45 found
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  1.  18
    Duties When an Anonymous Student Health Survey Finds a Hot Spot of Suicidality.Arnold H. Levinson, M. Franci Crepeau-Hobson, Marilyn E. Coors, Jacqueline J. Glover, Daniel S. Goldberg & Matthew K. Wynia - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (10):50-60.
    Public health agencies regularly survey randomly selected anonymous students to track drug use, sexual activities, and other risk behaviors. Students are unidentifiable, but a recent project that i...
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  2.  68
    “Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me …?” A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement.Matthew K. Wynia, Emily E. Anderson, Kavita Shah & Timothy D. Hotze - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):3 - 13.
    Using medical advances to enhance human athletic, aesthetic, and cognitive performance, rather than to treat disease, has been controversial. Little is known about physicians? experiences, views, and attitudes in this regard. We surveyed a national sample of physicians to determine how often they prescribe enhancements, their views on using medicine for enhancement, and whether they would be willing to prescribe a series of potential interventions that might be considered enhancements. We find that many physicians occasionally prescribe enhancements, but doctors hold (...)
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  3.  9
    When People Facing Dementia Choose to Hasten Death: The Landscape of Current Ethical, Legal, Medical, and Social Considerations in the United States.Emily A. Largent, Jane Lowers, Thaddeus Mason Pope, Timothy E. Quill & Matthew K. Wynia - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (S1):11-21.
    Some individuals facing dementia contemplate hastening their own death: weighing the possibility of living longer with dementia against the alternative of dying sooner but avoiding the later stages of cognitive and functional impairment. This weighing resonates with an ethical and legal consensus in the United States that individuals can voluntarily choose to forgo life‐sustaining interventions and also that medical professionals can support these choices even when they will result in an earlier death. For these reasons, whether and how a terminally (...)
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  4.  87
    When pestilence prevails physician responsibilities in epidemics.Samuel J. Huber & Matthew K. Wynia - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):5 – 11.
    The threat of bioterrorism, the emergence of the SARS epidemic, and a recent focus on professionalism among physicians, present a timely opportunity for a review of, and renewed commitment to, physician obligations to care for patients during epidemics. The professional obligation to care for contagious patients is part of a larger "duty to treat," which historically became accepted when 1) a risk of nosocomial infection was perceived, 2) an organized professional body existed to promote the duty, and 3) the public (...)
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  5.  35
    Improving Fairness in Coverage Decisions: Performance Expectations for Quality Improvement.Matthew K. Wynia, Deborah Cummins, David Fleming, Kari Karsjens, Amber Orr, James Sabin, Inger Saphire-Bernstein & Renee Witlen - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):87-100.
    Patients and physicians often perceive the current health care system to be unfair, in part because of the ways in which coverage decisions appear to be made. To address this problem the Ethical Force Program, a collaborative effort to create quality improvement tools for ethics in health care, has developed five content areas specifying ethical criteria for fair health care benefits design and administration. Each content area includes concrete recommendations and measurable expectations for performance improvement, which can be used by (...)
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  6. Ethics and public health emergencies: Restrictions on liberty.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):1 – 5.
    Responses to public health emergencies can entail difficult decisions about restricting individual liberties to prevent the spread of disease. The quintessential example is quarantine. While isolating sick patients tends not to provoke much concern, quarantine of healthy people who only might be infected often is controversial. In fact, as the experience with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) shows, the vast majority of those placed under quarantine typically don't become ill. Efforts to enforce involuntary quarantine through military or police powers also (...)
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  7.  14
    Treating Workers as Essential Too: An Ethical Framework for Public Health Interventions to Prevent and Control COVID-19 Infections among Meat-processing Facility Workers and Their Communities in the United States.Kelly K. Dineen, Abigail Lowe, Nancy E. Kass, Lisa M. Lee, Matthew K. Wynia, Teck Chuan Voo, Seema Mohapatra, Rachel Lookadoo, Athena K. Ramos, Jocelyn J. Herstein, Sara Donovan, James V. Lawler, John J. Lowe, Shelly Schwedhelm & Nneka O. Sederstrom - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (2):301-314.
    Meat is a multi-billion-dollar industry that relies on people performing risky physical work inside meat-processing facilities over long shifts in close proximity. These workers are socially disempowered, and many are members of groups beset by historic and ongoing structural discrimination. The combination of working conditions and worker characteristics facilitate the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Workers have been expected to put their health and lives at risk during the pandemic because of government and industry pressures to keep (...)
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  8.  16
    Comments Confirm That Student Health Surveillance Needs Ethics Guidelines to Act on Risk-Cluster Findings.Arnold H. Levinson, M. Franci Crepeau-Hobson, Jacqueline Glover, Marilyn E. Coors, Daniel S. Goldberg & Matthew K. Wynia - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (10):W4-W7.
    Volume 20, Issue 10, October 2020, Page W4-W7.
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  9.  87
    Ethics and public health emergencies: Rationing vaccines.Matthew K. Wynia - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):4 – 7.
    There are three broad ethical issues related to handling public health emergencies. They are the three R's - rationing, restrictions and responsibilities. Recently, a severe shortage of annual influenza vaccine in the US, combined with the threat of pandemic flu, has provided an opportunity for policy makers to think about rationing in very concrete terms. Some lessons from annual flu vaccination likely will apply to pandemic vaccine distribution, but many preparatory decisions must be based on very rough estimates. What ethical (...)
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  10.  9
    Ethical Triage Demands a Better Triage Survivability Score.Matthew K. Wynia & Peter D. Sottile - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):75-77.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 75-77.
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  11.  30
    Oversimplifications I: Physicians don't do public health.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):4 – 5.
    *The views in this article are the author's alone and should not be construed as policy statements of the American Medical Association.
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  12.  34
    Oversimplifications II: Public Health Ethics Ignores Individual Rights.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):6-8.
    * Disclaimer: The views expressed are the author's own. This article should not be construed as representing policies of the American Medical Association.
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  13.  34
    Ethics and public health emergencies: Encouraging responsibility.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):1 – 4.
    The three primary ethical challenges in preparing for public health emergencies - addressing questions of rationing, restrictions and responsibilities - all entail confronting uncertainty. But the third, considering whether people and institutions will live up to their responsibilities in a crisis, is perhaps the hardest to predict and therefore plan for. The quintessential example of a responsibility during a public health emergency is that of health care professionals' obligation to continue caring for patients during epidemics. Historically, this 'duty to treat' (...)
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  14. Mandating vaccination: What counts as a "mandate" in public health and when should they be used?Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):2 – 6.
    Recent arguments over whether certain public health interventions should be mandatory raise questions about what counts as a "mandate." A mandate is not the same as a mere recommendation or the standard of practice. At minimum, a mandate should require an active opt-out and there should be some penalty for refusing to abide by it. Over-loose use of the term "mandate" and the easing of opt-out provisions could eventually pose a risk to the gains that truly mandatory public health interventions, (...)
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  15.  44
    Risk and trust in public health: A cautionary tale.Matthew K. Wynia & American Medical Association - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):3 – 6.
    *The views expressed are the author's own. This article should not be construed as representing policies of the American Medical Association.
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  16.  35
    Public health principlism: The precautionary principle and beyond.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):3 – 4.
    *The views represented are the author's alone and should not be construed as representing policies of the American Medical Association.
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  17. Improving access to health care: A consensus ethical framework to guide proposals for reform.Mark A. Levine, Matthew K. Wynia, Paul M. Schyve, J. Russell Teagarden, David A. Fleming, Sharon King Donohue, Ron J. Anderson, James Sabin & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):14-19.
  18.  50
    Public health, public trust and lobbying.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):4 – 7.
    Each year, infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) leads to millions of abnormal Pap smears and thousands of cases of cervical cancer in the US. Throughout the developing world, where Pap smears are less common, HPV is a leading cause of cancer death among women. So when the international pharmaceutical giant Merck developed a vaccine that could prevent infection with several key strains of HPV, the public health community was anxious to celebrate a major advance. But then marketing and lobbying got (...)
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  19.  30
    Routine screening: Informed consent, stigma and the waning of HIV exceptionalism.Matthew K. Wynia - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):5 – 8.
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently recommended that HIV screening should become routine for all adults in the United States. Implicit in the CDC proposal is the notion that pre-test counseling would be more limited than at present, and that written informed consent to screening would no longer be required. If widely implemented, routine testing would mark a tremendous shift in the US HIV screening strategy. There are a number of considerations used to determine what screening tests (...)
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  20.  37
    Consequentialism and Harsh interrogations.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):4 – 6.
    With this issue, we begin a regular feature on bioethics and public health. We welcome Matthew K. Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., Director of the Institute for Ethics of the American Medical Association as our new Contributing Editor. If you have comments or suggestions regarding this feature, please email us at manuscript@ bioethics.net.
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  21.  37
    Science, faith and AIDS: The battle over harm reduction.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):3 – 4.
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  22.  18
    The Honesty Effect.Bette-Jane Crigger & Matthew K. Wynia - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (3):3-3.
    Anne Barnhill focuses her article in this issue on the American Medical Association's ethics policy governing clinical use of placebos, but the implications of her analysis are deeper, touching on how physicians should make judgments about which interventions to offer patients in the process of shared decision‐making. The bottom line is that, even if an undisclosed placebo might be marginally more effective for a particular patient in the short term, over the long haul the integrity of the patient‐physician relationship relies (...)
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  23. Physician professionalism and preparing for epidemics: Challenges and opportunities.Matthew K. Wynia, Jacob F. Kurlander & Shane K. Green - 2006 - Advances in Bioethics 9:135-161.
     
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  24.  54
    Fairness and the Public's Role in Defining Decent Benefits.Matthew K. Wynia & Susan Dorr Goold - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):1 - 2.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 1-2, July 2011.
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  25.  15
    Spheres of Morality: Is There a Point?Brian M. Jackson & Matthew K. Wynia - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (12):5-7.
    Since physicians began to formally professionalize in the 19th century, we have sought to set ourselves apart from other occupations through the adoption (and variable enforcement) of codes of ethi...
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  26.  24
    Answering the 'So What?' Question for Empirical Research in Bioethics.Matthew K. Wynia - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):68-69.
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  27.  37
    The Social-Contract Model of Professionalism: Baby or Bath Water?Jacob E. Kurlander, Karine Morin & Matthew K. Wynia - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):33-36.
  28.  7
    Past: Imperfect; Future: Tense.Matthew K. Wynia - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (5):2-2.
    How should the field of bioethics grapple with a history that includes ethicists who supported eugenics, scientific racism, and even Nazi medicine and also ethicists who created the salutary policy and practice responses to those heinous aspects of medical history? Learning humility from studying historical errors is one path to improvement; finding courage from studying historical strengths is another, but these can be in tension. This commentary lays out these paths and seeks to apply them both to a contemporary challenge (...)
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  29. Survey Research in Bioethics.G. Caleb Alexander & Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - Advances in Bioethics 11:139-160.
     
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  30.  28
    Clinical Image Consent Requirements: Variability among Top Ten Medical Journals.Juan N. Lessing, Nicholas M. Mark, Matthew K. Wynia & Ethan Cumbler - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (4):423-427.
    The consent process for publication of clinical images in medical journals varies widely. The extent of this variation is not known. It is also not known whether journals follow their own stated best practices or the guidance of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. We assessed consent requirements in a sample of 10 top impact factor general medicine journals that publish clinical images, examining variability in consent requirements for clinical image publication and congruence of requirements with the recommendations of (...)
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  31.  6
    Pertinent Today: What Contemporary Lessons Should be Taught by Studying Physician Participation in the Holocaust?Mark A. Levine, Matthew K. Wynia, Meleah Himber & William S. Silvers - 2019 - Conatus 4 (2):287.
    The participation of physicians in the atrocities of the Holocaust exposed vulnerabilities in medicine’s moral commitment to patients’ best interests that every health professional should recognize. Teaching about this history is challenging, as it is extremely complex and there are no common standards for what basic historical facts students in health professions training programs should learn. Nor is there guidance on how these historical facts can or should be related to contemporary ethical issues facing health professionals. To address these problems, (...)
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  32.  8
    Crisis Standards of Care—More Than Just a Thought Experiment?Anuj B. Mehta & Matthew K. Wynia - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (5):53-55.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 51, Issue 5, Page 53-55, September‐October 2021.
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  33.  35
    Ethics and Heroin Prescription: No More Fuzzy Goals!Amber S. Orr & Matthew K. Wynia - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):52-53.
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  34.  33
    What is managed care anyway?Abraham P. Schwab, Kelly A. Carroll & Matthew K. Wynia - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):36 – 37.
    1The opinions contained in this article are those of the authors and should not be construed as policies of the American Medical Association.
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  35.  30
    The Elephant in the Room: Collaboration and Competition among Relief Organizations during High-Profile Disasters.Italo Subbarao, Matthew K. Wynia & Frederick M. Burkle Jr - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):328-334.
    The non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that assume the bulk of emergency care during large-scale disasters in the developing world must expend considerable time and resources to ensure donations to sustain their field operations. This long-standing dilemma for the humanitarian community can create a competitive environment that: • Compromises the delivery and quality of services,• Allows the effectiveness of operations to be compromised by a lack of cooperation and collaboration,• Disrupts the timely and accurate coordination and analysis of outcome measures that• Undermines (...)
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  36.  48
    A Response to Commentators on “Improving Fairness in Coverage Decisions: Performance Expectations for Quality Improvement”.Matthew K. Wynia, Deborah Cummins, David Fleming, Kari Karsjens, Amber Orr, James Sabin, Inger Saphire-Bernstein & Renee Witlen - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):W40-W42.
    Patients and physicians often perceive the current health care system to be unfair, in part because of the ways in which coverage decisions appear to be made. To address this problem the Ethical Force Program, a collaborative effort to create quality improvement tools for ethics in health care, has developed five content areas specifying ethical criteria for fair health care benefits design and administration. Each content area includes concrete recommendations and measurable expectations for performance improvement, which can be used by (...)
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  37.  15
    Consequentialism and Outrageous Options: Response to Commentary on “Consequentialism and Harsh Interrogations”.Matthew K. Wynia & American Medical Association* - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W37-W37.
    *Disclaimer: The views expressed are the author's and should not be ascribed to the American Medical Association.
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  38.  18
    Conflicts—and Consensus—about Conflicts of Interest in Medicine.Matthew K. Wynia & Bette–Jane Crigger - 2011 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (2):101-105.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Conflicts—and Consensus—about Conflicts of Interest in MedicineMatthew K. Wynia and Bette–Jane Crigger*This fascinating collection of essays about individual experiences of conflict of interest leaves little doubt that physicians remain divided about the importance, impact and meaning of conflicts of interest in their work. These essays offer differing views about what conflicts of interest look and feel like “on the ground” and about whether specific conflicts of interest are bad, (...)
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  39.  12
    Ethically Navigating the Murky Waters of “Contingency Standards of Care”.Matthew K. Wynia & Jason Persoff - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):20-21.
    Reading Alfandre and colleagues’ compelling paper in this issue of the Journal—in which the authors outline a useful process for navigating the ethics of “contingency” standards of care—brou...
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  40.  30
    Judging public health research: Epistemology, public health and the law.Matthew K. Wynia - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):4 – 7.
  41.  63
    Laying the groundwork for a defense against participation in torture?Matthew K. Wynia - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (1):11-13.
  42.  18
    Mercy Coming Under Strain.Matthew K. Wynia - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):74-76.
  43.  40
    Personal Responsibility, Public Policy, and the Economic Stimulus Plan.Matthew K. Wynia - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (2):13-15.
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  44.  53
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “'Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me…?'A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement”.Timothy D. Hotze, Kavita Shah, Emily E. Anderson & Matthew K. Wynia - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):W1 - W3.
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  45.  18
    The Intractable and the Novel: Looking Ahead in Bioethics.Matthew K. Wynia - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):11-12.
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