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  1.  13
    Mutatis mutandis … On Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia in the Netherlands.Martin Buijsen - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):40-53.
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are common practice in the Netherlands. In response to increasing requests from patients to end their lives, physicians are finding themselves placed in particularly precarious situations because of advance directives written by patients suffering from severe dementia. In April 2020, the Supreme Court of the Netherlands issued two judgments in the so-called Dormicum case: a case involving the deliberate termination of the life of a 74-year-old woman suffering from advanced dementia by a geriatrician in a nursing (...)
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  2.  26
    A Life Fulfilled: Should There Be Assisted Suicide for Those Who Are Done with Living?Martin Buijsen - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (3):366-375.
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  3.  62
    Autonomy, Human Dignity, and the Right to Healthcare: A Dutch Perspective.Martin Buijsen - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):321-328.
    Dutch medical ethics policy is renowned for being highly liberal, due largely to the Dutch law on euthanasia. The Netherlands is one of the very few countries in which euthanasia performed by physicians and physician-assisted suicide has been legalized. Acts of euthanasia and PAS go unpunished, provided certain conditions are fulfilled.
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  4.  6
    And What About the Pharmacist?Martin Buijsen & Wilma Göttgens - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):375-385.
    In the Netherlands, euthanasia has been decriminalized. Termination of life on request and assisted suicide are criminal offences under Dutch law; but if physicians comply with the due care requirements of the Euthanasia Act and report their actions in the manner prescribed by law, they will not be prosecuted. One of the requirements relates to the act of euthanasia itself. If this is to be performed with due medical care, the physician relies on the services of a pharmacist. However, the (...)
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  5.  14
    Healthcare professionals’ dilemmas: judging patient’s decision making competence in day-to-day care of patients suffering from Korsakoff’s syndrome.Susanne van den Hooff & Martin Buijsen - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):633-640.
    Patient’s decision making competence is a widely discussed subject. Issues of competence, autonomy, well-being and protection of the patient come up every day. In this article we analyse what role PDMC plays in Dutch legislation and what dilemmas healthcare professionals may experience, notably in patients suffering from Korsakoff’s syndrome. Dilemmas emerge if professionals want to meet the requirements mentioned in Dutch law and the desires of their patients. The autonomy of the patient and the healthcare professionals’ duty to take care (...)
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  6.  9
    Commentary on Rissfeldt: The Small Matter of the Doctor’s Autonomy.Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):263-269.
    In his article, Thomas Rissfeldt argues the compatibility of palliative care with euthanasia and assisted suicide.1 By his account, many working within the field of palliative care feel that euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are incompatible with palliative care. Wrongly, according to the author, since (1) the aims of palliative care and euthanasia/assisted suicide are not different, (2) euthanasia and assisted suicide are compatible with the fundamental role of the physician as healer, and (3) euthanasia and assisted suicide do not necessarily (...)
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  7.  11
    Commentary: Whose suffering?Martin Buijsen - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):346-353.
    Marije Brouwer et al. contend that collecting treatment experiences of newborns with life-threatening conditions can support both caregivers and parents in making difficult end-of-life decisions. They illustrate the importance of that understanding by narrating the heartbreaking story of the sisters Roos and Noor, two newborns in the last stage of their lives.1.
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  8. De bijzondere morele status van gezondheidszorg Over marktwerking, gelijke behandeling en de noodzaak van zeggenschap.Martin Buijsen - 2010 - Filosofie En Praktijk 31 (3):51.
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  9.  3
    Euthanasia for the Elderly: Multiple Geriatric Syndromes and Unbearable Suffering According to Dutch Euthanasia Review Committees.Martin Buijsen - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-8.
    The public debate on voluntary termination of life by elderly people, which has been an intensely controversial subject in the Netherlands for some time, has centered around the issue of “completed life” in recent years. In 2016, an ad hoc governmental advisory committee concluded that the already existing Euthanasia Act provided sufficient scope to resolve most of the problems related to the issue. Most of the older adults who feel they no longer have anything to look forward to in their (...)
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  10.  11
    On Interpretation and Appreciation. A European Human Rights Perspective on Dobbs.Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (3):323-336.
    In June 2022, the Supreme Court of the United States overturned Roe v. Wade. The European Court of Human Rights is also expected to decide on several abortion cases. In this paper, the interpretative approaches of both courts are compared. Whereas the U.S. Supreme Court in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decided on an originalist approach to the Constitution, the highest European court has always regarded the European Convention on Human Rights as a living instrument. As a result, domestic (...)
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  11.  9
    Mobile Health in China: Well Integrated or a New Divide?Lujia Sun & Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):244-253.
    The application of mobile health holds promises of achieving greater accessibility in the evolving health care sector. The active engagement of private actors drives its growth, while the challenges that exist between health care privatization and equitable access are a concern. This article selects the private internet hospital in China as a case study. It indicates that a market-oriented regulatory mechanism of private mobile health will contribute little to improving health equity from the perspectives of egalitarians and libertarians. By integrating (...)
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  12.  7
    Should the Dutch Law on Euthanasia Be Expanded to Include Children?A. A. E. Verhagen & Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):5-13.
    The 2002 Dutch Euthanasia law applies to patients aged 12 years and older. Developments in end-of-life care and decision-making in the last decade have sparked the debate about usefulness and necessity to extend euthanasia to include children under 12 years of age. This paper describes two opposite positions: the affirmative position of a pediatrician and expert in pediatric palliative care and the negative position of a jurist and specialist in health law.
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