Results for 'Medicine Decision making'

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  1.  26
    Rational Decision Making in Medicine: Implications for Overuse and Underuse.Benjamin Djulbegovic, Shira Elqayam & William Dale - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (3):655-665.
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  2.  43
    Clinical Decision-Making and Secondary Findings in Systems Medicine.T. Fischer, K. B. Brothers, P. Erdmann & M. Langanke - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):32.
    BackgroundSystems medicine is the name for an assemblage of scientific strategies and practices that include bioinformatics approaches to human biology ; “big data” statistical analysis; and medical informatics tools. Whereas personalized and precision medicine involve similar analytical methods applied to genomic and medical record data, systems medicine draws on these as well as other sources of data. Given this distinction, the clinical translation of systems medicine poses a number of important ethical and epistemological challenges for researchers (...)
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  3.  52
    Substitute Decision Making in Medicine: Comparative Analysis of the Ethico-Legal Discourse in England and Germany. [REVIEW]Ralf J. Jox, Sabine Michalowski, Jorn Lorenz & Jan Schildmann - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):153-163.
    Health care decision making for patients without decisional capacity is ethically and legally challenging. Advance directives (living wills) have proved to be of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Therefore, academic attention should focus more on substitute decision making by the next of kin. In this article, we comparatively analyse the legal approaches to substitute medical decision making in England and Germany. Based on the current ethico-legal discourse in both countries, three aspects of substitute (...) making will be highlighted: (1) Should there be a legally predefined order of relatives who serve as health care proxies? (2) What should be the respective roles and decisional powers of patient-appointed versus court-appointed substitute decision-makers? (3) Which criteria should be determined by law to guide substitute decision-makers? (shrink)
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  4. Decision Making in Medicine: The Practice of its Ethics.Charles Gordon Scorer & Antony John Wing (eds.) - 1979 - E. Arnold.
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  5. Decision Making with Incomplete Information: Systemic and Nonsystemic Ways of Thinking in Psychology and Medicine.A. am Toomeln - 2005 - In Roger Bibace (ed.), Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger.
     
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  6.  12
    Decision Making with Incomplete Information: Systemic and Nonsystemic Ways of Thinking in Psychology and Medicine.Aaro Toomela - 2005 - In Roger Bibace (ed.), Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger. pp. 231--241.
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  7. Shared Decision-Making and Patient Autonomy.Lars Sandman & Christian Munthe - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):289-310.
    In patient-centred care, shared decision-making is advocated as the preferred form of medical decision-making. Shared decision-making is supported with reference to patient autonomy without abandoning the patient or giving up the possibility of influencing how the patient is benefited. It is, however, not transparent how shared decision-making is related to autonomy and, in effect, what support autonomy can give shared decision-making. In the article, different forms of shared decision-making (...)
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  8.  17
    Advance Directives, Preemptive Suicide and Emergency Medicine Decision Making.Richard L. Heinrich, Marshall T. Morgan & Steven J. Rottman - 2011 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (3):189-197.
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  9.  16
    Five Warrants for Medical Decision Making: Some Considerations and a Proposal to Better Integrate Evidence‐Based Medicine Into Everyday Practice. Commentary on Tonelli (2006), Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence‐Based Approaches.Massimo Porta - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):265-268.
  10. Shared Decision-Making, Gender and New Technologies.Kristin Zeiler - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):279-287.
    Much discussion of decision-making processes in medicine has been patient-centred. It has been assumed that there is, most often, one patient. Less attention has been given to shared decision-making processes where two or more patients are involved. This article aims to contribute to this special area. What conditions need to be met if decision-making can be said to be shared? What is a shared decision-making process and what is a shared autonomous (...)
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  11.  38
    Informed Consent, Shared Decision-Making, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine.Jeremy Sugarman - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):247-250.
    Complementary and alternative medicine is used by many in hopes of achieving important health-related goals. Survey data indicate that 42 percent of the U.S. population uses CAM, accounting for 629 million “office” visits a year and expenditures of 27 billion dollars. This high prevalence of use calls for a careful evaluation of CAM so as to ensure the well-being of those using its modalities. Such an evaluation would obviously include assessments of the safety and efficacy of particular approaches, the (...)
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  12.  28
    Informed Consent, Shared Decision-Making, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine.Jeremy Sugarman - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):247-250.
    Complementary and alternative medicine is used by many in hopes of achieving important health-related goals. Survey data indicate that 42 percent of the U.S. population uses CAM, accounting for 629 million “office” visits a year and expenditures of 27 billion dollars. This high prevalence of use calls for a careful evaluation of CAM so as to ensure the well-being of those using its modalities. Such an evaluation would obviously include assessments of the safety and efficacy of particular approaches, the (...)
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  13.  11
    Challenges in Shared Decision-Making in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology: Two Illustrative Cases of the Pursuit of Postoperative Alternative Medicine.Mandana Behbahani, Laura S. McGuire, Laura Burokas, Emily Obringer & Demetrios Nikas - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (1):49-52.
    In caring for pediatric patients, a multifaceted approach in decision-making is utilized. The role of the medical team in complementary and alternative medicine is controversial. In cases of conventional treatment refusal by parents in pursuit of complementary and alternative medicine, there must be balanced decision-making, autonomy, and the best interest of the child. This report highlights two illustrative cases of patients with brain tumor, whereby parents refused postoperative conventional therapy involving chemoradiotherapy, in pursuit of (...)
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  14.  13
    Regulating “Quack” Medicine and Decision-Making For Children Re-Visited.Bernadette Richards & Michaela E. Okninski - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):467-471.
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  15.  13
    Narrative Medicine and Decision-Making Capacity.Greg Mahr - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):503-507.
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  16.  33
    Non-Patient Decision-Making in Medicine: The Eclipse of Altruism.Margaret P. Battin - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (1):19-44.
    Despite its virtues, lay decision-making in medicine shares with professional decision-making a disturbing common feature, reflected both in formal policies prohibiting high-risk research and in informal policies favoring treatment decisions made when a crisis or change of status occurs, often late in a downhill course. By discouraging patient decision-making but requiring dedication to the patient's interests by those who make decisions on the patient's behalf, such practices tend to preclude altruistic choice on the (...)
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  17.  46
    Computer-Assisted Decision Making in Medicine.A. Feigenbaum Edward - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (2).
    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of five major paradigms of medical computer-assisted decision making (CADM): (1) clinical algorithms, (2) statistical analysis of collections of patient data, (3) mathematical models of physical processes, (4) decision analysis, and (5) symbolic reasoning or artificial intelligence (Al). No one technique is best for all applications, and there is recent promising work which combines two or more established techniques. We emphasize both the inherent power of symbolic reasoning and the promise (...)
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  18.  7
    Decision-Making Capacity: From Testing to Evaluation.Helena Hermann, Martin Feuz, Manuel Trachsel & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):253-259.
    Decision-making capacity is the gatekeeping element for a patient’s right to self-determination with regard to medical decisions. A DMC evaluation is not only conducted on descriptive grounds but is an inherently normative task including ethical reasoning. Therefore, it is dependent to a considerable extent on the values held by the clinicians involved in the DMC evaluation. Dealing with the question of how to reasonably support clinicians in arriving at a DMC judgment, a new tool is presented that fundamentally (...)
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  19.  20
    Surrogate Decision Making in the Internet Age.Jessica Berg - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):28-33.
    The computer revolution has had an enormous effect on all aspects of the practice of medicine, yet little thought has been given to the role of social media in identifying treatment choices for incompetent patients. We are currently living in the ?Internet age? and many people have integrated social media into all aspects of their lives. As use becomes more prevalent, and as users age, social media are more likely to be viewed as a source of information regarding medical (...)
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  20.  8
    A Novel Fuzzy Algorithm to Introduce New Variables in the Drug Supply Decision-Making Process in Medicine.Jose M. Gonzalez-Cava, José Antonio Reboso, José Luis Casteleiro-Roca, José Luis Calvo-Rolle & Juan Albino Méndez Pérez - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-15.
    One of the main challenges in medicine is to guarantee an appropriate drug supply according to the real needs of patients. Closed-loop strategies have been widely used to develop automatic solutions based on feedback variables. However, when the variable of interest cannot be directly measured or there is a lack of knowledge behind the process, it turns into a difficult issue to solve. In this research, a novel algorithm to approach this problem is presented. The main objective of this (...)
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  21.  15
    Computer-Assisted Decision Making in Medicine.J. C. Kunz, E. H. Shortliffe, B. G. Buchanan & E. A. Feigenbaum - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (2):135-160.
    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of five major paradigms of medical computer-assisted decision making (CADM): (1) clinical algorithms, (2) statistical analysis of collections of patient data, (3) mathematical models of physical processes, (4) decision analysis, and (5) symbolic reasoning or artificial intelligence (Al). No one technique is best for all applications, and there is recent promising work which combines two or more established techniques. We emphasize both the inherent power of symbolic reasoning and the promise (...)
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  22.  28
    Uncertainty and Objectivity in Clinical Decision Making: A Clinical Case in Emergency Medicine.Eivind Engebretsen, Kristin Heggen, Sietse Wieringa & Trisha Greenhalgh - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4):595-603.
    The evidence-based practice and evidence-based medicine movements have promoted standardization through guideline development methodologies based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of best available research. EBM has challenged clinicians to question their reliance on practical reasoning and clinical judgement. In this paper, we argue that the protagonists of EBM position their mission as reducing uncertainty through the use of standardized methods for knowledge evaluation and use. With this drive towards uniformity, standardization and control comes a suspicion towards intuition, creativity and (...)
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  23.  47
    Patient Decision Making Competence: Outlines of a Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW]Jos V. M. Welie & Sander P. K. Welie - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):127-138.
    In order to protect patients against medical paternalism, patients have been granted the right to respect of their autonomy. This right is operationalized first and foremost through the phenomenon of informed consent. If the patient withholds consent, medical treatment, including life-saving treatment, may not be provided. However, there is one proviso: The patient must be competent to realize his autonomy and reach a decision about his own care that reflects that autonomy. Since one of the most important patient rights (...)
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  24.  4
    Medical Decision Making: A Physician's Guide.Alan Schwartz - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Decision making is a key activity, perhaps the most important activity, in the practice of healthcare. Although physicians acquire a great deal of knowledge and specialised skills during their training and through their practice, it is in the exercise of clinical judgement and its application to individual patients that the outstanding physician is distinguished. This has become even more relevant as patients become increasingly welcomed as partners in a shared decision making process. This book translates the (...)
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  25.  31
    Treatment Decision Making for Incapacitated Patients: Is Development and Use of a Patient Preference Predictor Feasible?Annette Rid & David Wendler - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):130-152.
    It has recently been proposed to incorporate the use of a “Patient Preference Predictor” (PPP) into the process of making treatment decisions for incapacitated patients. A PPP would predict which treatment option a given incapacitated patient would most likely prefer, based on the individual’s characteristics and information on what treatment preferences are correlated with these characteristics. Including a PPP in the shared decision-making process between clinicians and surrogates has the potential to better realize important ethical goals for (...)
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  26. Artificial Intelligence and Patient-Centered Decision-Making.Jens Christian Bjerring & Jacob Busch - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (2):349-371.
    Advanced AI systems are rapidly making their way into medical research and practice, and, arguably, it is only a matter of time before they will surpass human practitioners in terms of accuracy, reliability, and knowledge. If this is true, practitioners will have a prima facie epistemic and professional obligation to align their medical verdicts with those of advanced AI systems. However, in light of their complexity, these AI systems will often function as black boxes: the details of their contents, (...)
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  27. Phronesis and Decision Making in Medicine: Practical Wisdom in Action.K. W. M. Fulford & Tim Thornton - forthcoming - Routledge.
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  28. Shared Decision-Making for Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Policy Goals, Metrics, and Challenges.Birju R. Rao, Faisal M. Merchant, David H. Howard, Daniel Matlock & Neal W. Dickert - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (4):622-629.
    Shared decision-making has become a new focus of health policy. Though its core elements are largely agreed upon, there is little consensus regarding which outcomes to prioritize for policy-mandated shared decision-making.
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  29.  69
    Decision Making in Health Care: Theory, Psychology, and Applications.Gretchen B. Chapman & Frank A. Sonnenberg (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Decision making is a crucial element in the field of medicine. The physician has to determine what is wrong with the patient and recommend treatment, while the patient has to decide whether or not to seek medical care, and go along with the treatment recommended by the physician. Health policy makers and health insurers have to decide what to promote, what to discourage, and what to pay for. Together, these decisions determine the quality of health care that (...)
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  30.  36
    Evidence‐Based Medicine and its Role in Ethical DecisionMaking.Pascal Borry, Paul Schotsmans & Kris Dierickx - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):306-311.
  31.  39
    Medical Decision Making in Scarcity Situations.J. J. M. van Delden - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):207-211.
    The issue of the allocation of resources in health care is here to stay. The goal of this study was to explore the views of physicians on several topics that have arisen in the debate on the allocation of scarce resources and to compare these with the views of policy makers. We asked physicians and policy makers to participate in an interview about their practices and opinions concerning factors playing a role in decision making for patients in different (...)
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  32.  94
    Ethical Case Deliberation and Decision Making.Diego Gracia - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):227-233.
    During the last thirty years different methods have been proposed in order to manage and resolve ethical quandaries, specially in the clinical setting. Some of these methodologies are based on the principles of Decision-making theory. Others looked to other philosophical traditions, like Principlism, Hermeneutics, Narrativism, Casuistry, Pragmatism, etc. This paper defends the view that deliberation is the cornerstone of any adequate methodology. This is due to the fact that moral decisions must take into account not only principles and (...)
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  33.  57
    Supported DecisionMaking and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Article 12 (Equal Recognition before the Law) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addresses this issue of decision-making for persons with disabilities: the recognition of legal capacity. Legal capacity means recognizing the right to make decisions for oneself. Article 12 is also moving in the direction of supported decision-making, (...)
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  34.  64
    Evidence-Free Medicine: Forgoing Evidence in Clinical Decision Making.Mark R. Tonelli - 2009 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):319-331.
  35.  32
    Decision Making Capacity Should Not Be Decisive in Emergencies.Dieneke Hubbeling - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):229-238.
    Examples of patients with anorexia nervosa, depression or borderline personality disorder who have decision-making capacity as currently operationalized, but refuse treatment, are discussed. It appears counterintuitive to respect their treatment refusal because their wish seems to be fuelled by their illness and the consequences of their refusal of treatment are severe. Some proposed solutions have focused on broadening the criteria for decision-making capacity, either in general or for specific patient groups, but these adjustments might discriminate against (...)
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  36.  24
    Supported Decision-Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Adults with intellectual disabilities are characterized by the limitations in their intellectual functioning and in their adaptive behavior, which compromises three skill types, and this starts before the age of 18. Though persons with intellectual disabilities are characterized by having these limitations, they are thought to face significant decisionmaking challenges due to their disability. Moving away from this (...)
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  37.  64
    IRB Decision-Making with Imperfect Knowledge: A Framework for Evidence-Based Research Ethics Review.Emily E. Anderson & James M. DuBois - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):951-969.
    Institutional Review Board decisions hinge on the availability and interpretation of information. This is demonstrated by the following well-known historical example. In 2001, 24-year-old Ellen Roche died from respiratory distress and organ failure as a result of her participation in a study at Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center. The non-therapeutic physiological study, “Mechanisms of Deep Inspiration-Induced Airway Relaxation,” was designed to examine airway hyperresponsiveness in healthy individuals in order to better understand the pathophysiology of asthma. Participants inhaled hexamethonium, a (...)
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  38.  28
    Strategic Maneuvering in Treatment Decision-Making Discussions: Two Cases in Point. [REVIEW]Nanon Labrie - 2012 - Argumentation 26 (2):171-199.
    Over the past decade, the ideal model of shared decision-making has been increasingly promoted as the preferred standard of doctor-patient communication in medical consultation. The model advocates a treatment decision-making process in which the doctor and his patient are considered coequal partners that carefully negotiate the treatment options available in order to ultimately reach a treatment decision that is mutually shared. Thereby, the model notably leaves room for—and stimulates—argumentative discussions to arise in the context of (...)
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  39.  4
    Dementia, Healthcare Decision Making, and Disability Law.Megan S. Wright - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S4):25-33.
    Persons with dementia often prefer to participate in decisions about their health care, but may be prevented from doing so because healthcare decision-making law facilitates use of advance directives or surrogate decision makers for persons with decisional impairments such as dementia. Federal and state disability law provide alternative decision-making models that do not prevent persons with mild to moderate dementia from making their own healthcare decisions at the time the decision needs to be (...)
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  40.  30
    Shared Decision Making After MacIntyre.J. Tilburt - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):148-169.
    This paper explores the practical consequences that Enlightenment ideals had on morality as it applies to clinical practice, using Alisdair MacIntyre's conceptualization and critique of the Enlightenment as its reference point. Taking the perspective of a practicing clinician, I critically examine the historical origins of ideas that made shared decision making (SDM) a necessary and ideal model of clinician-patient relationship. I then build on MacIntyre's critique of Enlightenment thought and examine its implications for conceptions of shared decision- (...) that use an Enlightenment justification, as well as examining contemporary threats to SDM that the Enlightenment made possible. I conclude by offering an alternative framing of SDM that fits with the clinician's duty to act on behalf of and along with patients but that avoids the tenuous Enlightenment assumptions that MacIntyre's work so vocally critiques. (shrink)
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  41. Clinical Decision-Making: The Case Against the New Casuistry.Mahesh Ananth - 2017 - Issues in Law and Medicine 32 (2):143-171.
    Albert Jonsen and Stephen Toulmin have argued that the best way to resolve complex “moral” issues in clinical settings is to focus on the details of specific cases. This approach to medical decision-making, labeled ‘casuistry’, has met with much criticism in recent years. In response to this criticism, Carson Strong has attempted to salvage much of Jonsen’s and Toulmin’s version of casuistry. He concludes that much of their analysis, including Jonsen’s further elaboration about the casuistic methodology, is on (...)
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  42.  15
    Ethical Decision Making in Neonatal Units — The Normative Significance of Vitality.Berit Støre Brinchmann & Per Nortvedt - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):193-200.
    This article will be concerned with the phenomenon of vitality, which emerged as one of the main findings in a larger grounded theory study about life and death decisions in hospitals' neonatal units. Definite signs showing the new-born infant's energy and vigour contributed to the clinician's judgements about life expectancy and the continuation or termination of medical treatment. In this paper we will discuss the normative importance of vitality as a diagnostic cue and will argue that vitality, as a sign (...)
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  43.  83
    Adherence, Shared Decision-Making and Patient Autonomy.Lars Sandman, Bradi B. Granger, Inger Ekman & Christian Munthe - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):115-127.
    In recent years the formerly quite strong interest in patient compliance has been questioned for being too paternalistic and oriented towards overly narrow biomedical goals as the basis for treatment recommendations. In line with this there has been a shift towards using the notion of adherence to signal an increased weight for patients’ preferences and autonomy in decision making around treatments. This ‘adherence-paradigm’ thus encompasses shared decision-making as an ideal and patient perspective and autonomy as guiding (...)
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  44. Physician-Patient Decision-Making: A Study in Medical Ethics.Douglas N. Walton - 1985 - Greenwood Press.
    Walton offers a comprehensive, flexible model for physician-patient decision making, the first such tool designed to be applied at the level of each particular case. Based on Aristotelian practical reasoning, it develops a method of reasonable dialogue, a question- and-answer process of interaction leading to informed consent on the part of the patient, and to a decision--mutually arrived at--reflecting both high medical standards and the patient's felt needs. After setting forth his model, he applies it to three (...)
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  45.  63
    Rational Diagnosis and Treatment: Evidence-Based Clinical Decision-Making.Peter Gøtzsche - 2007 - J. Wiley.
    Now in its fourth edition, Rational Diagnosis and Treatment: Evidence-Based Clinical Decision - Making is a unique book to look at evidence-based medicine and the difficulty of applying evidence from group studies to individual patients._ The book analyses the successive stages of the decision process and deals with topics such as the examination of the patient,_the reliability of clinical data, the logic of diagnosis, the fallacies of uncontrolled therapeutic experience and the need for randomised clinical trials (...)
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  46. Toward a Methodology for Moral Decision Making in Medicine.Thomasine Kushner, Raymond A. Belliotti & Donald Buckner - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (4).
    The failure of medical codes to provide adequate guidance for physicians' moral dilemmas points to the fact that some rules of analysis, informed by moral theory, are needed to assist in resolving perplexing ethical problems occurring with increasing frequency as medical technology advances. Initially, deontological and teleological theories appear more helpful, but critcisms can be lodged against both, and neither proves to be sufficient in itself. This paper suggests that to elude the limitations of previous approaches, a method of moral (...)
     
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  47.  20
    Prudence in Shared Decision-Making: The Missing Link Between the “Technically Correct” and the “Morally Good” in Medical Decision-Making.Paul Muleli Kioko & Pablo Requena Meana - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (1):17-36.
    Shared Decision-Making is a widely accepted model of the physician–patient relationship providing an ethical environment in which physician beneficence and patient autonomy are respected. It acknowledges the moral responsibility of physician and patient by promoting a deliberative collaboration in which their individual expertise—complementary in nature, equal in importance—is emphasized, and personal values and preferences respected. Its goal coincides with Pellegrino and Thomasma’s proximate end of medicine, that is, a technically correct and morally good healing decision for (...)
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  48.  74
    Patient Autonomy, Clinical Decision Making, and the Phenomenological Reduction.Jonathan Lewis & Søren Holm - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-13.
    Phenomenology gives rise to certain ontological considerations that have far-reaching implications for standard conceptions of patient autonomy in medical ethics, and, as a result, the obligations of and to patients in clinical decision-making contexts. One such consideration is the phenomenological reduction in classical phenomenology, a core feature of which is the characterisation of our primary experiences as immediately and inherently meaningful. This paper builds on and extends the analyses of the phenomenological reduction in the works of Husserl, Heidegger, (...)
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  49.  14
    Doing Theology in Medical Decision-Making.John Brewer Eberly Jr & Benjamin Wade Frush - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):718-719.
    Religious considerations in medical decision-making have enjoyed newfound attention in recent years, challenging the assumption that the domains of biological and spiritual flourishing can be cleanly separated in clinical practice. A surprising majority of patients desire their physicians to engage their religious and spiritual concerns, yet most never receive such attention, particularly in cases near the end of life where such attention seems most warranted.1–3 As physicians Aparna Sajja and Christina Puchalski recently wrote in the AMA Journal of (...)
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  50.  15
    The Impact of a Patient Decision Aid on Shared DecisionMaking Behaviour in Oncology Care and Pulmonary Medicine—A Field Study Based on Real‐Life Observations.Karina Olling, Mette Stie, Bodil Winther & Karina Dahl Steffensen - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):1121-1130.
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