Order:
  1. Country Reports.Ma'N. H. Zawati, Don Chalmers, Sueli G. Dallari, Marina de Neiva Borba, Miriam Pinkesz, Yann Joly, Haidan Chen, Mette Hartlev, Liis Leitsalu, Sirpa Soini, Emmanuelle Rial-Sebbag, Nils Hoppe, Tina Garani-Papadatos, Panagiotis Vidalis, Krishna Ravi Srinivas, Gil Siegal, Stefania Negri, Ryoko Hatanaka, Maysa Al-Hussaini, Amal Al-Tabba', Lourdes Motta-Murgía, Laura Estela Torres Moran, Aart Hendriks, Obiajulu Nnamuchi, Rosario Isasi, Dorota Krekora-Zajac, Eman Sadoun, Calvin Ho, Pamela Andanda, Won Bok Lee, Pilar Nicolás, Titti Mattsson, Vladislava Talanova, Alexandre Dosch, Dominique Sprumont, Chien-Te Fan, Tzu-Hsun Hung, Jane Kaye, Andelka Phillips, Heather Gowans, Nisha Shah & James W. Hazel - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):582-704.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  5
    Evaluating the understanding of the ethical and moral challenges of Big Data and AI among Jordanian medical students, physicians in training, and senior practitioners: a cross-sectional study.Abdallah Al-Ani, Abdallah Rayyan, Ahmad Maswadeh, Hala Sultan, Ahmad Alhammouri, Hadeel Asfour, Tariq Alrawajih, Sarah Al Sharie, Fahed Al Karmi, Ahmad Azzam, Asem Mansour & Maysa Al-Hussaini - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-14.
    Aims To examine the understanding of the ethical dilemmas associated with Big Data and artificial intelligence (AI) among Jordanian medical students, physicians in training, and senior practitioners. Methods We implemented a literature-validated questionnaire to examine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the target population during the period between April and August 2023. Themes of ethical debate included privacy breaches, consent, ownership, augmented biases, epistemology, and accountability. Participants’ responses were showcased using descriptive statistics and compared between groups using t-test or ANOVA. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  14
    Disclosure of medical errors: physicians’ knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) in an oncology center.Razan Mansour, Khawlah Ammar, Amal Al-Tabba, Thalia Arawi, Asem Mansour & Maysa Al-Hussaini - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundBetween the need for transparency in healthcare, widely promoted by patient’s safety campaigns, and the fear of negative consequences and malpractice threats, physicians face challenging decisions on whether or not disclosing medical errors to patients and families is a valid option.We aim to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of physicians in our center regarding medical error disclosure.MethodsThis is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire study. The questionnaire was piloted and no major modifications were made.A day-long training workshop consisting of didactic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark