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Martha W. Alibali [10]Martha Wagner Alibali [5]
  1.  24
    How do gestures influence thinking and speaking? The gesture-for-conceptualization hypothesis.Sotaro Kita, Martha W. Alibali & Mingyuan Chu - 2017 - Psychological Review 124 (3):245-266.
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  2.  21
    Transitions in concept acquisition: Using the hand to read the mind.Susan Goldin-Meadow, Martha Wagner Alibali & R. Breckinridge Church - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (2):279-297.
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  3.  55
    Trade‐Offs Between Grounded and Abstract Representations: Evidence From Algebra Problem Solving.Kenneth R. Koedinger, Martha W. Alibali & Mitchell J. Nathan - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):366-397.
    This article explores the complementary strengths and weaknesses of grounded and abstract representations in the domain of early algebra. Abstract representations, such as algebraic symbols, are concise and easy to manipulate but are distanced from any physical referents. Grounded representations, such as verbal descriptions of situations, are more concrete and familiar, and they are more similar to physical objects and everyday experience. The complementary computational characteristics of grounded and abstract representations lead to trade‐offs in problem‐solving performance. In prior research with (...)
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  4.  40
    You'll see what you mean: Students encode equations based on their knowledge of arithmetic.Nicole M. McNeil & Martha W. Alibali - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (3):451-466.
    This study investigated the roles of problem structure and strategy use in problem encoding. Fourth‐grade students solved and explained a set of typical addition problems (e.g., 5 + 4 + 9 + 5 = _) and mathematical equivalence problems (e.g., 4 + 3 + 6 = 4 + _ or 6 + 4 + 5 = _ + 5). Next, they completed an encoding task in which they reconstructed addition and equivalence problems after viewing each for 5 s. Equivalence problems (...)
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  5.  20
    Leave Her out of It: Person‐Presentation of Strategies is Harmful for Transfer.Anne E. Riggs, Martha W. Alibali & Charles W. Kalish - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1965-1978.
    A common practice in textbooks is to introduce concepts or strategies in association with specific people. This practice aligns with research suggesting that using “real-world” contexts in textbooks increases students’ motivation and engagement. However, other research suggests this practice may interfere with transfer by distracting students or leading them to tie new knowledge too closely to the original learning context. The current study investigates the effects on learning and transfer of connecting mathematics strategies to specific people. A total of 180 (...)
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  6.  29
    Solving Inductive Reasoning Problems in Mathematics: Not‐so‐Trivial Pursuit.Lisa A. Haverty, Kenneth R. Koedinger, David Klahr & Martha W. Alibali - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (2):249-298.
    This study investigated the cognitive processes involved in inductive reasoning. Sixteen undergraduates solved quadratic function–finding problems and provided concurrent verbal protocols. Three fundamental areas of inductive activity were identified: Data Gathering, Pattern Finding, and Hypothesis Generation. These activities are evident in three different strategies that they used to successfully find functions. In all three strategies, Pattern Finding played a critical role not previously identified in the literature. In the most common strategy, called the Pursuit strategy, participants created new quantities from (...)
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  7.  15
    Understanding and Using Principles of Arithmetic: Operations Involving Negative Numbers.Richard W. Prather & Martha W. Alibali - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):445-457.
    Previous work has investigated adults' knowledge of principles for arithmetic with positive numbers (Dixon, Deets, & Bangert, 2001). The current study extends this past work to address adults' knowledge of principles of arithmetic with a negative number, and also investigates links between knowledge of principles and problem representation. Participants (N = 44) completed two tasks. In the Evaluation task, participants rated how well sets of equations were solved. Some sets violated principles of arithmetic and others did not. Participants rated non‐violation (...)
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  8.  19
    Property content guides children’s memory for social learning episodes.Anne E. Riggs, Charles W. Kalish & Martha W. Alibali - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):243-253.
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  9.  27
    Mimicry and simulation in gesture comprehension.Martha W. Alibali & Autumn B. Hostetter - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):433-434.
    According to the SIMS model, mimicry and simulation contribute to perceivers' understanding of smiles. We argue that similar mechanisms are involved in comprehending the hand gestures that people produce when speaking. Viewing gestures may elicit overt mimicry, or may evoke corresponding simulations in the minds of addressees. These real or simulated actions contribute to addressees' comprehension of speakers' gestures.
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  10.  74
    The developmental progression from implicit to explicit knowledge: A computational approach.Martha Wagner Alibali & Kenneth R. Koedinger - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):755-756.
    Dienes & Perner (D&P) argue that nondeclarative knowledge can take multiple forms. We provide empirical support for this from two related lines of research about the development of mathematical reasoning. We then describe how different forms of procedural and declarative knowledge can be effectively modeled in Anderson's ACT-R theory, contrasting this computational approach with D&P's logical approach. The computational approach suggests that the commonly observed developmental progression from more implicit to more explicit knowledge can be viewed as a consequence of (...)
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  11.  19
    What makes children change their minds? Changes in problem encoding lead to changes in strategy selection.Martha Wagner Alibali, Nicole M. McNeil & Michael A. Perrott - 1998 - In M. A. Gernsbacher & S. J. Derry (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawerence Erlbaum.
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  12.  41
    Does the hand reflect implicit knowledge? Yes and no.Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):766-767.
    Gesture does not have a fixed position in the Dienes & Perner framework. Its status depends on the way knowledge is expressed. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be fully implicit (neither factuality nor predication is explicit) if the goal is simply to move a pointing hand to a target. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be explicit (both factuality and predication are explicit) if the goal is to indicate an object. However, gesture is not restricted to these two extreme positions. When (...)
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  13.  37
    Do you have to be right to redescribe?Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):718-719.
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  14.  7
    Some Correct Strategies Are Better Than Others: Individual Differences in Strategy Evaluations Are Related to Strategy Adoption.David Menendez, Sarah A. Brown & Martha W. Alibali - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (3):e13269.
    Why do people shift their strategies for solving problems? Past work has focused on the roles of contextual and individual factors in explaining whether people adopt new strategies when they are exposed to them. In this study, we examined a factor not considered in prior work: people's evaluations of the strategies themselves. We presented undergraduate participants from a moderately selective university (N = 252; 64.8% women, 65.6% White, 67.6% who had taken calculus) with two strategies for solving algebraic word problems (...)
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  15.  28
    A sad thumbs up: incongruent gestures and disrupted sensorimotor activity both slow processing of facial expressions.Adrienne Wood, Jared D. Martin, Martha W. Alibali & Paula M. Niedenthal - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (6):1196-1209.
    ABSTRACTRecognising a facial expression is more difficult when the expresser's body conveys incongruent affect. Existing research has documented such interference for universally recognisable bodil...
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