38 found
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  1.  25
    Fetal Risks, Relative Risks, and Relatives' Risks.Howard Minkoff & Mary Faith Marshall - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):3-11.
    Several factors related to fetal risk render it more or less acceptable in justifying constraints on the behavior of pregnant women. Risk is an unavoidable part of pregnancy and childbirth, one that women must balance against other vital personal and family interests. Two particular issues relate to the fairness of claims that pregnant women are never entitled to put their fetuses at risk: relative risks and relatives' risks. The former have been used—often spuriously—to advance arguments against activities, such as home (...)
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  2.  4
    Restrictions on Abortion, Social Justice and the Ethics of Research in Maternal-Fetal Therapy Trials.Mary Faith Marshall, Alaia Verite & Anne D. Lyerly - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (3):78-81.
    At no time in recent decades has more attention been paid to ethical issues in pregnancy. Particularly riveting—and alarming, to many—was the passage of Senate Bill 8, a Texas law banning abortion...
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  3. Bioethics for the People by the People.Darryl R. J. Macer & Mary Faith Marshall - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (2):172-174.
     
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  4.  40
    Ethics Consultation: A Practical Guide. [REVIEW]John La Puma, David Schiedermayer & Mary Faith Marshall - 1994 - HEC Forum 6 (3):163-169.
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  5.  5
    Policing Women to Protect Fetuses: Coercive Interventions During Pregnancy.Debra A. DeBruin & Mary Faith Marshall - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 95-111.
    Women are routinely subjected to penetrating surveillance during pregnancy. On the surface, this may appear to flow from a cultural commitment to protect babies – a cultural practice of “better safe than sorry” that is particularly vigilant given the vulnerability of fetuses and babies. In reality, pregnancy occasions incursions against human rights and well-being that would be anathema in other contexts. Our cultural practices concerning risk in pregnancy are infused with oppressive norms about women’s responsibility for pregnancy outcomes and the (...)
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  6.  39
    The Barnes Case: Taking Difficult Futility Cases Public.Ruth A. Mickelsen, Daniel S. Bernstein, Mary Faith Marshall & Steven H. Miles - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):374-378.
    Futility disputes are increasing and courts are slowly abandoning their historical reluctance to engage these contentious issues, particularly when confronted with inappropriate surrogate demands for aggressive treatment. Use of the judicial system to resolve futility disputes inevitably brings media attention and requires clinicians, hospitals, and families to debate these deep moral conflicts in the public eye. A recent case in Minnesota, In re Emergency Guardianship of Albert Barnes, explores this emerging trend and the complex responsibilities of clinicians and hospital administrators (...)
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  7.  5
    Who Will Receive the Last Ventilator: Why COVID-19 Policies Should Not Prioritise Healthcare Workers.Donna T. Chen, Lois Shepherd, Jordan Taylor & Mary Faith Marshall - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (9):599-602.
    Policies promoted and adopted for allocating ventilators during the COVID-19 pandemic have often prioritised healthcare workers or other essential workers. While the need for such policies has so far been largely averted, renewed stress on health systems from continuing surges, as well as the experience of allocating another scarce resource—vaccination—counsel revisiting the justifications for such prioritisation. Prioritising healthcare workers may have intuitive appeal, but the ethical justifications for doing so and the potential harms that could follow require careful analysis. Ethical (...)
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  8.  11
    The Barnes Case: Taking Difficult Futility Cases Public.Ruth A. Mickelsen, Daniel S. Bernstein, Mary Faith Marshall & Steven H. Miles - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):374-378.
    The recent Minnesota case of In re Emergency Guardianship of Albert Barnes illustrates an emerging class of cases where a dispute between a family proxy and a hospital over “medical futility” requires legal resolution. The case was further complicated by the patient’s spouse who fraudulently claimed to be the patient’s designated health care proxy and who misrepresented the patient’s previously expressed treatment preferences. Barnes demonstrates the degree of significant administrative and institutional support to the health care team, ethics consultants, and (...)
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  9.  10
    Is Broader Better?Elizabeth G. Epstein, Ashley R. Hurst, Dea Mahanes, Mary Faith Marshall & Ann B. Hamric - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):15-17.
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  10.  4
    Effect of a Moral Distress Consultation Service on Moral Distress, Empowerment, and a Healthy Work Environment.Elizabeth G. Epstein, Ruhee Shah & Mary Faith Marshall - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-15.
    Background: Healthcare providers who are accountable for patient care safety and quality but who are not empowered to actualize them experience moral distress. Interventions to mitigate moral distress in the healthcare organization are needed. Objective: To evaluate the effect on moral distress and clinician empowerment of an established, health-system-wide intervention, Moral Distress Consultation. Methods: A quasi-experimental, mixed methods study using pre/post surveys, structured interviews, and evaluation of consult themes was used. Consults were requested by staff when moral distress was present. (...)
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  11.  40
    Government-Scripted Consent: When Medical Ethics and Law Collide.Howard Minkoff & Mary Faith Marshall - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (5):21-23.
  12.  15
    What the “F”?Donna Chen, Elizabeth Epstein, Susan Almarode, Jameel Winter & Mary Faith Marshall - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):16-19.
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  13.  10
    A Decision Made Well.Julia F. Taylor & Mary Faith Marshall - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (3):18-19.
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  14.  20
    The Paradigm of the Paradox: Women, Pregnant Women, and the Unequal Burdens of the Zika Virus Pandemic.Lisa H. Harris, Neil S. Silverman & Mary Faith Marshall - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (5):1-4.
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  15.  39
    Substance Abuse During Pregnancy: Clinical and Public Health Approaches.Philip H. Jos, Martin Perlmutter & Mary Faith Marshall - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):340-350.
    The treatment of pregnant women addicted to drugs provides an especially important and illustrative example of how political and popular demands can successfully challenge professional ethical norms associated with clinical medicine — norms such as confidentiality, patient autonomy, and the right to consent to and to refuse treatment. One increasingly popular policy approach is to limit patient autonomy by coercing women in an attempt to change their behavior, either by involuntary civil commitment or by imprisoning them for drug abuse or (...)
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  16.  14
    Moral Hazard and Moral Distress: A Marriage Made in Purgatory.Mary Faith Marshall & Elizabeth G. Epstein - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):46-48.
  17. ""Taking the" I" Out of IRB-And Putting" Community" In.Mary Faith Marshall - 2000 - Bioethics Forum 16:7-12.
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  18. Implementing Policy to the Wider Community.Mary Faith Marshall & Joan Liaschenko - 2012 - In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  19.  34
    The Charleston Policy on Cocaine Use During Pregnancy: A Cautionary Tale.Philip H. Jos, Mary Faith Marshall & Martin Perlmutter - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):120-128.
    The conflict between pregnant women freely using cocaine and the well-being of fetuses presents a difficult social problem. Since 1985, at least 200 women, in thirty states, have been criminally prosecuted for using illicit drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. Such policies enjoy considerable public and political support. Nonetheless, treatment programs that include referral to law enforcement officials raise serious ethical and legal issues for hospitals and health care providers. In this paper, we assess the development of one medical university's controversial (...)
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  20.  11
    Substance Abuse During Pregnancy: Clinical and Public Health Approaches.Philip H. Jos, Martin Perlmutter & Mary Faith Marshall - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):340-350.
    The treatment of pregnant women addicted to drugs provides an especially important and illustrative example of how political and popular demands can successfully challenge professional ethical norms associated with clinical medicine — norms such as confidentiality, patient autonomy, and the right to consent to and to refuse treatment. One increasingly popular policy approach is to limit patient autonomy by coercing women in an attempt to change their behavior, either by involuntary civil commitment or by imprisoning them for drug abuse or (...)
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  21.  12
    The Charleston Policy on Cocaine Use During Pregnancy: A Cautionary Tale.Philip H. Jos, Mary Faith Marshall & Martin Perlmutter - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):120-128.
    The conflict between pregnant women freely using cocaine and the well-being of fetuses presents a difficult social problem. Since 1985, at least 200 women, in thirty states, have been criminally prosecuted for using illicit drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. Such policies enjoy considerable public and political support. Nonetheless, treatment programs that include referral to law enforcement officials raise serious ethical and legal issues for hospitals and health care providers. In this paper, we assess the development of one medical university's controversial (...)
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  22.  1
    An Incautious Tale of Biomedical Ethics, Abortion Politics and Political Expediency.Mary Faith Marshall - 2016 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 6 (1):28-31.
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  23.  9
    Vulnerable Subjects and Civic Professionalism: Would Six-Sigma Research and Research Ethics Consultation Solve the Vulnerability Problem?Mary Faith Marshall - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):54-55.
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  24.  47
    Raymond G. De Vries is a Professor At.Elizabeth M. Fenton, Kyle L. Galbraith, Susan Dorr Goold, Elisa J. Gordon, Lawrence O. Gostin, Hilde Lindemann, Anna C. Mastroianni, Mary Faith Marshall, Howard Minkoff & Joshua E. Perry - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  25. ASBH and Moral Tolerance.Mary Faith Marshall - 2007 - In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  26.  19
    Narrative Symposium: Political Influence on Bioethical Deliberation.Jean–Christophe Bélisle Pipon, Marie–Ève Lemoine, Maude Laliberté, Bryn Williams–Jones, Dan Bustillos, Anonymous One, Anonymous Two, Ashley K. Fernandes, Anonymous Three, Thomas D. Harter, D. Micah Hester, Anonymous Four, Mary Faith Marshall, Philip M. Rosoff & Giles R. Scofield - 2016 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 6 (1):3-36.
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  27.  11
    The Two-Patient Framework for Research During Pregnancy: A Critique and a Better Way Forward.Mary Faith Marshall, Debra DeBruin & Joan Liaschenko - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):66-68.
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  28.  1
    The Case of Hannah Capes: How Much Does Consciousness Matter?Lois Shepherd, C. William Pike, Jesse B. Persily & Mary Faith Marshall - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-16.
    A recent legal case involving an ambiguous diagnosis in a woman with a severe disorder of consciousness raises pressing questions about treatment withdrawal in a time when much of what experts know about disorders of consciousness is undergoing revision and refinement. How much should diagnostic certainty about consciousness matter? For the judge who refused to allow withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration, it was dispositive. Rather than relying on substituted judgment or best interests to determine treatment decisions, he ruled that (...)
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  29.  27
    What Really Happened: A Tribute to John C. Fletcher.Mary Faith Marshall - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):W3-W5.
    John C. Fletcher, a pioneer in the field of bioethics and friend and mentor to many generations of bioethicists, died tragically on May 27th at the age of 72. The son of an Episcopal priest from Bryan, TX, Fletcher graduated in 1953 with a degree in English Literature from the University of the South in Sewanee, TN. After completing a Masters in Divinity degree from the Virginia Theological Seminary and a stint as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Heidelberg (...)
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  30.  58
    The Placebo Effect in Popular Culture.Mary Faith Marshall - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):37-42.
    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O’Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved over time.
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  31.  13
    Reply to Whittemore and Good.Mary Faith Marshall, Philip H. Jos & Martin Perlmutter - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (3):299-300.
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  32.  15
    Reply to Whittemore and Good.Mary Faith Marshall, Philip H. Jos & Martin Perlmutter - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (3):299-300.
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  33.  22
    Refusal of Treatment by an Adolescent: The Deliverances of Different Consciences. [REVIEW]Sally L. Webb, Mary Faith Marshall, Flint Boettcher & Marty Perlmutter - 1998 - HEC Forum 10 (1):9-23.
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  34.  11
    Dax’s Case Redux: When Comes the End of the Day?Ashley R. Hurst, Dea Mahanes & Mary Faith Marshall - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (2):171-177.
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  35.  16
    To the Editor.Debra DeBruin, Joan Liaschenko & Mary Faith Marshall - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (4):5-6.
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  36.  5
    Blanket Bans on Therapeutic Abortion and the Responsibilities of Hospitals as Moral Communities.Lois Shepherd & Mary Faith Marshall - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):55-57.
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  37.  7
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Fetal Risks, Relative Risks, and Relatives' Risks”.Howard Minkoff & Mary Faith Marshall - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):13-13.
    Several factors related to fetal risk render it more or less acceptable in justifying constraints on the behavior of pregnant women. Risk is an unavoidable part of pregnancy and childbirth, one that women must balance against other vital personal and family interests. Two particular issues relate to the fairness of claims that pregnant women are never entitled to put their fetuses at risk: relative risks and relatives' risks. The former have been used—often spuriously—to advance arguments against activities, such as home (...)
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  38.  1
    A Man of Vision: Daniel Callahan on the Nasty Problem and the Noxious Brew.Mary Faith Marshall - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):9-10.
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