14 found
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  1.  33
    Caring for Patients or Organs: New Therapies Raise New Dilemmas in the Emergency Department.Michael A. DeVita, Lisa S. Parker & Arjun Prabhu - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):6-16.
    Two potentially lifesaving protocols, emergency preservation and resuscitation and uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death, currently implemented in some U.S. emergency departments, have similar eligibility criteria and initial technical procedures, but critically different goals. Both follow unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and induce hypothermia to “buy time”: one in trauma patients suffering cardiac arrest, to enable surgical repair, and the other in patients who unexpectedly die in the ED, to enable organ donation. This article argues that to fulfill patient-focused fiduciary obligations (...)
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  2.  48
    Development of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Policy for the Care of Terminally Ill Patients Who May Become Organ Donors after Death Following the Removal of Life Support.Michael A. DeVita & James V. Snyder - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):131-143.
    In the mid 1980s it was apparent that the need for organ donors exceeded those willing to donate. Some University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) physicians initiated discussion of possible new organ donor categories including individuals pronounced dead by traditional cardiac criteria. However, they reached no conclusion and dropped the discussion. In the late 1980s and the early 1990s, four cases arose in which dying patients or their families requested organ donation following the elective removal of mechanical ventilation. Controversy surrounding (...)
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  3.  27
    When Is "Dead"?Stuart J. Youngner, Robert M. Arnold & Michael A. DeVita - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (6):14.
    One way of increasing the supply of vital organs without violating the dead donor rule is to declare death on cardiopulmonary criteria after withdrawing life support. The question then is how quickly death may be declared.
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  4.  24
    Original Articles.Stuart J. Youngner, Robert M. Arnold & Michael A. Devita - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (6):14-21.
    One way of increasing the supply of vital organs without violating the dead donor rule is to declare death on cardiopulmonary criteria after withdrawing life support. The question then is how quickly death may be declared.
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  5.  25
    History of Organ Donation by Patients with Cardiac Death.Michael A. DeVita, James V. Snyder & Ake Grenvik - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):113-129.
    When successful solid organ transplantation was initiated almost 40 years ago, its current success rate was not anticipated. But continuous efforts were undertaken to overcome the two major obstacles to success: injury caused by interrupting nutrient supply to the organ and rejection of the implanted organ by normal host defense mechanisms. Solutions have resulted from technologic medical advances, but also from using organs from different sources. Each potential solution has raised ethical concerns and has variably resulted in societal acclaim, censure, (...)
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  6.  25
    Procuring Organs from a Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver: A Case Report.Michael A. DeVita, Rade Vukmir, James V. Snyder & Cheryl Graziano - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (4):371-385.
    Organ transplantation is an accepted therapy for major organ failure, but it depends on the availability of viable organs. Most organs transplanted in the U.S. come from either "brain-dead" or living related donors. Recently organ procurement from patients pronounced dead using cardiopulmonary criteria, so-called "non-heart-beating cadaver donors" (NHBCDs), has been reconsidered. In May 1992, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) enacted a new, complicated policy for procuring organs from NHBCDs after the elective removal of life support. Seventeen months later (...)
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  7.  15
    Honestly, Do We Need a Policy on Truth?Michael A. DeVita - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):157-164.
    Physicians are taught that the foundation of the physician-patient relationship is trust, and trust is based in part on truthfulness. While drawing important Òlines in the sandÓ regarding whether and why to tell the truth, ethics codes promulgating honesty fail to provide clinicians with guidance regarding what is the truth, as well as when and how to disclose it. These issues may be at the core of why an adverse event is left undisclosed. Consistently being truthful in the setting of (...)
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  8.  74
    Oversight of research involving the dead.Mark R. Wicclair & Michael A. DeVita - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (2):143-164.
    : Research involving the dead, especially heart-beating cadavers, may facilitate the testing of potentially revolutionary and life-saving medical treatments. However, to ensure that such research is conducted ethically, it is essential to: (1) identify appropriate standards for this research and (2) assign institutional responsibility and a mechanism for oversight. Protocols for research involving the dead should be reviewed by a special committee and assessed according to nine standards intended to ensure scientific merit, to protect deceased patients and their families, and (...)
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  9.  26
    The Ethics of Medical Mistakes: Historical, Legal, and Institutional Perspectives.Michael A. DeVita & Mark P. Aulisio - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):115-116.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11.2 (2001) 115-116 [Access article in PDF] The Ethics of Medical Mistakes: Historical, Legal, and Institutional Perspectives Introduction In late 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its report on medical errors, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. The report estimated almost 50,000 deaths per year nationally due to medical mistakes, making it a leading cause of death. IOM speculated that (...)
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  10.  21
    Decisions by Conscious Persons about Controlled NHBD after Death: Eyes Wide Open.Michael A. DeVita & Thomas May - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (1):85-89.
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  11.  17
    Non-Heart-Beating Organ Donation: A Reply to Campbell and Weber.Michael A. DeVita, Rade Vukmir, James V. Snyder & Cheryl Graziano - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (1):43-49.
    In the preceding commentary, Campbell and Weber raise two valid and important issues concerning non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBOD). First, because the procedure links withdrawal of life support and the potential for subsequent organ donation, the desire for organs may create a situation in which care of the dying individual has relatively less importance and the dying may receive suboptimal care. Second, even if concerns about care of the dying were dealt with adequately, there will not be enough non-heart-beating donors to (...)
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  12.  40
    Committee for Oversight of Research Involving the Dead : Insights from the First Year.Laurel L. Yasko, Mark Wicclair & Michael A. Devita - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (4):327-337.
  13. Ethical issues in non-heartbeating cadaver donors.Shelly Ozark & Michael A. Devita - 2001 - Advances in Bioethics 7:167-194.
     
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  14.  33
    EPR and uDCDD: A Response to Commentaries.Arjun Prabhu, Lisa S. Parker & Michael A. DeVita - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):1-3.
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