Results for 'Melissa Sweet'

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  1.  33
    Widening the debate about conflict of interest: addressing relationships between journalists and the pharmaceutical industry.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Melissa Sweet, Christopher Jordens, Catriona Bonfiglioli & Rowena Forsyth - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):492-495.
    The phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World newspaper in Britain has prompted international debate about media practices and regulation. It is timely to broaden the discussion about journalistic ethics and conduct to include consideration of the impact of media practices upon the population's health. Many commercial organisations cultivate relationships with journalists and news organisations with the aim of influencing the content of health-related news and information communicated through the media. Given the significant influence (...)
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  2. Kant's Argument for the Apperception Principle.Melissa McBay Merritt - 2011 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):59-84.
    Abstract: My aim is to reconstruct Kant's argument for the principle of the synthetic unity of apperception. I reconstruct Kant's argument in stages, first showing why thinking should be conceived as an activity of synthesis (as opposed to attention), and then showing why the unity or coherence of a subject's representations should depend upon an a priori synthesis. The guiding thread of my account is Kant's conception of enlightenment: as I suggest, the philosophy of mind advanced in the Deduction belongs (...)
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  3.  38
    Living ethically, acting politically.Melissa A. Orlie - 1997 - Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
    Political scientist Melissa Orlie asks what it means to live freely and responsibly when advantages are distributed disproportionately according to race, gender ...
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  4.  23
    Kant on Free Speech: Criticism, Enlightenment, and the Exercise of Judgement in the Public Sphere.Kristi Sweet - 2024 - Kantian Review 29 (1):61-80.
    In this article, I offer a novel and in-depth account of how, for Kant, free speech is the mechanism that moves a society closer to justice. I argue that the criticism of the legislator preserved by free speech must also be the result of collective agreement. I further argue that structural features of judgements of taste and the sensus communis give guidance for how we should communicate publicly to succeed at the aims Kant has laid out, as judgements of taste, (...)
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  5.  10
    Konkurrierende Grenzen: Text, Bild und Raumvorstellung in De limitibus constituendis des Hyginus Gromaticus.Melissa Thorson Hause - 1997 - In Markus Bauer (ed.), Die Grenze: Begriff und Inszenierung. Oldenbourg Verlag. pp. 279-300.
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  6. Art after the Untreatable: Psychoanalysis, Sexual Violence, and the Ethics of Looking in Michaela Coel’s I May Destroy You.Melissa A. Wright - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (3):53.
    This essay brings psychoanalytic theory on trauma together with film and television criticism on rape narrative in an analysis of Michael Coel’s 2020 series I May Destroy You. Beyond the limited carceral framework of the police procedural, which dislocates the act of violence from the survivor’s history and context, Coel’s polyvalent, looping narrative metabolizes rape television’s forms and genres in order to stage and restage both trauma and genre again and anew. Contesting common conceptions of vulnerability and susceptibility that prefigure (...)
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  7. The Sublime.Melissa Merritt - 2018 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This Element considers Kant's account of the sublime in the context of his predecessors both in the Anglophone and German rationalist traditions. Since Kant says with evident endorsement that 'we call sublime that which is absolutely great' and nothing in nature can in fact be absolutely great, Kant concludes that strictly speaking what is sublime can only be the human calling to perfect our rational capacity according to the standard of virtue that is thought through the moral law. The Element (...)
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  8. Murdoch and Kant.Melissa Merritt - 2022 - In Silvia Caprioglio Panizza & Mark Hopwood (eds.), The Murdochian Mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 253-265.
    It has been insufficiently remarked that Murdoch deems “Kant’s ethical theory” to be “one of the most beautiful and exciting things in the whole of philosophy” in her 1959 essay “The Sublime and the Good”. Murdoch specifically has in mind the connection between Kant’s ethics and his theory of the sublime, which runs via the moral feeling of respect (Achtung). The chapter examines Murdoch’s interest in Kant on this point as a way to tease out the range of issues that (...)
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  9. Feeling and Orientation in Action: A Reply to Alix Cohen.Melissa M. Merritt - 2021 - Kantian Review 51 (5):329-350.
    Alix Cohen argues that the function of feeling in Kantian psychology is to appraise and orient activity. Thus she sees feeling and agency as importantly connected by Kant’s lights. I endorse this broader claim, but argue that feeling, on her account, cannot do the work of orientation that she assigns to it.
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  10.  50
    Absolution of a Causal Decision Theorist.Melissa Fusco - forthcoming - Noûs.
    I respond to a dilemma for Causal Decision Theory (CDT) under determinism, posed in Adam Elga's paper “Confessions of a Causal Decision Theorist”. The treatment I present highlights (i) the status of laws as predictors, and (ii) the consequences of decision dependence, which arises natively out of Jeffrey Conditioning and CDT's characteristic equation.My argument leverages decision dependence to work around a key assumption of Elga's proof: to wit, that in the two problems he presents, the CDTer must employ subjunctive-suppositional (rather (...)
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  11. Sexual Agency and Sexual Wrongs: A Dilemma for Consent Theory.Melissa Rees & Jonathan Ichikawa - 2024 - Philosophers' Imprint 24 (1):1-23.
    On a version of consent theory that tempts many, predatory sexual relations involving significant power imbalances (e.g. between professors and students, adults and teenagers, or employers and employees) are wrong because they violate consent-centric norms. In particular, the wronged party is said to have been incapable of consenting to the predation, and the sexual wrong is located in the encounter’s nonconsensuality. Although we agree that these are sexual wrongs, we resist the idea that they are always nonconsensual. We argue instead (...)
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  12. The Social Epistemology of Clinical Placebos.Melissa Rees - 2024 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 49 (3):233-245.
    Many extant theories of placebo focus on their causal structure wherein placebo effects are those that originate from select features of the therapy (e.g., client expectations or “incidental” features like size and shape). Although such accounts can distinguish placebos from standard medical treatments, they cannot distinguish placebos from everyday occurrences, for example, when positive feedback improves our performance on a task. Providing a social-epistemological account of a treatment context can rule out such occurrences, and furthermore reveal a new way to (...)
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  13.  55
    II—Plato on the Value of Knowledge in Ruling.Melissa Lane - 2018 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 92 (1):49-67.
    This paper transposes for evaluation in relation to the concerns of Plato’s Politicus a claim developed by Verity Harte in the context of his Philebus, that ‘external imposition of a practical aim would in some way corrupt paideutic [philosophical] knowledge’. I argue that the Politicus provides a case for which the Philebus distinction may not allow: ruling, or statecraft, as embodying a form of knowledge that can be answerable to practical norms in a way that does not necessarily subordinate or (...)
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  14.  4
    Responses to the Enlightenment: An Exchange on Foundations, Faith and Community.William Sweet & Hendrik Hart (eds.) - 2012 - New York, NY: Editions Rodopi.
    Since the time of the Enlightenment in Western Europe, discussions of faith and reason have often pitted the believer against the skeptic, the theist against the atheist, and the person of one faith against the person of no professed faith. But the relation of reason to faith has been a matter of debate among believers as well. There are those who hold that religious faith can be proven or supported by rational argument. Others say that to try to give reasons (...)
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  15.  15
    I am responsible.Melissa Higgins - 2014 - North Mankato, Minnesota: Capstone Press.
    Simple text and full color photographs describe how to be responsible, not a bully.
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  16.  5
    I am trustworthy.Melissa Higgins - 2014 - North Mankato, Minnesota: Capstone Press.
    Simple text and full color photographs describe how to be trustworthy, not a bully.
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  17.  23
    Politics as Architectonic Expertise? Against Taking the So-called ‘Architect’ (ἀρχιτέκτων) in Plato’s Statesman to Prefigure this Aristotelian View.Melissa Lane - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):449-467.
    This article rejects the claim made by other scholars that Plato in the Statesman, by employing the so-called ‘architect’ (ὁ ἀρχιτέκτων) in one of the early divisions leading to the definition of political expertise, prefigured and anticipated the architectonic conception of political expertise advanced by Aristotle. It argues for an alternative reading in which Plato in the Statesman, and in the only other of his works (Gorgias) in which the word appears, closely tracks the existing social role of the architektōn, (...)
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  18.  11
    Greek and Roman political ideas.Melissa Lane - 2014 - New York: Pelican, an imprint of Penguin Books.
    Where do our ideas about politics come from? What can we learn from the Greeks and Romans? How should we exercise power? Melissa Lane teaches politics at Princeton University, and previously taught political thought at the University of Cambridge, where she was a Fellow of King's College. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship in the field of classics, and the historian Richard Tuck called her book Eco-Republic 'a virtuoso performance by one of our best scholars of ancient philosophy.'.
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  19. Differences that matter.Melissa Wright - 2006 - In Noel Castree & Derek Gregory (eds.), David Harvey: a critical reader. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 80--101.
     
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  20. Sublimity and Joy: Kant on the Aesthetic Constitution of Virtue.Melissa Merritt - 2017 - In Matthew Altman (ed.), The Palgrave Kant Handbook. London: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 447-467.
    This chapter argues that Kant’s aesthetic theory of the sublime has particular relevance for his ethics of virtue. Kant contends that our readiness to revel in natural sublimity depends upon a background commitment to moral ends. Further lessons about the emotional register of the sublime allow us to understand how Kant can plausibly contend that the temperament of virtue is both sublime and joyous at the same time.
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  21. Mendelssohn and Kant on Human Progress: a Neo-Stoic Debate.Melissa Merritt - 2024 - In Luigi Filieri & Sophie Møller (eds.), Kant on Freedom and Nature: Essays in Honor of Paul Guyer. Routledge.
    The chapter replies to Paul Guyer’s (2020) account of the debate between Mendelssohn and Kant about whether humankind makes continual moral progress. Mendelssohn maintained that progress can only be the remit of individuals, and that humankind only “continually fluctuates within fixed limits”. Kant dubs Mendelssohn’s position “abderitism” and explicitly rejects it. But Guyer contends that Kant’s own theory of freedom commits him, malgré lui, to abderitism. Guyer’s risky interpretive position is not supported by examination of the relevant texts in their (...)
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  22.  7
    Philosophical Theory and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.William Sweet (ed.) - 2003 - University of Ottawa Press.
    Philosophical Theory and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights examines the relations and interrelations among theoretical and practical analyses of human rights. Edited by William Sweet, this volume draws on the works of philosophers, political theorists and those involved in the implementation of human rights. The essays, although diverse in method and approach, collectively argue that the language of rights and corresponding legal and political instruments have an important place in contemporary social political philosophy.
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  23.  18
    Chapter Twelve–A Time to Regender: The Transformation of Roman Time.Melissa Barden Dowling - 2004 - In Paul Harris & Michael Crawford (eds.), Time and uncertainty. Boston: Brill. pp. 175.
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  24. CARO: The Common Anatomy Reference Ontology.Haendel Melissa, A. Neuhaus, Fabian Osumi-Sutherland, David Mabee, M. Paula, L. V. MejinoJosé, Mungall Chris, J. Smith & Barry - 2008 - In Anatomy Ontologies for Bioinformatics: Principles and Practice. Springer. pp. 327--349.
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  25.  5
    Plato's Political Philosophy: The Republic, the Statesman, and the Laws.Melissa Lane - 2018 - In Sean D. Kirkland & Eric Sanday (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press. pp. 170–191.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Laws Conclusion Bibliography.
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  26. CARO: The Common Anatomy Reference Ontology.Melissa Haendel, Fabian Neuhaus, David Osumi-Sutherland, Paula M. Mabee, José L. V. Mejino Jr, Chris J. Mungall & Barry Smith - 2008 - In Anatomy Ontologies for Bioinformatics: Principles and Practice. Springer. pp. 327-349.
    The Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO) is being developed to facilitate interoperability between existing anatomy ontologies for different species, and will provide a template for building new anatomy ontologies. CARO has a structural axis of classification based on the top-level nodes of the Foundational Model of Anatomy. CARO will complement the developmental process sub-ontology of the GO Biological Process ontology, using it to ensure the coherent treatment of developmental stages, and to provide a common framework for the model organism communities (...)
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  27.  48
    Infants' understanding of false labeling events: the referential roles of words and the speakers who use them.Melissa A. Koenig & Catharine H. Echols - 2003 - Cognition 87 (3):179-208.
  28.  56
    The interplay of episodic and semantic memory in guiding repeated search in scenes.Melissa L.-H. Võ & Jeremy M. Wolfe - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):198-212.
  29.  23
    Production constraints on learning novel onset phonotactics.Melissa A. Redford - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):785-816.
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  30. Bounded Justice and the Limits of Health Equity.Melissa S. Creary - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (2):241-256.
    Programs, policies, and technologies — particularly those concerned with health equity — are often designed with justice envisioned as the end goal. These policies or interventions, however, frequently fail to recognize how the beneficiaries have historically embodied the cumulative effects of marginalization, which undermines the effectiveness of the intended justice. These well-meaning attempts at justice are bounded by greater socio-historical constraints. Bounded justice suggests that it is impossible to attend to fairness, entitlement, and equity when the basic social and physical (...)
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  31.  17
    Of Rule and Office: Plato's Ideas of the Political.Melissa Lane - 2023 - Princeton University Press.
    A new reading of Plato’s political thought Plato famously defends the rule of knowledge. Knowledge, for him, is of the good. But what is rule? In this study, Melissa Lane reveals how political office and rule were woven together in Greek vocabulary and practices that both connected and distinguished between rule in general and office as a constitutionally limited kind of rule in particular. In doing so, Lane shows Plato to have been deeply concerned with the roles and relationships (...)
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  32. Patient autonomy and withholding information.Melissa Rees - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (3):256-264.
    Disclosure in clinical practice is aimed at promoting patient autonomy, usually culminating in patient choice (e.g., to consent to an operation or not, or between different medications). In medical ethics, there is an implicit background assumption that knowing more about (X) automatically translates to greater, or more genuine, autonomy with respect to one's choices involving (X). I challenge this assumption by arguing that in rare cases, withholding information can promote a patient's autonomy (understood as the capacity for rational choice in (...)
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  33. Mendelssohn and Kant on Virtue as a Skill.Melissa McBay Merritt - 2020 - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Skill and Expertise. Routledge. pp. 88-99.
    The idea that virtue can be profitably conceived as a certain sort of skill has a long history. My aim is to examine a neglected episode in this history — one that focuses on the pivotal role that Moses Mendelssohn played in rehabilitating the skill model of virtue for the German rationalist tradition, and Immanuel Kant’s subsequent, yet significantly qualified, endorsement of the idea. Mendelssohn celebrates a certain automatism in the execution of skill, and takes this feature to be instrumental (...)
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  34.  59
    Kant on wonder as the motive to learn.Melissa Zinkin - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (6):921-934.
  35. Deontic Modality and the Semantics of Choice.Melissa Fusco - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    I propose a unified solution to two puzzles: Ross's puzzle and free choice permission. I begin with a pair of cases from the decision theory literature illustrating the phenomenon of act dependence, where what an agent ought to do depends on what she does. The notion of permissibility distilled from these cases forms the basis for my analysis of 'may' and 'ought'. This framework is then combined with a generalization of the classical semantics for disjunction — equivalent to Boolean disjunction (...)
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  36.  54
    Rawls and Habermas on religion in the public sphere.Melissa Yates - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (7):880-891.
    In recent essays, Jürgen Habermas endorses an account of political liberalism much like John Rawls'. Like Rawls, he argues that laws and public policies should be justified only in neutral terms, i.e. in terms of reasons that people holding conflicting world-views could accept. Habermas also, much like Rawls, distinguishes reasonable religious citizens, whose views should be included in public discourse, from unreasonable citizens in his expectation that religious citizens self-modernize. But in sharing these Rawlsian features, Habermas is vulnerable to some (...)
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  37.  22
    Interpersonal trust in children's testimonial learning.Melissa A. Koenig, Pearl Han Li & Benjamin McMyler - 2022 - Mind and Language 37 (5):955-974.
    Within the growing developmental literature on children's testimonial learning, the emphasis placed on children's evaluations of testimonial evidence has shielded from view some of the more collaborative dimensions of testimonial learning. Drawing on recent philosophical work on testimony and interpersonal trust, we argue for an alternative way of conceptualizing the social nature of testimonial learning. On this alternative, some testimonial learning is the result of a jointly collaborative epistemic activity, an activity that aims at the epistemic goal of true belief, (...)
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  38.  47
    Two-year-olds use artist intention to understand drawings.Melissa Allen Preissler & Paul Bloom - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):512-518.
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  39.  10
    The yoga of food: wellness from the inside out: healing the relationship with food & your body.Melissa Grabau - 2014 - Woodbury, Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications.
    For the millions of people who struggle with food and body issues, yoga and its practice of mindfulness can offer a surprisingly effective path to well-being. For Melissa Grabau, a psychotherapist who has battled her own eating disorders since she was a child, yoga contains the key ingredients to transforming our connection to food and to our bodies. The Yoga of Food invites you to explore contemplation prompts and meditations that will help you create a deeper appreciation of the (...)
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  40.  97
    The perverse effects of competition on scientists' work and relationships.Melissa S. Anderson, Emily A. Ronning, Raymond De Vries & Brian C. Martinson - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):437-461.
    Competition among scientists for funding, positions and prestige, among other things, is often seen as a salutary driving force in U.S. science. Its effects on scientists, their work and their relationships are seldom considered. Focus-group discussions with 51 mid- and early-career scientists, on which this study is based, reveal a dark side of competition in science. According to these scientists, competition contributes to strategic game-playing in science, a decline in free and open sharing of information and methods, sabotage of others’ (...)
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  41. States, Firms, and Their Legal Fictions: Attributing Identity and Responsibility to Artificial Entities.Melissa J. Durkee (ed.) - 2024 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume offers a new point of entry into questions about how the law conceives of states and firms. Because states and firms are fictitious constructs rather than products of evolutionary biology, the law dictates which acts should be attributed to each entity, and by which actors. Those legal decisions construct firms and states by attributing identity and consequences to them. As the volume shows, these legal decisions are often products of path dependence or conceptual metaphors like “personhood” that have (...)
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  42.  15
    Identity, space and politics: a critique of the poverty debates.Melissa R. Gilbert - 1997 - In John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.), Thresholds in feminist geography: difference, methodology, and representation. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 29--45.
  43.  24
    On the Separated Soul according to St. Thomas Aquinas.Melissa Eitenmiller - 2019 - Nova et Vetera 17 (1):57-91.
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  44. Kant on Reflection and Virtue.Melissa Merritt - 2018 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    There can be no doubt that Kant thought we should be reflective: we ought to care to make up our own minds about how things are and what is worth doing. Philosophical objections to the Kantian reflective ideal have centred on concerns about the excessive control that the reflective person is supposed to exert over her own mental life, and Kantians who feel the force of these objections have recently drawn attention to Kant’s conception of moral virtue as it is (...)
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  45. Systems Perspective of Amazon Mechanical Turk for Organizational Research: Review and Recommendations.Melissa G. Keith, Louis Tay & Peter D. Harms - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  46. Agential Free Choice.Melissa Fusco - 2020 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 50 (1):57-87.
    The Free Choice effect—whereby \\) seems to entail both \ and \—has traditionally been characterized as a phenomenon affecting the deontic modal ‘may’. This paper presents an extension of the semantic account of free choice defended by Fusco to the agentive modal ‘can’, the ‘can’ which, intuitively, describes an agent’s powers. On this account, free choice is a nonspecific de re phenomenon that—unlike typical cases—affects disjunction. I begin by sketching a model of inexact ability, which grounds a modal approach to (...)
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  47.  94
    Bad Taste, Aesthetic Akrasia, and Other "Guilty" Pleasures.Mélissa Thériault - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (3):58-71.
    To what extent does a person who prefers hip-hop rather than opera have legitimate reasons for doing so? Should we immediately classify such a judgment as incompetent because it runs counter to the verdicts of experts, including professional art critics? These questions are often associated with the problem of aesthetic akrasia, a concept taken from the vocabulary of ethics, which involves acting against one’s better judgment, that is, demonstrating irrationality by failing to react in what is, theoretically, the most appropriate (...)
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  48.  57
    Observations, Simulations, and Reasoning in Astrophysics.Melissa Jacquart - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):1209-1220.
    Astrophysics faces methodological challenges as a result of being a predominantly observation-based science without access to traditional experiments. In light of these challenges, astrophysicists frequently rely on computer simulations. Using collisional ring galaxies as a case study, I argue that computer simulations play three roles in reasoning in astrophysics: (1) hypothesis testing, (2) exploring possibility space, and (3) amplifying observations.
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  49.  73
    Voting the General Will.Melissa Schwartzberg - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (3):403-423.
    Scholars exploring the logic of Rousseau's voting rules have typically turned to the connection between Rousseau and the Marquis de Condorcet. Though Condorcet could not have had a direct influence on Rousseau's arguments about the choice of decision rules in "Social Contract," the possibility of a connection has encouraged the view that Rousseau's selection of voting rules was based on epistemic reasons. By turning to alternative sources of influence on Rousseau--the work of Hugo Grotius and particularly that of Samuel Pufendorf--a (...)
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  50.  32
    The role of inferences about referential intent in word learning: Evidence from autism.Melissa Allen Preissler & Susan Carey - 2005 - Cognition 97 (1):B13-B23.
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