Results for 'Matthew A. Douglas'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    Journeys, Not Destinations: Theorizing a Process View of Supply Chain Integrity.Matthew A. Douglas, Diane A. Mollenkopf, Vincent E. Castillo, John E. Bell & Emily C. Dickey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (1):195-220.
    AbstractIntegrity is considered an important corporate value. Yet recent global events have highlighted the challenges firms face at living up to their stated values, especially when extended supply chain partners are involved. The concept of Supply Chain Integrity (SCI) can help firms shift focus beyond internal corporate integrity, toward supply chain integrity. Researchers and managers will benefit from an understanding of the SCI concept toward implementing SCI to better align supply chain partners with stated corporate values. This research fully develops (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  10
    Knights of the Road: Safety, Ethics, and the Professional Truck Driver.Matthew A. Douglas & Stephen M. Swartz - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):567-588.
    Accidents involving large trucks result in significant economic and social costs. As technological solutions have improved, behavioral factors contributing to accidents have risen in importance. The purpose of this research is to investigate how norms, consequences, and personal attitudes influence safety-related ethical judgments and behavioral intentions. The Hunt–Vitell’s theory of ethical decision-making is adapted to test how these factors influence truck drivers’ decisions containing ethical content. Professional truck drivers evaluated decisions presented in two scenarios that included the situation, the decision, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  10
    A. Douglas Stone. Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian. 332 pp. Princeton University Press, 2013.Matthew Saul Leifer - 2016 - Spontaneous Generations 8 (1):105-108.
  4.  53
    Introduction: The Promise of Apathy.Jeffrey M. Perl, A. W. Price, John McDowell, Matthew A. Taylor, Caleb Thompson & Douglas Mao - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (3):340-347.
    This essay is the journal editor's introduction to part 3 of an ongoing symposium on quietism. With reference to writings of James Joyce, Francis Picabia, J. M. Coetzee, Charles Taylor, Alasdair MacIntyre, Elaine Pagels, and Karen King—and with extended reference to Jonathan Lear's study of “cultural devastation,” Radical Hope—Jeffrey Perl explores the possibility that the fear of anomie (“anomiphobia”) is misplaced. He argues that, in comparison with the violence and narrowness of any given social order, anomie may well be preferable, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    Introduction: The Promise of Apathy.Jeffrey M. Perl, Anthony W. Price, John McDowell, Matthew A. Taylor, Caleb Thompson & Douglas Mao - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (3):340-347.
    This essay is the journal editor's introduction to part 3 of an ongoing symposium on quietism. With reference to writings of James Joyce, Francis Picabia, J. M. Coetzee, Charles Taylor, Alasdair MacIntyre, Elaine Pagels, and Karen King—and with extended reference to Jonathan Lear's study of “cultural devastation,” Radical Hope—Jeffrey Perl explores the possibility that the fear of anomie is misplaced. He argues that, in comparison with the violence and narrowness of any given social order, anomie may well be preferable, and, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Matthew.Douglas R. A. Hare & David E. E. Garland - 1993
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    An Actual Natural Setting Improves Mood Better Than Its Virtual Counterpart: A Meta-Analysis of Experimental Data.Matthew H. E. M. Browning, Nathan Shipley, Olivia McAnirlin, Douglas Becker, Chia-Pin Yu, Terry Hartig & Angel M. Dzhambov - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  8.  64
    The Influence of Business Ethics Education on Moral Efficacy, Moral Meaningfulness, and Moral Courage: A Quasi-experimental Study.Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth & Catherine E. Schwoerer - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-14.
    The research described here contributes to the extant empirical research on business ethics education by examining outcomes drawn from the literature on positive organizational scholarship (POS). The general research question explored is whether a course on ethical decision-making in business could positively influence students’ confidence in their abilities to handle ethical problems at work (i.e., moral efficacy), boost the relative importance of ethics in their work lives (i.e., moral meaningfulness), and encourage them to be more courageous in raising ethical problems (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  9.  15
    Douglas A. Vakoch and Matthew F. Dowd. The Drake Equation: Estimating the Prevalence of Extraterrestrial Life through the Ages. [REVIEW]Andrew Oakes - 2018 - Spontaneous Generations 9 (1):186-188.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Douglas A. Vakoch; Matthew F. Dowd . The Drake Equation: Estimating the Prevalence of Extraterrestrial Life through the Ages. xii + 319 pp., index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. £99.99. [REVIEW]Greg Eghigian - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):898-899.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  51
    The Effectiveness of Ethics Education: A Quasi-Experimental Field Study.Douglas R. May & Matthew T. Luth - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):545-568.
    Ethical conduct is the hallmark of excellence in engineering and scientific research, design, and practice. While undergraduate and graduate programs in these areas routinely emphasize ethical conduct, few receive formal ethics training as part of their curricula. The first purpose of this research study was to assess the relative effectiveness of ethics education in enhancing individuals’ general knowledge of the responsible conduct of research practices and their level of moral reasoning. Secondly, we examined the effects of ethics education on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  12.  14
    Continuous isomorphisms from R onto a complete abelian group.Douglas Bridges & Matthew Hendtlass - 2010 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (3):930-944.
    This paper provides a Bishop-style constructive analysis of the contrapositive of the statement that a continuous homomorphism of R onto a compact abelian group is periodic. It is shown that, subject to a weak locatedness hypothesis, if G is a complete (metric) abelian group that is the range of a continuous isomorphism from R, then G is noncompact. A special case occurs when G satisfies a certain local path-connectedness condition at 0. A number of results about one-one and injective mappings (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  8
    Continuous homomorphisms of R onto a compact group.Douglas Bridges & Matthew Hendtlass - 2010 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 56 (2):191-197.
    It is shown within Bishop's constructive mathematics that, under one extra, classically automatic, hypothesis, a continuous homomorphism from R onto a compact metric abelian group is periodic, but that the existence of the minimum value of the period is not derivable.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  26
    The Heights of Humanity: Endurance Sport and the Strenuous Mood.Douglas Hochstetler & Peter Matthew Hopsicker - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):117-135.
    In his article, ?Recovering Humanity: Movement, Sport, and Nature?, Doug Anderson addresses the place of endurance sport, or more generally sport at large, as a potential catalyst for the good life. Anderson contrasts transcendental themes of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson with the pragmatic claims of William James and John Dewey, who focus on human possibility and growth. Our aim is to pursue the pragmatic line of thought championed by James and Dewey as a contrasting but not mutually (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15. The Benefits to the Human Spirit of Acting Ethically at Work: The Effects of Professional Moral Courage on Work Meaningfulness and Life Well-Being.Douglas R. May & Matthew D. Deeg - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (2):397-411.
    AbstractOrganizations receive multiple benefits when their members act ethically. Of interest in this study is if the actors receive benefits as well, especially as individuals look to work to fulfill psychological and social needs in addition to economic ones. Specifically, we highlight a series of ongoing ethical practices embodied in professional moral courage and their relationship to actor’s work meaningfulness and life well-being. Drawing on self-determination theory and affective events theory, we explore how exercising professional moral courage in one’s work (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The source and status of values for socially responsible science.Matthew J. Brown - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):67-76.
    Philosophy of Science After Feminism is an important contribution to philosophy of science, in that it argues for the central relevance of advances from previous work in feminist philosophy of science and articulates a new vision for philosophy of science going in to the future. Kourany’s vision of philosophy of science’s future as “socially engaged and socially responsible” and addressing questions of the social responsibility of science itself has much to recommend it. I focus the book articulation of an ethical-epistemic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  17.  31
    The Descriptive, the Normative, and the Entanglement of Values in Science.Matthew J. Brown - 2021 - In Heather Douglas & Ted Richards (eds.), Science, Values, and Democracy: The 2016 Descartes Lectures. Tempe, AZ, and Washington, DC: Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, Arizona State University. pp. 51-65.
    Heather Douglas has helped to set the standard for twenty-first century discussions in philosophy of science on the topics of values in science and science in democracy. Douglas’s work has been part of a movement to bring the question of values in science back to center of the field and to focus especially on policy-relevant science. This first chapter, on the pervasive entanglement of science and values, includes an improved and definitive statement of the argument from inductive risk, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  12
    Imagining Responsibility, Imagining Responsibly: Reflecting on Our Shared Understandings of Science.Matthew Sample - manuscript
    If we cannot define science using only analysis or description, then we must rely on imagination to provide us with suitable objects of philosophical inquiry. This process links our findings to the particular ways in which we philosophers idealize scientific practice and carve out an experimental space between real world practice and thought experiments. As an example, I examine Heather Douglas’ recent work on the responsibilities of scientists and contrast her account of science with that of “technoscience,” as mobilized (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  13
    Quality Individuals?Douglas Lewis - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):114 - 122.
    I think there are no quality individuals which, in the way required, have the characteristics they ascribe to them. Without these features quality individuals will not serve the purpose for which Matthews and Cohen introduce them. So quite apart from the difficulties there are in Plato's account of predication, not only is Aristotle's account unacceptable as it stands, but also Matthews and Cohen's alteration offers no improvement. Indeed, it seems to me that no account of predication can be constructed which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Social science's conspiracy theory panic: Now they want to cure everyone.Lee Basham & Matthew Dentith - 2016 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5 (10):12-19.
    A response to a declaration in 'Le Monde', 'Luttons efficacement contre les théories du complot' by Gérald Bronner, Véronique Campion-Vincent, Sylvain Delouvée, Sebastian Dieguez, Karen Douglas, Nicolas Gauvrit, Anthony Lantian, and Pascal Wagner-Egger, published on June the 6th, 2016.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  27
    Science, responsibility, and the philosophical imagination.Matthew Sample - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-19.
    If we cannot define science using only analysis or description, then we must rely on imagination to provide us with suitable objects of philosophical inquiry. This process ties our intellectual findings to the particular ways in which we philosophers think about scientific practice and carve out a cognitive space between real world practice and conceptual abstraction. As an example, I consider Heather Douglas’s work on the responsibilities of scientists and document her implicit ideal of science, defined primarily as an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  14
    The imitation of models and the uses of argumenta in topical invention.Douglas Kelly - 1987 - Argumentation 1 (4):365-377.
    Medieval literature is argumentative, since it argues for an idealized vision of reality acceptable to a proposed audience. Its narrative mode is description, performed according to the principles of the art of topical invention, derived from Cicero's De Inventione. The topoi or loci are features (circumstantiae) of a person or thing that are common to it as a class, such as tempus or locus for things. When filled out, according to the point of view desired by the author, public, context, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  4
    Philosophers, Naturalists, and Antipodean Encounters, 1748-1803.Bronwen Douglas - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (3):387-409.
    This article addresses a complex nexus of discourse and praxis: varying Enlightenment visions of Man; emergent ideas about human differences; and encounters between European scientific voyagers and Indigenous people in New Holland (Australia) and Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) at the start of the nineteenth century. Discursively, I trace two strands of ?anthropological? thinking. One, philosophical and economic, is epitomized in French and Scottish stadial theory. The other is naturalist and culminated in Buffon's natural history of man. Both were appropriated from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Goodness and desire.Matthew Boyle & Douglas Lavin - 2010 - In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press. pp. 161--201.
  25. Hedged Assertion.Matthew A. Benton & Peter Van Elswyk - 2020 - In Sanford Goldberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Assertion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 245-263.
    Surprisingly little has been written about hedged assertion. Linguists often focus on semantic or syntactic theorizing about, for example, grammatical evidentials or epistemic modals, but pay far less attention to what hedging does at the level of action. By contrast, philosophers have focused extensively on normative issues regarding what epistemic position is required for proper assertion, yet they have almost exclusively considered unqualified declaratives. This essay considers the linguistic and normative issues side-by-side. We aim to bring some order and clarity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  26. Lying, Belief, and Knowledge.Matthew A. Benton - 2019 - In Jörg Meibauer (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Lying. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 120-133.
    What is the relationship between lying, belief, and knowledge? Prominent accounts of lying define it in terms of belief, namely telling someone something one believes to be false, often with the intent to deceive. This paper develops a novel account of lying by deriving evaluative dimensions of responsibility from the knowledge norm of assertion. Lies are best understood as special cases of vicious assertion; lying is the anti-paradigm of proper assertion. This enables an account of lying in terms of knowledge: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  27. Evil and Evidence.Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Yoaav Isaacs - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 7:1-31.
    The problem of evil is the most prominent argument against the existence of God. Skeptical theists contend that it is not a good argument. Their reasons for this contention vary widely, involving such notions as CORNEA, epistemic appearances, 'gratuitous' evils, 'levering' evidence, and the representativeness of goods. We aim to dispel some confusions about these notions, in particular by clarifying their roles within a probabilistic epistemology. In addition, we develop new responses to the problem of evil from both the phenomenal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  28. Knowledge Norms.Matthew A. Benton - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy:nn-nn.
    Encyclopedia entry covering the growing literature on the Knowledge Norm of Assertion (and its rivals), the Knowledge Norm of Action (and pragmatic encroachment), the Knowledge Norm of Belief, and the Knowledge Norm of Disagreement.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  29. Epistemological Aspects of Hope.Matthew A. Benton - 2019 - In Claudia Blöser & Titus Stahl (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Hope. London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 135-151.
    Hope is an attitude with a distinctive epistemological dimension: it is incompatible with knowledge. This chapter examines hope as it relates to knowledge but also to probability and inductive considerations. Such epistemic constraints can make hope either impossible, or, when hope remains possible, they affect how one’s epistemic situation can make hope rational rather than irrational. Such issues are especially relevant to when hopefulness may permissibly figure in practical deliberation over a course of action. So I consider cases of second-order (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  30. Judeo-Christian Revelation as a Source of Philosophical Reflection According to Étienne Gilson.Matthew A. Bloomer - 2001 - Apollinare Studi.
  31.  10
    Experimental bosonsampling in a photonic circuit.Matthew A. Broome, Alessandro Fedrizzi, Saleh Rahimi-Keshari, Justin Dove, Scott Aaronson, Timothy C. Ralph & Andrew G. White - unknown
    The extended Church-Turing thesis posits that any computable function can be calculated efficiently by a probabilistic Turing machine. If this thesis held true, the global effort to build quantum computers might ultimately be unnecessary. The thesis would however be strongly contradicted by a physical device that efficiently performs a task believed to be intractable for classical computers. BosonSampling - the sampling from a distribution of n photons undergoing some linear-optical process - is a recently developed, and experimentally accessible example of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Knowledge is the Norm of Assertion.Matthew A. Benton - forthcoming - In Blake Roeber, John Turri, Matthias Steup & Ernest Sosa (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Epistemology, 3rd edition. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Assertion is governed by an epistemic norm requiring knowledge. This idea has been hotly debated in recent years, garnering attention in epistemology, philosophy of language, and linguistics. This chapter presents and extends the main arguments in favor of the knowledge norm, from faulty conjunctions, several conversational patterns, judgments of permission, excuse, and blame, and from showing how. (Draft. Comments welcome.).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Disagreement and Religion.Matthew A. Benton - 2021 - In Matthew A. Benton & Jonathan L. Kvanvig (eds.), Religious Disagreement and Pluralism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-40.
    This chapter covers contemporary work on disagreement, detailing both the conceptual and normative issues in play in the debates in mainstream analytic epistemology, and how these relate to religious diversity and disagreement. §1 examines several sorts of disagreement, and considers several epistemological issues: in particular, what range of attitudes a body of evidence can support, how to understand higher-order evidence, and who counts as an epistemic “peer”. §2 considers how these questions surface when considering disagreements over religion, including debates over (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Pragmatic Encroachment and Theistic Knowledge.Matthew A. Benton - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 267-287.
    If knowledge is sensitive to practical stakes, then whether one knows depends in part on the practical costs of being wrong. When considering religious belief, the practical costs of being wrong about theism may differ dramatically between the theist (if there is no God) and the atheist (if there is a God). This paper explores the prospects, on pragmatic encroachment, for knowledge of theism (even if true) and of atheism (even if true), given two types of practical costs: namely, by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. Blastomycotic extensor tenosynovitis of the hand: a case report.Matthew A. Popa, Peter Jl Jebson & Donald P. Condit - 2012 - In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. MIT Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Neither Tortoises nor Snakes: How to Be a Conscientious Objector in the Conflict Between Foundationalism and Coherentism.Matthew A. Burstein - 2003 - Dissertation, Georgetown University
    A great deal of ink has been spilt debating the relative merits of foundationalism and coherentism in contemporary epistemology. In this dissertation, I argue that the debate itself, lively as it's been, rides atop a fundamental mistake. Careful examination of the defenses of these views indicates that both sides rest on a set of problematic presuppositions about justification and the nature of mind. More specifically, they all assume, in one form or another, that epistemic dependence must be inferential, and, as (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology.Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Recent decades have seen a fertile period of theorizing within mainstream epistemology which has had a dramatic impact on how epistemology is done. Investigations into contextualist and pragmatic dimensions of knowledge suggest radically new ways of meeting skeptical challenges and of understanding the relation between the epistemological and practical environment. New insights from social epistemology and formal epistemology about defeat, testimony, a priority, probability, and the nature of evidence all have a potentially revolutionary effect on how we understand our epistemological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Cudworth on Freewill.Matthew A. Leisinger - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (1):1-25.
    In his unpublished freewill manuscripts, Ralph Cudworth seeks to complete the project that he begins in The True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678) by arguing for an account of human liberty that avoids the opposing poles of necessitarianism and indifferency. I argue that Cudworth’s account rests upon a crucial distinction between the will and the power of freewill. Whereas we necessarily will the greater apparent good, freewill is a more fundamental power by which we endeavour to discern the greater (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Religious Diversity and Disagreement.Matthew A. Benton - 2019 - In Miranda Fricker, Peter Graham, David Henderson & Nikolaj Pedersen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Social Epistemology. Routledge. pp. 185-195.
    Epistemologists have shown increased interest in the epistemic significance of disagreement, and in particular, in whether there is a rational requirement concerning belief revision in the face of peer disagreement. This article examines some of the general issues discussed by epistemologists, and then considers how they may or may not apply to the case of religious disagreement, both within religious traditions and between religious (and non-religious) views.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  42
    Moral Relativism: Can One Community Give Another a Reason to Change?Matthew A. Crawford - unknown
    This paper examines the popular philosophical theory of moral relativism. Traditionally, the theory argues that communities have their own conceptual frameworks of morality that are inaccessible to those outside of the community. Thus, one community cannot give another community a moral reason to change a practice. In this paper, I will examine David Velleman’s version of the theory presented in his book Foundations for Moral Relativism. This version posits that the drive towards mutual interpretability is a universal drive among human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  6
    Universes Without Us: Posthuman Cosmologies in American Literature.Matthew A. Taylor - 2013 - London: Univ of Minnesota Press.
    During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a wide variety of American writers proposed the existence of energies connecting human beings to cosmic processes. From varying points of view--scientific, philosophical, religious, and literary--they suggested that such energies would eventually result in the perfection of individual and collective bodies, assuming that assimilation into larger networks of being meant the expansion of humanity's powers and potentialities--a belief that continues to inform much posthumanist theory today. Universes without Us explores a lesser-known countertradition in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Assertion, knowledge and predictions.Matthew A. Benton - 2012 - Analysis 72 (1):102-105.
    John N. Williams (1994) and Matthew Weiner (2005) invoke predictions in order to undermine the normative relevance of knowledge for assertions; in particular, Weiner argues, predictions are important counterexamples to the Knowledge Account of Assertion (KAA). I argue here that they are not true counterexamples at all, a point that can be agreed upon even by those who reject KAA.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  43. Knowledge, Hope, and Fallibilism.Matthew A. Benton - 2021 - Synthese 198:1673-1689.
    Hope, in its propositional construction "I hope that p," is compatible with a stated chance for the speaker that not-p. On fallibilist construals of knowledge, knowledge is compatible with a chance of being wrong, such that one can know that p even though there is an epistemic chance for one that not-p. But self-ascriptions of propositional hope that p seem to be incompatible, in some sense, with self-ascriptions of knowing whether p. Data from conjoining hope self-ascription with outright assertions, with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  44.  69
    Liberty and Suspension in Locke's Essay.Matthew A. Leisinger - 2022 - Locke Studies 21:26–55.
    I argue for two controversial claims about Locke’s account of liberty in Essay 2.21. The first claim is that Locke does not identify liberty with freedom of action. Instead, Locke places further conditions on liberty beyond to the power to perform or forbear an action at will. The second (and closely related) claim is that Locke takes the power to suspend and examine desire to be necessary for liberty—in other words, that possession of the power to suspend and examine desire (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Two more for the knowledge account of assertion.Matthew A. Benton - 2011 - Analysis 71 (4):684-687.
    The Knowledge Norm or Knowledge Account of Assertion (KAA) has received added support recently from data on prompting assertion (Turri 2010) and from a refinement suggesting that assertions ought to express knowledge (Turri 2011). This paper adds another argument from parenthetical positioning, and then argues that KAA’s unified explanation of some of the earliest data (from Moorean conjunctions) adduced in its favor recommends KAA over its rivals.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  46. Gricean Quality.Matthew A. Benton - 2016 - Noûs 50 (4):689-703.
    Some philosophers oppose recent arguments for the Knowledge Norm of Assertion by claiming that assertion, being an act much like any other, will be subject to norms governing acts generally, such as those articulated by Grice for the purpose of successful, cooperative endeavours. But in fact, Grice is a traitor to their cause; or rather, they are his dissenters, not his disciples. Drawing on Grice's unpublished papers, I show that he thought of asserting as a special linguistic act in need (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  47. Lotteries and Prefaces.Matthew A. Benton - 2017 - In Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Contextualism. New York: Routledge. pp. 168-176.
    The lottery and preface paradoxes pose puzzles in epistemology concerning how to think about the norms of reasonable or permissible belief. Contextualists in epistemology have focused on knowledge ascriptions, attempting to capture a set of judgments about knowledge ascriptions and denials in a variety of contexts (including those involving lottery beliefs and the principles of closure). This article surveys some contextualist approaches to handling issues raised by the lottery and preface, while also considering some of the difficulties encountered by those (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Epistemology Personalized.Matthew A. Benton - 2017 - Philosophical Quarterly 67 (269):813-834.
    Recent epistemology has focused almost exclusively on propositional knowledge. This paper considers an underexplored area of epistemology, namely knowledge of persons: if propositional knowledge is a state of mind, consisting in a subject's attitude to a (true) proposition, the account developed here thinks of interpersonal knowledge as a state of minds, involving a subject's attitude to another (existing) subject. This kind of knowledge is distinct from propositional knowledge, but it exhibits a gradability characteristic of context-sensitivity, and admits of shifty thresholds. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  49. A Grotesque in the Garden, by Hud Hudson. [REVIEW]Matthew A. Benton - 2019 - Faith and Philosophy 36 (2):271-275.
  50.  14
    “No one asks for a meal they’ve never eaten.” Or, do African farmers want genetically modified crops?Matthew A. Schnurr & Sarah Mujabi-Mujuzi - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (4):643-648.
    This article reflects on the relative silence of African farmers within debates around the potential for genetically modified crops to transform agriculture on the continent. It proposes two strategies for amplifying these voices—one focused on research methodologies, the other on outreach—in order to transform the conversation around GM’s potential in Africa into one that revolves around farmer preferences and priorities.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000