby some universities seem more concerned about their own reputations than the care and protection of their students. Seldom do cases go to criminal court, instead they mostly fall within employment relations policies where the use of non-disclosure agreements are double edged, such that some perpetrators remain nameless even if the person offended against wants details made public. Of course if the staff member (...)
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  24. From monkey-like action recognition to human language: An evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics.Michael A. Arbib - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):105-124.
    The article analyzes the neural and functional grounding of language skills as well as their emergence in hominid evolution, hypothesizing stages leading from abilities known to exist in monkeys and apes and presumed to exist in our hominid ancestors right through to modern spoken and signed languages. The starting point is the observation that both premotor area F5 in monkeys and Broca's area in humans contain a “mirror system” active for both execution and observation of manual actions, and that F5 (...)
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  25.  32
    After postmodernism in educational theory? A collective writing experiment and thought survey.Michael A. Peters, Marek Tesar & Liz Jackson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1299-1307.
  26. What is the Bandwidth of Perceptual Experience?Michael A. Cohen, Daniel C. Dennett & Nancy Kanwisher - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (5):324-335.
    Although our subjective impression is of a richly detailed visual world, numerous empirical results suggest that the amount of visual information observers can perceive and remember at any given moment is limited. How can our subjective impressions be reconciled with these objective observations? Here, we answer this question by arguing that, although we see more than the handful of objects, claimed by prominent models of visual attention and working memory, we still see far less than we think we do. Taken (...)
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  27. Coalescent argumentation.Michael A. Gilbert - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (5):837-852.
    Coalescent argumentation is a normative ideal that involves the joining together of two disparate claims through recognition and exploration of opposing positions. By uncovering the crucial connection between a claim and the attitudes, beliefs, feelings, values and needs to which it is connected dispute partners are able to identify points of agreement and disagreement. These points can then be utilized to effect coalescence, a joining or merging of divergent positions, by forming the basis for a mutual investigation of non-conflictual options (...)
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  28.  37
    Neurolinguistics must be computational.Michael A. Arbib & David Caplan - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):449-460.
  29.  1
    Diagnostic Prediction and Prognosis.J. D. Trout & Michael A. Bishop - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard Gipps, George Graham, John Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy and psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Psychiatric diagnosis and prognosis is fraught with important philosophical and conceptual problems. This chapter focuses on some epistemological issues and moral issues that arise in contemporary psychiatric practice. It examines various clinical and actuarial techniques for psychiatric diagnosis, ordered very loosely in terms of how "structured" or "automated" they are. The chapter makes the case for assessing psychiatric treatments with controlled experiments, raises several epistemological dangers that arise from relying on uncontrolled investigations, and considers some of the unique methodological and (...)
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  30.  10
    Recognizing the past in the present: new studies on medicine before, during, and after the Holocaust.Sabine Hildebrandt, Miriam Offer & Michael A. Grodin (eds.) - 2021 - New York: Berghahn Books.
    Following decades of silence about the involvement of doctors, medical researchers and other health professionals in the Holocaust and other National Socialist (Nazi) crimes, scholars in recent years have produced a growing body of research that reveals the pervasive extent of that complicity. This interdisciplinary collection of studies presents documentation of the critical role medicine played in realizing the policies of Hitler's regime. It traces the history of Nazi medicine from its roots in the racial theories of the 1920s, through (...)
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  31.  59
    The Good Life: Unifying the Philosophy and Psychology of Well-Being.Michael A. Bishop - 2014 - New York, US: OUP USA.
    Science and philosophy study well-being with different but complementary methods. Marry these methods and a new picture emerges: To have well-being is to be "stuck" in a positive cycle of emotions, attitudes, traits and success. This book unites the scientific and philosophical worldviews into a powerful new theory of well-being.
  32.  22
    The China-threat discourse, trade, and the future of Asia. A Symposium.Michael A. Peters, Alexander J. Means, David P. Ericson, Shivali Tukdeo, Joff P. N. Bradley, Liz Jackson, Guanglun Michael Mu, Timothy W. Luke & Greg William Misiaszek - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (10):1531-1549.
  33.  78
    The attentional requirements of consciousness.Michael A. Cohen, Patrick Cavanagh, Marvin M. Chun & Ken Nakayama - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (8):411-417.
  34. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies.Michaël A. S. Acquadro, Marco Congedo & Dirk De Riddeer - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  35.  74
    Education in a post-truth world.Michael A. Peters - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (6).
  36.  21
    A viral theory of post-truth.Michael A. Peters, Peter McLaren & Petar Jandrić - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (6):698-706.
    There is an ecology of bad ideas, just as there is an ecology of weeds, and it is characteristic of the system that basic error propagates itself.–Gregory Bateson, Steps Towards an Ecology of Mind...
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  37.  15
    Post-marxism, humanism and (post)structuralism: Educational philosophy and theory.Michael A. Peters, David Neilson & Liz Jackson - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (14):2331-2340.
    Western Marxism, since its Western deviation and theoretical development in the 1920s, developed in diverse ways that has reflected the broader philosophical environment. First, a theory of conscio...
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  38. Humanism in Business – Towards a Paradigm Shift?Michael A. Pirson & Paul R. Lawrence - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):553-565.
    Management theory and practice are facing unprecedented challenges. The lack of sustainability, the increasing inequity, and the continuous decline in societal trust pose a threat to ‘business as usual’. Capitalism is at a crossroad and scholars, practitioners, and policy makers are called to rethink business strategy in light of major external changes. In the following, we review an alternative view of human beings that is based on a renewed Darwinian theory developed by Lawrence and Nohria. We label this alternative view (...)
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  39.  32
    Viral modernity? Epidemics, infodemics, and the ‘bioinformational’ paradigm.Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić & Peter McLaren - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (6):675-697.
    Viral modernity is a concept based upon the nature of viruses, the ancient and critical role they play in evolution and culture, and the basic application to understanding the role of information and forms of bioinformation in the social world. The concept draws a close association between viral biology on the one hand, and information science on the other – it is an illustration and prime example of bioinformationalism that brings together two of the most powerful forces that now drive (...)
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  40.  16
    Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens.Michael A. Rinella - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon. Accessible yet erudite, Pharmakon is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the place of intoxicants in ancient thought yet written.
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  41.  53
    Catholic social teaching and the employment relationship: A model for managing human resources in accordance with Vatican doctrine.Michael A. Zigarelli - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (1):75-82.
    Using relevant encyclicals issued over the last 100 years, the author extracts those principles that constitute the underpinnings of Catholic Social Teaching about the employment relationship and contemplates implications of their incorporation into human resource policy. Respect for worker dignity, for his or her family's economic security, and for the common good of society clearly emerge as the primary guidelines for responsible human resource management. Dovetailing these three Church mandates with the economic objectives of the firm could, in essence, alter (...)
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  42. Why the generality problem is everybody’s problem.Michael A. Bishop - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 151 (2):285 - 298.
    The generality problem is widely considered to be a devastating objection to reliabilist theories of justification. My goal in this paper is to argue that a version of the generality problem applies to all plausible theories of justification. Assume that any plausible theory must allow for the possibility of reflective justification—S's belief, B, is justified on the basis of S's knowledge that she arrived at B as a result of a highly (but not perfectly) reliable way of reasoning, R. The (...)
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  43.  96
    Learning From the Body About the Mind.Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley & Guy Van Orden - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):21-34.
    In some areas of cognitive science we are confronted with ultrafast cognition, exquisite context sensitivity, and scale-free variation in measured cognitive activities. To move forward, we suggest a need to embrace this complexity, equipping cognitive science with tools and concepts used in the study of complex dynamical systems. The science of movement coordination has benefited already from this change, successfully circumventing analogous paradoxes by treating human activities as phenomena of self-organization. Therein, action and cognition are seen to be emergent in (...)
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  44.  7
    Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens.Michael A. Rinella - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon. Accessible yet erudite, Pharmakon is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the place of intoxicants in ancient thought yet written.
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  45.  35
    Education in and for the Belt and Road Initiative:: The Pedagogy of Collective Writing.Michael A. Peters, Ogunniran Moses Oladele, Benjamin Green, Artem Samilo, Hanfei Lv, Laimeche Amina, Yaqian Wang, Mou Chunxiao, Jasmin Omary Chunga, Xu Rulin, Tatiana Ianina, Stephanie Hollings, Magdoline Farid Barsoum Yousef, Petar Jandrić, Sean Sturm, Jian Li, Eryong Xue, Liz Jackson & Marek Tesar - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (10):1040-1063.
    This paper is an experiment in collective writing conducted in Autumn 2019 at the Faculty of Education at Beijing Normal University. The experiment involves 12 international masters' students readi...
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  46.  27
    Heidegger, Education, and Modernity.Michael A. Peters, Valerie Allen, Ares D. Axiotis, Michael Bonnett, David E. Cooper, Patrick Fitzsimons, Ilan Gur-Ze'ev, Padraig Hogan, F. Ruth Irwin, Bert Lambeir, Paul Smeyers, Paul Standish & Iain Thomson - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought.
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  47.  37
    Neural expectations: A possible evolutionary path from manual skills to language.Michael A. Arbib & Giacomo Rizzolatti - forthcoming - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal.
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  48. Why Thought Experiments are Not Arguments.Michael A. Bishop - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (4):534-541.
    Are thought experiments nothing but arguments? I argue that it is not possible to make sense of the historical trajectory of certain thought experiments if one takes them to be arguments. Einstein and Bohr disagreed about the outcome of the clock-in-the-box thought experiment, and so they reconstructed it using different arguments. This is to be expected whenever scientists disagree about a thought experiment's outcome. Since any such episode consists of two arguments but just one thought experiment, the thought experiment cannot (...)
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  49.  28
    The case for academic plagiarism education: A PESA Executive collective writing project.Michael A. Peters, Liz Jackson, Ruyu Hung, Carl Mika, Rachel Anne Buchanan, Marek Tesar, Tina Besley, Nina Hood, Sean Sturm, Bernadette Farrell, Andrew Madjar & Taylor Webb - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (9):1307-1323.
  50.  21
    The open peer review experiment in Educational Philosophy and Theory(EPAT).Michael A. Peters, Susanne Brighouse, Marek Tesar, Sean Sturm & Liz Jackson - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (2):133-140.
    Open Peer Review: Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT)Michael A. Peters, Beijing Normal University, PR ChinaIn 2016 EPAT started experimenting with open peer review for articles that were part...
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