Results for 'Meghan Elizabeth Griffith'

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  1. Does Free Will Remain a Mystery? A Response to Van Inwagen.Meghan Elizabeth Griffith - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 124 (3):261-269.
    In this paper, I argue against Peter van Inwagen’s claim (in “Free Will Remains a Mystery”), that agent-causal views of free will could do nothing to solve the problem of free will (specifically, the problem of chanciness). After explaining van Inwagen’s argument, I argue that he does not consider all possible manifestations of the agent-causal position. More importantly, I claim that, in any case, van Inwagen appears to have mischaracterized the problem in some crucial ways. Once we are clear on (...)
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  2.  48
    Freedom and Responsibility: An Agent -Causal View.Meghan Elizabeth Griffith - unknown
    In this dissertation, I argue that we ought to accept an agent-causal view of free and responsible action. First, I set the stage for this claim by highlighting our intuitions regarding moral responsibility and freedom, and by ruling out competing positions. I support Harry Frankfurt's claim that responsibility does not require the ability to do otherwise. I go beyond this claim, however, to argue that responsibility requires that one be the true originator of one's action, and that this requires a (...)
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  3.  22
    Affect Biases Memory of Location: Evidence for the Spatial Representation of Affect.L. Elizabeth Crawford, Skye M. Margolies, John T. Drake & Meghan E. Murphy - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1153-1169.
  4.  29
    Why Agent-Caused Actions Are Not Lucky.Meghan Griffith - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):43-56.
    Philosophers like to worry about luck. And well they should. Luck poses potential difficulties for knowledge, moral appraisal, and freedom. The primary target of this paper will be the last of these concerns . Recent arguments from luck have been levied against libertarian accounts of free will, including agent-causal ones. One general goal of this paper will be to demonstrate the truth of an often overlooked claim about responsibility-undermining luck. Part of this task will include illustrating what is genuinely worrisome (...)
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  5.  19
    Probabilistic Models, Learning Algorithms, and Response Variability: Sampling in Cognitive Development.Elizabeth Bonawitz, Stephanie Denison, Thomas L. Griffiths & Alison Gopnik - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (10):497-500.
  6.  77
    Free Will: The Basics.Meghan Griffith - 2013 - Routledge.
    The question of whether humans are free to make their own decisions has long been debated and it continues to be a controversial topic today. In _Free Will: The Basics_ readers are provided with a clear and accessible introduction to this central but challenging philosophical problem. The questions which are discussed include: Does free will exist? Or is it illusory? Can we be free even if everything is determined by a chain of causes? If our actions are not determined, does (...)
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  7. Freedom and Trying: Understanding Agent-Causal Exertions. [REVIEW]Meghan Griffith - 2007 - Acta Analytica 22 (1):16-28.
    In this paper, I argue that trying is the locus of freedom and moral responsibility. Thus, any plausible view of free and responsible action must accommodate and account for free tryings. I then consider a version of agent causation whereby the agent directly causes her tryings. On this view, the agent is afforded direct control over her efforts and there is no need to posit—as other agent-causal theorists do—an uncaused event. I discuss the potential advantages of this sort of view, (...)
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  8. Deconfounding Hypothesis Generation and Evaluation in Bayesian Models.Elizabeth Baraff Bonawitz & Thomas L. Griffiths - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  9.  32
    Rational Variability in Children’s Causal Inferences: The Sampling Hypothesis.Stephanie Denison, Elizabeth Bonawitz, Alison Gopnik & Thomas L. Griffiths - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):285-300.
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  10.  3
    Book Review Of: Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability. [REVIEW]Meghan Gosse - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1094-1095.
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  11.  53
    Based on a True Story: Narrative and the Value of Acting Freely.Meghan Griffith - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (1):19-34.
    In several essays, John Fischer motivates his guidance control view of moral responsibility by discussing the value of acting freely. What we value, he argues, is unhindered self-expression that derives its meaning from a narrative structure. In this paper, I claim that while Fischer may be correct that self-expression is the value of acting freely, it is less clear that the kind of self-expression that we value sits comfortably with determinism. The meaning of one’s narrative may include the accuracy of (...)
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  12. Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: II. Intervention Effectiveness Across Time.Calvin K. Lai, Allison L. Skinner, Erin Cooley, Sohad Murrar, Markus Brauer, Thierry Devos, Jimmy Calanchini, Y. Jenny Xiao, Christina Pedram, Christopher K. Marshburn, Stefanie Simon, John C. Blanchar, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, John Conway, Liz Redford, Rick A. Klein, Gina Roussos, Fabian M. H. Schellhaas, Mason Burns, Xiaoqing Hu, Meghan C. McLean, Jordan R. Axt, Shaki Asgari, Kathleen Schmidt, Rachel Rubinstein, Maddalena Marini, Sandro Rubichi, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin & Brian A. Nosek - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (8):1001-1016.
  13.  21
    Paul Russell, The Limits of Free Will.Meghan Griffith - 2020 - Ethics 130 (3):469-474.
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  14.  19
    Narrative Capacity and Moral Responsibility.Meghan Griffith - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (1):93-113.
    :My main aim in this essay is to argue that “narrative capacity” is a genuine feature of our mental lives and a skill that enables us to become full-fledged morally responsible agents. I approach the issue from the standpoint of reasons-responsiveness. Reasons-responsiveness theories center on the idea that moral responsibility requires sufficient sensitivity to reasons. I argue that our capacity to understand and tell stories has an important role to play in this sensitivity. Without such skill we would be cut (...)
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  15.  37
    Review of E. J. Lowe, Personal Agency: The Metaphysics of Mind and Action[REVIEW]Meghan Griffith - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  16.  14
    Review of Pedro Alexis Tabensky, Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation[REVIEW]Meghan Griffith - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (4).
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  17.  31
    Ethical Challenges Experienced by Clinical Research Nurses:: A Qualitative Study.Mary E. Larkin, Brian Beardslee, Enrico Cagliero, Catherine A. Griffith, Kerry Milaszewski, Marielle T. Mugford, Joanna M. Myerson, Wen Ni, Donna J. Perry, Sabune Winkler & Elizabeth R. Witte - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (1):172-184.
    Background:Clinical investigation is a growing field employing increasing numbers of nurses. This has created a new specialty practice defined by aspects unique to nursing in a clinical research context: the objectives, setting, and nature of the nurse–participant relationship. The clinical research nurse role may give rise to feelings of ethical conflict between aspects of protocol implementation and the duty of patient advocacy, a primary nursing responsibility. Little is known about whether research nurses experience unique ethical challenges distinct from those experienced (...)
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  18.  20
    Assent and Dissent: Ethical Considerations in Research With Toddlers.Hallie R. Brown, Elizabeth A. Harvey, Shayl F. Griffith, David H. Arnold & Richard P. Halgin - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (8):651-664.
    In accordance with ethical principles and standards, researchers conducting studies with children are expected to seek assent and respect their dissent from participation. Little attention has been given to assent and dissent in research with toddlers, who have limited cognitive and emotional capabilities. We discuss research with toddlers in the context of assent and dissent and propose guidelines to ensure that research with toddlers still adheres to ethical principles. These guidelines include designing engaging studies, monitoring refusal and distress, and partnering (...)
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  19.  28
    Routledge Companion to Free Will.Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.) - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    Questions concerning free will are intertwined with issues in almost every area of philosophy, from metaphysics to philosophy of mind to moral philosophy, and are also informed by work in different areas of science. Free will is also a perennial concern of serious thinkers in theology and in non-western traditions. Because free will can be approached from so many different perspectives and has implications for so many debates, a comprehensive survey needs to encompass an enormous range of approaches. This book (...)
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  20.  4
    Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith, & Neil Levy, , "The Routledge Companion to Free Will." Reviewed By.Filip Grgić - 2020 - Philosophy in Review 40 (1):41-42.
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  21.  16
    The Routledge Companion to Free Will, Edited by Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith, and Neil Levy: New York: Routledge, 2017, Pp. Xx + 707, £150. [REVIEW]Stephanie Rennick - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):626-627.
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  22.  66
    Kane’s Libertarian Theory and Luck: A Reply to Griffith.John Lemos - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):357-367.
    In a recent article, Meghan Griffith (American Philosophical Quarterly 47:43–56, 2010) argues that agent-causal libertarian theories are immune to the problem of luck but that event-causal theories succumb to this problem. In making her case against the event-causal theories, she focuses on Robert Kane’s event-causal theory. I provide a brief account of the central elements of Kane’s theory and I explain Griffith’s critique of it. I argue that Griffith’s criticisms fail. In doing so, I note some (...)
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  23.  34
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Kohut Jr, Nicholas C. Polos, Lois M. R. Louden, Cyril E. Griffith, Beverly Lindsay, Don T. Martin, M. M. Chambers, Joseph W. Newman, Harvey Neufeldt, Elizabeth Ihle, David C. Williams, James E. Christensen & J. Theodore Klein - 1978 - Educational Studies 9 (3):307-328.
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  24.  21
    Why We Disagree About Human Nature.Elizabeth Hannon & Tim Lewens (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Is human nature something that the natural and social sciences aim to describe, or is it a pernicious fiction? What role, if any, does ”human nature’ play in directing and informing scientific work? Can we talk about human nature without invoking---either implicitly or explicitly---a contrast with human culture? It might be tempting to think that the respectability of ”human nature’ is an issue that divides natural and social scientists along disciplinary boundaries, but the truth is more complex. The contributors to (...)
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  25. Social Construction and Grounding.Aaron M. Griffith - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (2):393-409.
    The aim of this paper is to bring recent work on metaphysical grounding to bear on the phenomenon of social construction. It is argued that grounding can be used to analyze social construction and that the grounding framework is helpful for articulating various claims and commitments of social constructionists, especially about social identities, e.g., gender and race. The paper also responds to a number of objections that have been leveled against the application of grounding to social construction from Elizabeth (...)
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  26.  1
    Character, Self, and Sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment.Thomas Ahnert & Susan Manning (eds.) - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Reid and Hume on the Possibility of Character--James A. Harris * Adam Smith's Rhetorical Art of Character--Stephen McKenna * The Moral Education of Mankind: Character and Religious Moderatism in the Sermons of Hugh Blair--Thomas Ahnert * The Not-So-Prodigal Son: James Boswell and the Scottish Enlightenment--Anthony La Vopa * Character, Sociability and Correspondence: Elizabeth Griffith and The Letters between Henry and Frances--Eve Tavor Bannet * Smellie's Dreams: Character and Consciousness in the Scottish Enlightenment--Phyllis Mack (...)
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  27.  18
    Arguing About Human Nature: Contemporary Debates.Stephen M. Downes & Edouard Machery (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    Arguing About Human Nature covers recent debates--arising from biology, philosophy, psychology, and physical anthropology--that together systematically examine what it means to be human. Thirty-five essays--several of them appearing here for the first time in print--were carefully selected to offer competing perspectives on 12 different topics related to human nature. The context and main threads of the debates are highlighted and explained by the editors in a short, clear introduction to each of the 12 topics. Authors include Louise Anthony, Patrick Bateson, (...)
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  28. Event-Causal Libertarianism, Functional Reduction, and the Disappearing Agent Argument.Christopher Evan Franklin - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (3):413-432.
    Event-causal libertarians maintain that an agent’s freely bringing about a choice is reducible to states and events involving him bringing about the choice. Agent-causal libertarians demur, arguing that free will requires that the agent be irreducibly causally involved. Derk Pereboom and Meghan Griffith have defended agent-causal libertarianism on this score, arguing that since on event-causal libertarianism an agent’s contribution to his choice is exhausted by the causal role of states and events involving him, and since these states and (...)
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  29. Metaphysics: The Key Concepts.Nikk Effingham, Helen Beebee & Philip Goff - 2010 - Routledge.
    _‘Informative, accessible, and fun to read— this is an excellent reference guide for undergraduates and anyone wanting an introduction to the fundamental issues of metaphysics. I know of no other resource like it.’– __Meghan Griffith, Davidson College, USA_ _'Marvellous! This book provides the very best place to start for students wanting to take the first step into understanding metaphysics.Undergraduates would do well to buy it and consult it regularly. The quality and clarity of the material are consistently high.' – (...)
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  30.  13
    A Companion to Cognitive Science.George Graham & William Bechtel (eds.) - 1998 - Blackwell.
    Part I: The Life of Cognitive Science:. William Bechtel, Adele Abrahamsen, and George Graham. Part II: Areas of Study in Cognitive Science:. 1. Analogy: Dedre Gentner. 2. Animal Cognition: Herbert L. Roitblat. 3. Attention: A.H.C. Van Der Heijden. 4. Brain Mapping: Jennifer Mundale. 5. Cognitive Anthropology: Charles W. Nuckolls. 6. Cognitive and Linguistic Development: Adele Abrahamsen. 7. Conceptual Change: Nancy J. Nersessian. 8. Conceptual Organization: Douglas Medin and Sandra R. Waxman. 9. Consciousness: Owen Flanagan. 10. Decision Making: J. Frank Yates (...)
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  31. I—Elizabeth Anderson: Expanding the Egalitarian Toolbox: Equality and Bureaucracy.Elizabeth Anderson - 2008 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):139-160.
    Many problems of inequality in developing countries resist treatment by formal egalitarian policies. To deal with these problems, we must shift from a distributive to a relational conception of equality, founded on opposition to social hierarchy. Yet the production of many goods requires the coordination of wills by means of commands. In these cases, egalitarians must seek to tame rather than abolish hierarchy. I argue that bureaucracy offers important constraints on command hierarchies that help promote the equality of workers in (...)
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  32.  20
    Philosophers Discuss Education.R. F. Holland - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (199):63 - 81.
    It has come to be expected that collections issued by the Royal Institute of Philosophy will contain work that has quality or is otherwise interesting. This volume runs true to form and presents plenty of both. It gives the proceedings of the conference arranged by the Institute at Exeter in 1973, consisting of five symposia together with Chairman's remarks of about eight pages or so for each symposium, and in three cases postscripts by the first speaker. The contributors and topics (...)
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  33.  45
    III. Basic Emotions, Complex Emotions, Machiavellian Emotions1: Paul E. Griffiths.Paul E. Griffiths - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:39-67.
    According to the distinguished philosopher Richard Wollheim, an emotion is an extended mental episode that originates when events in the world frustrate or satisfy a pre-existing desire. This leads the subject to form an attitude to the world which colours their future experience, leading them to attend to one aspect of things rather than another, and to view the things they attend to in one light rather than another. The idea that emotions arise from the satisfaction or frustration of desires—the (...)
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  34.  70
    ‘Saints and Heroes’: Elizabeth M. Pybus.Elizabeth M. Pybus - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (220):193-199.
    In his article ‘Saints and Heroes’, Urmson argues that traditional moral theories allow at most for a threefold classification of actions in terms of their worth, and that they are therefore unsatisfactory. Since the conclusion of his argument has led to the widespread use of the term ‘acts of supererogation’, and since I do not believe that such acts exist, I propose to argue that the actions with which he is concerned not only can, but should, be contained within the (...)
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  35.  48
    An Interview with Elizabeth Povinelli: Geontopower, Biopolitics and the Anthropocene.Elizabeth A. Povinelli, Mathew Coleman & Kathryn Yusoff - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):169-185.
    This article is an interview with Elizabeth Povinelli, by Mathew Coleman and Kathryn Yusoff. It addresses Povinelli’s approaches to ‘geontologies’ and ‘geontopower’, and the discussion encompasses an exploration of her ideas on biopolitics, her retheorization of power in the current conditions of late liberalism, and the situation of the inhuman within philosophical and anthropological economies. Povinelli describes a mode of power that she calls geontopower, which operates through the governance of Life and Nonlife. The interview is accompanied by a (...)
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  36.  41
    An Interview with Elizabeth Grosz: Geopower, Inhumanism and the Biopolitical.Elizabeth Grosz, Kathryn Yusoff & Nigel Clark - 2017 - Theory, Culture and Society 34 (2-3):129-146.
    This article is an interview with Elizabeth Grosz by Kathryn Yusoff and Nigel Clark. It primarily addresses Grosz’s approaches to ‘geopower’, and the discussion encompasses an exploration of her ideas on biopolitics, inhuman forces and material experimentation. Grosz describes geopower as a force that subtends the possibility of politics. The interview is accompanied by a brief contextualizing introduction examining the themes of geophilosophy and the inhumanities in Grosz’s work.
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  37.  44
    Elizabeth Anderson Interviewed by John White.Elizabeth Anderson & John White - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 53 (1):5-20.
  38.  34
    Elizabeth Anderson Interview for The Harvard Review of Philosophy.Elizabeth Anderson, Tadhg Larabee & Nicholas Brown - 2019 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 26:7-21.
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  39.  34
    Elizabeth F. Loftus & William H. Calvin , "Memory's Future,".Elizabeth Loftus - manuscript
    Psychology's fascination with memory and its imperfections dates back further than we can remember. The first careful experimental studies of memory were published in 1885 by German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus, and tens of thousands of memory studies have been conducted since. What has been learned, and what might the future of memory be?
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  40.  19
    Elizabeth Rohde: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Deutsche Demokratische Republik, 3, Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin, Antiken Sammlung, 1. Pp. 87; 53 Plates, 8 Plates of Profile Drawings, 25 Figures of Lost Vases. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1990. Paper , DM 245. - M. F. Vos: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, The Netherlands, 7, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden, 4. Pp. X + 99; 53 Plates. Leiden, New York, Copenhagen and Cologne: Brill, 1991. Paper , Fl. 320. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Moignard - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):475-475.
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  41.  18
    Leisure: Elizabeth Telfer.Elizabeth Telfer - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:151-164.
    Although the theme of these papers is ‘Contemporary Moral Problems’ my paper is partly about Aristotelian ideas. I had originally intended to apologize for this, but I find there is no need: many other contributors have found Aristotle to be timelessly relevant, as I myself have.
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  42.  31
    Elizabeth Rohde: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Deutsche Demokratische Republik, 3, Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin, Antiken Sammlung, 1. (Union Académique Internationale.) Pp. 87; 53 Plates, 8 Plates of Profile Drawings, 25 Figures of Lost Vases. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1990. Paper (with Portfolio of Plates), DM 245.M. F. Vos: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, The Netherlands, 7, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden, 4. (Union Académique Internationale.) Pp. X + 99; 53 Plates. Leiden, New York, Copenhagen and Cologne: Brill, 1991. Paper (with Portfolio of Plates), Fl. 320. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Moignard - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):475-.
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  43.  72
    The Democratic University: The Role of Justice in the Production of Knowledge*: ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON.Elizabeth S. Anderson - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):186-219.
    What is the proper role of politics in higher education? Many policies and reforms in the academy, from affirmative action and a multicultural curriculum to racial and sexual harassment codes and movements to change pedagogical styles, seek justice for oppressed groups in society. They understand justice to require a comprehensive equality of membership: individuals belonging to different groups should have equal access to educational opportunities; their interests and cultures should be taken equally seriously as worthy subjects of study, their persons (...)
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  44.  4
    Elizabeth Potter. Gender and Boyle’s Law of Gases. Xiii + 210 Pp., Illus., Figs., Index. Bloomington/Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2001. $39.95 ; $18.95. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Hedrick - 2003 - Isis 94 (3):526-527.
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  45.  40
    Intolerable Wrong and Punishment: Elizabeth H. Wolgast.Elizabeth H. Wolgast - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (232):161-174.
    A common justification for retributive views of punishment is the idea that injustice is intolerable and must be answered. For instance F. H. Bradley writes: Why … do I merit punishment? It is because I have been guilty. I have done ‘wrong’… Now the plain man may not know what he means by ‘wrong’, but he is sure that, whatever it is, it ‘ought’ not to exist, that it calls and cries for obliteration; that, if he can remove it, it (...)
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  46.  3
    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps: A Good Feminist Woman Doing Bad Theology?Elizabeth Stuart - 2001 - Feminist Theology 9 (26):70-82.
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  47.  19
    Hellenistic Civilisation. 3rd Edn. By W. W. Tarn and G. T. Griffith. Pp. Ix + 372. London: Arnold, 1952. 25s.P. M. Fraser, W. W. Tarn & G. T. Griffith - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:169-169.
  48.  12
    Time Biases: A Theory of Rational Planning and Personal Persistence.Meghan Sullivan - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Should you care less about your distant future? What about events in your life that have already happened? How should the passage of time affect your planning and assessment of your life? Most of us think it is irrational to ignore the future but harmless to dismiss the past. But this book argues that rationality requires temporal neutrality.
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  49. Questions, Answers, and Knowledge- Wh.Meghan Masto - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (3):395-413.
    Various authors have attempted to understand knowledge-wh—or knowledge ascriptions that include an interrogative complement. I present and explain some of the analyses offered so far and argue that each view faces some problems. I then present and explain a newanalysis of knowledge-wh that avoids these problems and that offers several other advantages. Finally I raise some problems for invariantism about knowledge-wh and I argue thatcontextualism about knowledge-wh fits nicely with a very natural understanding of the nature of questions.
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  50. Empathy and Its Role in Morality.Meghan Masto - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):74-96.
    In this paper, I will argue, contra Prinz, that empathy is a crucial component of our moral lives. In particular, I argue that empathy is sometimes epistemologically necessary for identifying the right action; that empathy is sometimes psychologically necessary for motivating the agent to perform the right action; and that empathy is sometimes necessary for the agent to be most morally praiseworthy for an action. I begin by explaining what I take empathy to be. I then discuss some alleged problems (...)
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