Results for 'Mary W. Helms'

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  1. Reviews : Mary W. Helms, Ulysses' Sail: An Ethnographic Odyssey of Power, Knowledge, and Geographical Distance, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1988, £25.20, Paper £8.30, Xii + 297 Pp. [REVIEW]Nigel Thrift - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):294-296.
  2.  7
    Reviews: Mary W. Helms, Ulysses" Sail: An Ethnographic Odyssey of Power, Knowledge, and Geographical Distance, Princeton, Nj: Princeton University Press, 1988,? 25.20, Paper? 8.30, XII+ 297 Pp. [REVIEW]Thrift Nigel - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):294-296.
  3. Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons.Bennett W. Helm - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Love, Friendship, and the Self presents a reexamination of our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship. It argues that the individualism that is implicit in that understanding cannot be sustained if we are to understand the kind of distinctively personal intimacy that love and friendship essentially involve. For love is a matter of identifying with someone: sharing for his sake the concerns and values that make up his identity as the person (...)
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  4.  25
    Bennett W. Helm, Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of Persons, (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010), 336 Pages. ISBN: 9780199567898 (Hbk.). Hardback: £40. [REVIEW]Anabella Zagura - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):646-648.
  5.  44
    Review of Bennett W. Helm's Communities of Respect – Grounding Responsibility, Authority, and Dignity[REVIEW]Olle Blomberg - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (2):441-443.
  6.  24
    Review of Bennett W. Helm, Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of Persons[REVIEW]Erica Lucast Stonestreet - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  7. Der Doppelte Standpunkt in der Psychologie.Mary W. Calkins - 1906 - The Monist 16:480.
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  8. Die Erkenntnistheorie der Naturforschung der Gegenwart. [REVIEW]Mary W. Calkins - 1906 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 16:480.
     
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  9. The Persistent Problems of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Mary W. Calkins - 1909 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 19:158.
     
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  10.  29
    On Certain Difficulties in the Modern Doctrine of Essence.Mary W. Calkins - 1926 - Journal of Philosophy 23 (26):701-710.
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  11. CALKINS, MARY W. -A First Book in Psychology. [REVIEW]H. J. Watt - 1911 - Mind 20:577.
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  12.  11
    Role of Homophones in Transfer Learning.Mary W. Laurence - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):1.
  13.  10
    Multiple-Component Heart Rate Responses Conditioned Under Paced Respiration.Mary W. Headrick & Frances K. Graham - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):486.
  14.  15
    The Differential Influence of Identification on Ethical Judgment: The Role of Brand Love.M. Deniz Dalman, Mari W. Buche & Junhong Min - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):875-891.
    As negative information about companies becomes widely available and spreads rapidly through digital communications, understanding consumer reactions to these events and how human perceptions are shaped becomes increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate how consumers’ identification with brands and their love for them affect their support for the brand during extremely unethical situations. The results indicate that brand identification both decreases and increases consumers’ ethical judgment following extremely unethical events. Moreover, we find that consumers who are in a love (...)
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  15.  45
    Review: Love, Friendship and the Self: Intimacy, Identification and the Social Nature – Bennett W. Helm. [REVIEW]Nafsika Athanassoulis - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):662-664.
    Review of Love Friendship and the Self - Helm B.W.
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    Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of PersonsBennett W. Helm Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, Xvi + 316 Pp., $64.40. [REVIEW]Sarit Smila - 2010 - Dialogue 49 (4):652-653.
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  17. Love, Identification, and the Emotions.Bennett W. Helm - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):39--59.
    Recently there has been a resurgence of philosophical interest in love, resulting in a wide variety of accounts. Central to most accounts of love is the notion of caring about your beloved for his sake. Yet such a notion needs to be carefully articulated in the context of providing an account of love, for it is clear that the kind of caring involved in love must be carefully distinguished from impersonal modes of concern for particular others for their sakes, such (...)
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  18.  7
    The Significance of Emotions, BENNETT W. HELM.Human Flourishings - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3).
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  19.  22
    Review Benjamin E. Zeller, Marie W. Dallam, Reid L. Neilson, and Nora L. Rubel, Eds.Religion, Food, and Eating in North AmericaNew York : Columbia University Press, 2014. 336 Pp. Paperback, $35.00/£24.00, ISBN 978-0-231-16031-5 ; Cloth, $105.00/£72.50. [REVIEW]Timothy Miller - 2015 - Utopian Studies 26 (1):252-255.
  20. Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value.Bennett W. Helm - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    How can we motivate ourselves to do what we think we ought? How can we deliberate about personal values and priorities? Bennett Helm argues that standard philosophical answers to these questions presuppose a sharp distinction between cognition and conation that undermines an adequate understanding of values and their connection to motivation and deliberation. Rejecting this distinction, Helm argues that emotions are fundamental to any account of value and motivation, and he develops a detailed alternative theory both of emotions, desires and (...)
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  21. The Mary Shelley Reader: Containing Frankenstein, Mathilda, Tales and Stories, Essays and Reviews, and Letters.Mary W. Shelley - 1990 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This collection provides a complete version of Shelley's masterpiece Frankenstein as well as her short fiction and letters.
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  22.  41
    Self-Love and the Structure of Personal Values.Bennett W. Helm - 2009 - In Verena Mayer & Mikko Salmela (eds.), Emotions, Ethics, and Authenticity. John Benjamins. pp. 11--32.
    Authenticity, it is plausible to suppose, is a feature of one's identity as a person---of one's sense of the kind of life worth living. Most attempts to explicate this notion of a person's identity do so in terms of an antecedent understanding of what it is for a person to value something. This is, I argue, a mistake: a concern is not intelligible as a value apart from the place it has within a larger identity that the value serves in (...)
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  23. Emotions as Evaluative Feelings.Bennett W. Helm - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):248--55.
    The phenomenology of emotions has traditionally been understood in terms of bodily sensations they involve. This is a mistake. We should instead understand their phenomenology in terms of their distinctively evaluative intentionality. Emotions are essentially affective modes of response to the ways our circumstances come to matter to us, and so they are ways of being pleased or pained by those circumstances. Making sense of the intentionality and phenomenology of emotions in this way requires rejecting traditional understandings of intentionality and (...)
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  24. Freedom of the Heart.Bennett W. Helm - 1996 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (2):71--87.
    Philosophical accounts of freedom typically fail to capture an important kind of freedom—freedom to change what one cares about—that is central to our understanding of what it is to be a person. This paper articulates this kind of freedom more clearly, distinguishing it from freedom of action and freedom of the will, and gives an account of how it is possible. Central to this account is an understanding of the role of emotions in determining what we value, thus motivating a (...)
     
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  25. Felt Evaluations: A Theory of Pleasure and Pain.Bennett W. Helm - 2002 - American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):13-30.
    This paper argues that pleasure and pains are not qualia and they are not to be analyzed in terms of supposedly antecedently intelligible mental states like bodily sensation or desire. Rather, pleasure and pain are char- acteristic of a distinctive kind of evaluation that is common to emotions, desires, and (some) bodily sensations. These are felt evaluations: pas- sive responses to attend to and be motivated by the import of something impressing itself on us, responses that are nonetheless simultaneously con- (...)
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  26.  60
    Review: The Emotions. [REVIEW]Bennett W. Helm - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):132-135.
    Peter Goldie’s The Emotions is a fascinating account distinguished by its originality and breadth. Throughout, the account is well grounded in sound common sense, as Goldie lets his careful and sensitive interpretation of the phenomena drive his theory rather than the other way around.
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  27.  15
    Communities of Respect: Grounding Responsibility, Authority, and Dignity.Bennett W. Helm - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Communities of respect are communities of people sharing common practices or a (partial) way of life; they include families, clubs, religious groups, and political parties. This book develops a detailed account of such communities in terms of the rational structure of their members' reactive attitudes, arguing that they are fundamental in three interrelated ways to understanding what it is to be a person. First, it is only by being a member of a community of respect that one can be a (...)
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  28. Love.Bennett W. Helm - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This essay focuses on personal love, or the love of particular persons as such. Part of the philosophical task in understanding personal love is to distinguish the various kinds of personal love. For example, the way in which I love my wife is seemingly very different from the way I love my mother, my child, and my friend. This task has typically proceeded hand-in-hand with philosophical analyses of these kinds of personal love, analyses that in part respond to various puzzles (...)
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  29. Plural Agents.Bennett W. Helm - 2008 - Noûs 42 (1):17–49.
    Genuine agents are able to engage in activity because they find it worth pursuing—because they care about it. In this respect, they differ from what might be called “mere intentional systems”: systems like chess-playing computers that exhibit merely goal-directed behavior mediated by instrumental rationality, without caring. A parallel distinction can be made in the domain of social activity: plural agents must be distinguished from plural intentional systems in that plural agents have cares and engage in activity because of those cares. (...)
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  30. Emotions and Recalcitrance: Reevaluating the Perceptual Model.Bennett W. Helm - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (3):417-433.
    One central argument in favor of perceptual accounts of emotions concerns recalcitrant emotions: emotions that persist in the face of repudiating judgments. For, it is argued, to understand how the conflict between recalcitrant emotions and judgment falls short of incoherence in judgment, we need to understand recalcitrant emotions to be something like perceptual illusions of value, so that in normal, non-recalcitrant cases emotions are non-illusory perceptions of value. I argue that these arguments fail and that a closer examination of recalcitrant (...)
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  31.  21
    Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: United States of America 4 = the Robinson Collection, Baltimore, Md., 1. By David Moore Robinson, with the Assistance of Mary W. McGehee. 58 Pp., 48 Plates. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1934. $5. [REVIEW]D. B. J. - 1934 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 54 (1):89-90.
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  32.  6
    Sarah Helm, Vera Atkins, une femme de l’ombre. La résistance anglaise en France.Marie-Jo Bonnet - 2011 - Clio 33:06-06.
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  33. Friendship.Bennett W. Helm - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Friendship, as understood here, is a distinctively personal relationship that is grounded in a concern on the part of each friend for the welfare of the other, for the other's sake, and that involves some degree of intimacy. As such, friendship is undoubtedly central to our lives, in part because the special concern we have for our friends must have a place within a broader set of concerns, including moral concerns, and in part because our friends can help shape who (...)
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  34.  32
    A Reply to Mr Helm: W. D. HUDSON.W. D. Hudson - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):145-146.
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    Martin W. F. Stone Reason, Faith, and History: Essays for Paul Helm. . Pp. Xi+243. £55.00 . ISBN 978 0 7546 0926 1.Benjamin S. Cordry - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):515.
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  36.  40
    Action for the Sake of ...: Caring and the Rationality of (Social) Action.Bennett W. Helm - 2002 - Analyse & Kritik 24 (2):189--208.
    My aim is to understand at least some of the non-instrumental reasons we can have for action in a way that can provide a satisfying non-egoist account of 'social actions' - actions undertaken for the sake of others. I do this in part by presenting, in terms of a discussion of the rationality of emotions, an account of what it is for something to have import to an agent . I then extend this account to include our caring about others (...)
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  37. Significance, Emotions, and Objectivity: Some Limits of Animal Thought.Bennett W. Helm - 1994 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Rationality is the constitutive ideal of the mental. Therefore it is important to understand the sort of rationality at issue here. It is often assumed that rationality just is instrumental rationality, but this leaves us with too thin a notion of desire: Desires centrally involve the notion of things mattering or being significant, for their objects must normally be worth pursuing to the subject. Such significance is simply unintelligible in terms of instrumental rationality. Consequently, understanding significance and its rational connections (...)
     
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  38. Emotions and Practical Reason: Rethinking Evaluation and Motivation.Bennett W. Helm - 2001 - Noûs 35 (2):190–213.
    The motivational problem is the problem of understanding how we can have rational control over what we do. In the face of phenomena like weakness of the will, it is commonly thought that evaluation and reason can always remain intact even as we sever their connection with motivation; consequently, solving the motivational problem is thought to be a matter of figuring out how to bridge this inevitable gap between evaluation and motivation. I argue that this is fundamentally mistaken and results (...)
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  39.  43
    Integration and Fragmentation of the Self.Bennett W. Helm - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):43--63.
    To identify oneself with something is for it to be a source of meaning and worth in one's life. Normally such identification is constituted by a certain holistic rational pattern both in one's judgments and will and in one's emotions and desires. However, one's identity can be fragmented into conflicting sources of meaning when the pattern in one's judgments becomes disconnected from that in one's emotions. By analyzing these kinds of fragmentation, I articulate some of the rational connections there are (...)
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  40.  57
    Why We Believe in Induction: Standards of Taste and Hume's Two Definitions of Causation.Bennett W. Helm - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):117--140.
    It is somewhat striking that two interrelated elements of Hume's account of causation have received so little attention in the secondary literature on the subject. The first is the distinction of causation into the natural and the philosophical relations: Although many have tried to give accounts of why Hume presents two definitions of causality, it is often not clear in these accounts that the one definition is of causality as a natural relation and the other is of causality as a (...)
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  41.  64
    Mary Bittner Wiseman, Gary Shapiro, Michael L. Hall, Walter L. Reed, John J. Stuhr, George Poe, Bruce Krajewski, Walter Broman, Christopher McClintick, Jerome Schwartz, Roberta Davidson, Christopher Clausen, Michael Calabrese, Guy Willoughby, Don H. Bialostosky, Thomas R. Hart, Tom Conley, Michael McGaha, W. Wolfgang Holdheim, Mark Stocker, Sandra Sherman, Michael J. Weber, Sylvia Walsh, Mary Anne O'Neil, Robert Tobin, Donald M. Brown, Susan B. Brill, Oona Ajzenstat, Jeff Mitchell, Michael McClintick, Louis MacKenzie, Peter Losin, C. S. Schreiner, Walter A. Strauss, Eric J. Ziolkowski, William J. Berg, and Patrick Henry. [REVIEW]Joseph Sartorelli - 1994 - Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):354.
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  42. Emotional Reason How to Deliberate About Value.Bennett W. Helm - 2000 - American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (1):1-22.
    Deliberation about personal, non-moral values involves elements of both invention and discovery. Thus, we invent our values by freely choosing them, where such distinctively human freedom is essential to our defining and taking responsibility for the kinds of persons we are; nonetheless, we also discover our values insofar as we can deliberate about them rationally and arrive at non-arbitrary decisions about what has value in our lives. Yet these notions of invention and discovery seem inconsistent with each other, and the (...)
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  43.  5
    Guest Editorial.Mary Neal, Sara Fovargue & Stephen W. Smith - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):203-206.
    Volume 25, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 203-206.
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  44.  34
    The Significance of Emotions.Bennett W. Helm - 1994 - American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (4):319-331.
    We must distinguish between a capacity for goal-directedness of a sort found in chess-playing computers and a capacity for robust desire, which involves finding there being something in favor of the relevant course of action in light of its significance to the subject. Existing accounts of desire, especially those given in terms of instrumental rationality, either ignore or presuppose such significance, in both cases failing to give an adequate account of robust desire. My positive thesis in this paper is that (...)
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  45.  88
    Responsibility and Dignity: Strawsonian Themes.Bennett W. Helm - 2011 - In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press. pp. 217-34.
    Peter Strawson’s “Freedom and Resentment” usefully connected the concepts of freedom and responsibility with the reactive attitudes, but there has been some controversy concerning both the nature of that connection and what the reactive attitudes are. I shall argue—tentatively and speculatively—that we can best understand the reactive attitudes by seeing them as individually presupposing and jointly constituting both our respect for persons and the dignity to which that respect is responsive. Consequently, being both a proper subject and object of the (...)
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  46. Accountability and Some Social Dimensions of Human Agency.Bennett W. Helm - 2012 - Philosophical Issues 22 (1):217-232.
    What is responsible agency? I want to consider two perspectives we might take in thinking about responsibility, what we might call an inner and an outer perspective. The inner perspective is that of the agent herself, involving her having and exercising (or failing to exercise) certain agential capacities and so choosing and controlling her actions. The outer perspective is that from which we assess someone’s conduct and—crucially—her will as a matter of holding her to account. In each case, responsibility is (...)
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  47.  12
    Analyzing Marx: Morality, Power and History.Mary Gibson & Richard W. Miller - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (1):108.
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  48. Adams, Guy and Balfour, Danny (1998) Unmasking Administrative Evil, Thousand Oaks: Sage. Allen, Beverly and Russo, Mary (1997) Revisioning Italy: National Identity and Global Culture, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Bowler, Peter (1992) The Norton History of the Environmental Sciences, New York: W. [REVIEW]W. Norton, Michael P. Brown, Paul Cloke, Jo Little, Verena Andermatt Conley, Irene Diamond, Peter Dickens, Roger Gottlieb, Olavi Grano & Anssi Paasi - 1999 - Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (1).
     
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  49.  29
    An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed Through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.Mary C. Broughton & Jane W. Davidson - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  50.  43
    Reviews of Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning, Mary Midgley, 1994. London, Routledge X +256pp., Hb 04 15062713, £35; Pb 04 15107733, £8.99 Philosophical Naturalism, David Papineau, 1993 Oxford, Basil Blackwell XII +219pp., Hb 0631189025, £40; Pb 0631189033, £14.99 F. H. Bradley, Writings on Logic and Metaphysics, James W. Allard & Guy Stock , 1994. Oxford, Clarendon Press XV+357pp, Hb 0-198-24445-2, £40.00; Pb 0-198-24438-X, £14.95 Invariance and Heuristics: Essays in Honour of Heinz Post, Steven French & Harmke Kamminga , 1993 Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 148 Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht Beyond Reason: Essays on the Philosophy of Paul Feyerabend, Gonzalo Munévar , 1991. Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers XXI + 535pp., Hb, Isbn 0-7923-1272-4, £104.20 World Changes: Thomas Kuhn and the Nature of Science, Paul Horwich , 1993. Cambridge, Ma, Bradford Books/MIT Press VI + 356pp., Pb, Isbn 0262581388, £14.95 Realism Rescued: How Scientific. [REVIEW]W. Jones, James Brown, W. Mander, Wladyslaw Krajewski & John Preston - 1995 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (2):157-188.
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