7 found
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  1.  19
    Returning Individual Research Results from Digital Phenotyping in Psychiatry.Francis X. Shen, Matthew L. Baum, Nicole Martinez-Martin, Adam S. Miner, Melissa Abraham, Catherine A. Brownstein, Nathan Cortez, Barbara J. Evans, Laura T. Germine, David C. Glahn, Christine Grady, Ingrid A. Holm, Elisa A. Hurley, Sara Kimble, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Kimberlyn Leary, Mason Marks, Patrick J. Monette, Jukka-Pekka Onnela, P. Pearl O’Rourke, Scott L. Rauch, Carmel Shachar, Srijan Sen, Ipsit Vahia, Jason L. Vassy, Justin T. Baker, Barbara E. Bierer & Benjamin C. Silverman - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (2):69-90.
    Psychiatry is rapidly adopting digital phenotyping and artificial intelligence/machine learning tools to study mental illness based on tracking participants’ locations, online activity, phone and text message usage, heart rate, sleep, physical activity, and more. Existing ethical frameworks for return of individual research results (IRRs) are inadequate to guide researchers for when, if, and how to return this unprecedented number of potentially sensitive results about each participant’s real-world behavior. To address this gap, we convened an interdisciplinary expert working group, supported by (...)
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  2. The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials?Matthew L. Baum - 2011 - Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in criminal (...)
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  3.  36
    Nudge Ethics: Just a Game of Billiards?Caroline J. Huang & Matthew L. Baum - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):22-24.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 22-24, February 2012.
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  4.  18
    Duties toward Patients with Psychiatric Illness.Rachel C. Conrad, Matthew L. Baum, Sejal B. Shah, Nomi C. Levy-Carrick, Jhilam Biswas, Naomi A. Schmelzer & David Silbersweig - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):67-69.
    Patients with psychiatric illness feel the brunt of the intersection of many of our society's and our health care system's disparities, and the vulnerability of this population during the Covid‐19 pandemic cannot be overstated. Patients with psychiatric illness often suffer from the stigma of mental illness and receive poor medical care. Many patients with severe and persistent mental illness face additional barriers, including poverty, marginal housing, and food insecurity. Patients who require psychiatric hospitalization now face the risk of transmission of (...)
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  5.  19
    A Rational Basis for Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer.Caroline J. Huang & Matthew L. Baum - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):27-29.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 27-29, December 2011.
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  6. Genetics and dementia : ethical concerns.Caroline J. Huang, Michael Parker & Matthew L. Baum - 2014 - In Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring & Israel Doron (eds.), The law and ethics of dementia. Portland, Oregon: Hart Publishing.
     
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  7.  7
    Incidental Findings from Deep Phenotyping Research in Psychiatry: Legal and Ethical Considerations.Amanda Kim, Michael Hsu, Amanda Koire & Matthew L. Baum - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (4):482-486.
    Substantial advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders may come from assembling diverse data streams from clinical notes, neuroimaging, genetics, and real-time digital footprints from smartphones and wearable devices. This is called “deep phenotyping” and often involves machine learning. We argue that incidental findings arising in deep phenotyping research have certain special, morally and legally salient features: They are specific, actionable, numerous, and probabilistic. We consider ethical and legal implications of these features and propose a practical ethics strategy (...)
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