15 found
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  1.  14
    Reason's Traces: Identity and Interpretation in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist Thought.Mark Siderits & Matthew T. Kapstein - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (4):824.
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  2.  27
    Who Wrote the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa? Reflections on an Enigmatic Text and Its Place in the History of Buddhist Philosophy.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):1-30.
    In recent decades, scholars of Buddhist philosophy have frequently treated the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa, or “Teaching of the Three Natures,” attributed to Vasubandhu, as an authentic and authoritative representation of that celebrated thinker’s mature work within the Yogācāra tradition. However, serious questions may be posed concerning the status and authority of the TSN within Yogācāra, its true authorship, and the relation of its contents to trends in early Yogācāra thought. In the present article, we review the actual state of our knowledge of (...)
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  3. The Tibetan Assimilation of Buddhism: Conversion, Contestation, and Memory.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    Thanks to the international celebrity of the present Dalai Lama, Tibetan Buddhism is attracting more attention than at any time in its history. Although there have been numerous specialist studies of individual Tibetan texts, however, no scholarly work has as yet done justice to the rich variety of types of Tibetan discourse. This book fills this lacuna, bringing to bear the best methodological insights of the contemporary human sciences, and at the same time conveying to non-specialist readers an impression of (...)
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  4.  37
    Buddhist Idealists and Their Jain Critics On Our Knowledge of External Objects.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:123-147.
    In accord with the theme of the present volume on , it is not so much the aim of this essay to provide a detailed account of particular lines of argument, as it is to suggest something of the manner in which so-called 'Buddhist idealism' unfolded as a tradition not just for Buddhists, but within Indian philosophy more generally. Seen from this perspective, Buddhist idealism remained a current within Indian philosophy long after the demise of Buddhism in India, in about (...)
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  5.  3
    “Spiritual Exercise” and Buddhist Epistemologists in India and Tibet.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2013 - In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 270–289.
    Though Stcherbatsky was eager to present Buddhist logic as broadly consistent with an early twentieth‐century European vision of philosophical research as critical reason unbridled by the presuppositions of religion, this was certainly not the sole source of the tension found in his words. There were at least three major trends in relation to this problematic that can be identified within Buddhist textual traditions. This chapter explores somewhat the elaboration of these alternatives, both in traditional Buddhist and in contemporary academic writings. (...)
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  6.  10
    Stoics and Bodhisattvas: Spiritual Exercise and Faith in Two Philosophical Traditions.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2020-10-05 - In James M. Ambury, Tushar Irani & Kathleen Wallace (eds.), Philosophy as a way of life: historical, contemporary, and pedagogical perspectives. Malden, MA: Wiley. pp. 99–115.
    The project of comparing Stoicism and Buddhism may appear to be an improbable one. While the latter determines that we strive for an enlightenment that contributes to the liberation of all living beings, the doctrines of the former would seem to entail that this is impossible. Though both strongly affirm principles of causality and cyclicity in the constitution of the world, Buddhism apparently grants considerably more freedom of human agency than does Stoicism. Their conception of eternal return in the strict (...)
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  7.  7
    Illusions of Knowing.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2023 - Philosophy East and West 73 (4):1023-1046.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Illusions of KnowingMatthew T. Kapstein (bio)Knowing Illusion: Bringing a Tibetan Debate into Contemporary Discourse, Volume I: A Philosophical History of the Debate, and Volume II: Translations. By The Yakherds ( José Cabezón, Ryan Conlon, Thomas Doctor, Douglas Duckworth, Jed Forman, Jay Garfield, John Powers, Sonam Thakchöe, Tashi Tsering, and Geshé Yeshes Thabkhas). New York: Oxford University Press, 2020.Metaphysics is a subject much more curious than useful, the knowledge of (...)
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  8. Buddhist idealists and their Jain critics on our knowledge of external objects.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2014 - In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Philosophical Traditions. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  9.  10
    About Padmasambhava: Historical Narratives and Later Transformations of Guru Rinpoche, edited by Geoffrey Samuel and Jamyang Oliphant.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2022 - Buddhist Studies Review 39 (1):141-145.
    About Padmasambhava: Historical Narratives and Later Transformations of Guru Rinpoche, edited by Geoffrey Samuel and Jamyang Oliphant. Garuda Verlag, 2020. 299 pp. Pb CHF 39,80. ISBN-13: 9783906139364.
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  10.  11
    Collins and Parfit Three Decades On.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):207-210.
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  11.  8
    Le refus bouddhiste du théisme.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2004 - Diogène 205 (1):69-75.
    Résumé Le bouddhisme ne semble pas avoir été intéressé, au début, aux questions concernant l’existence et la nature de dieu, les considérant sans importance pour la question de l’affranchissement de la souffrance terrestre qui est au cœur de la sotériologie bouddhiste. Plus tard, la pensée bouddhiste a considéré le théisme incompatible avec la doctrine bouddhiste. Mais, en même temps, le bouddhisme a développé une dimension de dévotion ayant des ressemblances avec la foi théiste. Conscients d’un héritage religieux différent, les penseurs (...)
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  12. The Experience of Light: Divine Radiance and Religious Experience.Matthew T. Kapstein (ed.) - 2005, - The University of Chicago Press.
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  13.  32
    The Buddhist Refusal of Theism.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (1):61-65.
    Early Buddhism was not interested in questions about existence and the nature of God, considering these unimportant in relation to the question of the release from earthly suffering which is at the heart of Buddhist soteriology. Later Buddhist thought considered theism incompatible with Buddhist doctrine, but at the same time Buddhism developed a dimension of devotion that resembled theistic faith. Conscious of their different religious heritage, Buddhist thinkers in more recent times have nevertheless embraced dialogue with monotheistic religions, emphasizing their (...)
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  14.  29
    Book ReviewsPeter Harvey,. An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values, and Issues.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Pp. xx+478. $54.95 ; $19.95. [REVIEW]Matthew T. Kapstein - 2002 - Ethics 113 (1):161-163.
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  15.  17
    Review of History of Indian Philosophy, by Purushottama Bilimoria, Editor-in Chief; J.N. Mohanty, Amy Rayner, John Powers, Stephen Phillips, Richard King, and Christopher Key Chapple, Associate Editors, Routledge History of World Philosophies: London/new York: Routledge, 2018. xxv + 611 pp. [REVIEW]Matthew T. Kapstein - 2019 - Sophia 58 (4):761-762.