Results for 'Martha J. Shrubsole'

961 found
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  1.  46
    Parents’ attitudes toward consent and data sharing in biobanks: A multisite experimental survey.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, Kyle B. Brothers, John A. Myers, Yana B. Feygin, Sharon A. Aufox, Murray H. Brilliant, Pat Conway, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Carol R. Horowitz, Gail P. Jarvik, Rongling Li, Evette J. Ludman, Catherine A. McCarty, Jennifer B. McCormick, Nathaniel D. Mercaldo, Melanie F. Myers, Saskia C. Sanderson, Martha J. Shrubsole, Jonathan S. Schildcrout, Janet L. Williams, Maureen E. Smith, Ellen Wright Clayton & Ingrid A. Holm - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):128-142.
  2. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
    Visual Agnosia is a comprehensive and up-to-date review of disorders of higher vision that relates these disorders to current conceptions of higher vision from cognitive science, illuminating both the neuropsychological disorders and the nature of normal visual object recognition.Brain damage can lead to selective problems with visual perception, including visual agnosia the inability to recognize objects even though elementary visual functions remain unimpaired. Such disorders are relatively rare, yet they provide a window onto how the normal brain might accomplish the (...)
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  3.  40
    Dissociated overt and covert recognition as an emergent property of a lesioned neural network.Martha J. Farah, Randall C. O'Reilly & Shaun P. Vecera - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (4):571-588.
  4.  46
    Neuropsychological inference with an interactive brain: A critique of the “locality” assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):43-61.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  5.  8
    Neuropsychological inference with an interactive brain: A critique of the “locality” assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):90-100.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  6.  24
    What is "special" about face perception?Martha J. Farah, Kevin D. Wilson, Maxwell Drain & James N. Tanaka - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (3):482-498.
  7. Personhood and neuroscience: Naturalizing or nihilating?Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):37-48.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
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  8.  41
    The neurological basis of mental imagery: A componential analysis.Martha J. Farah - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):245-272.
  9.  36
    Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah & Paul Root Wolpe - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):35-45.
    The eye may be window to the soul, but neuroscientists aim to get inside and measure the interior directly. There's also talk about moving some walls.
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  10.  95
    Is visual imagery really visual: Some overlooked evidence from neuropsychology.Martha J. Farah - 1988 - Psychological Review 95 (3):307-17.
  11.  36
    Visual perception and visual awareness after brain damage: A tutorial overview.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Carlo Umilta & Morris Moscovitch (eds.), Consciousness and Unconscious Information Processing: Attention and Performance 15. MIT Press. pp. 203--236.
  12.  33
    Modern Water Ethics: Implications for Shared Governance.Jeremy J. Schmidt & Dan Shrubsole - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (3):359-379.
    It has been suggested that water and social values were divorced in modernity. This paper argues otherwise. First, it demonstrates the historical link between ethics and politics using the case of American water governance. It engages theories regarding state-centric water planning under ‘high modernism’ and the claim that water was seen as a neutral resource that could be objectively governed. By developing an alternate view from the writings of early American water leaders, J.W. Powell and W.J. McGee, the paper offers (...)
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  13.  74
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision.Martha J. Farah - 2000 - Blackwell.
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision begins by introducing the reader to the anatomy of the eye and visual cortex and then proceeds to discuss image and...
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  14. African Gold from a Pirate Shipwreck.Martha J. Ehrlich - 1991 - Minerva 2 (1):24-9.
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  15.  19
    Unconscious perception of "extinguished" visual stimuli: Reassessing the evidence.Martha J. Farah, M. A. Monheit & M. A. Wallace - 1991 - Neuropsychologia 29:949-58.
  16.  23
    Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater: Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging.Martha J. Farah - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s2):19-30.
    Since the mid‐1980s, psychologists and neuroscientists have used brain imaging to test hypotheses about human thought processes and their neural instantiation. In just three decades, functional neuroimaging has been transformed from a crude clinical tool to a widely used research method for understanding the human brain and mind. Such rapidly achieved success is bound to evoke skepticism. A degree of skepticism toward new methods and ideas is both inevitable and useful in any field. It is especially valuable in a science (...)
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  17.  21
    Mental rotation and orientation-invariant object recognition: Dissociable processes.Martha J. Farah & Katherine M. Hammond - 1988 - Cognition 29 (1):29-46.
  18.  12
    Community, Diversity, and Marginalization: An Ecological Construction of Immigrant Parenting within the U.S. Neoliberal Home and School Contexts.Martha J. Strickland & Elena Lyutykh - 2020 - Educational Studies 56 (3):286-305.
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  19. Protecting the Options of Future Generations.Martha J. Garrett - 1999 - In Tʻae-chʻang Kim & James Allen Dator (eds.), Co-Creating a Public Philosophy for Future Generations. Praeger. pp. 32.
  20. Inequality in postsecondary education.Martha J. Bailey & Susan M. Dynarski - 2011 - In Greg J. Duncan & Richard J. Murnane (eds.), Whither Opportunity. Russell Sage. pp. 117--132.
     
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  21.  2
    The Significance of Finding a Witness in Liberatory Education.Martha J. Ritter - 2007 - Philosophy of Education 63:359-366.
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  22.  36
    The Touching Test: AI and the Future of Human Intimacy.Martha J. Reineke - 2022 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 29 (1):123-146.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Touching TestAI and the Future of Human IntimacyMartha J. Reineke (bio)Each Friday, the New York Times publishes Love Letters, a compendium of articles on courtship. A recent story featured Melinda, a real estate agent, and Calvin, a human resources director.1 They had met at a market deli counter. On their first date, a lasagna dinner at Melinda's home, Calvin posed the question, "What are you looking for in (...)
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  23.  14
    Structure and Strategy in Image Generation.Martha J. Farah & Stephen M. Kosslyn - 1981 - Cognitive Science 5 (4):371-383.
    Two experiments were conducted to test a prediction of the Kosslyn & Shwartz computer simulation model of mental image processing. According to this model, more complex images require more time to form because parts are placed sequentially, and larger images require more time to form than smaller ones because more parts are placed. If these accounts are correct, then the advantage of forming a small image (i.e., one that seems to subtend a smaller visual angle) should be greater for more (...)
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  24.  6
    The View from Pȏle Nord.Martha J. Reineke - 2023 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 30 (1):1-27.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The View from Pȏle NordSartre, Beauvoir, and Girard on Mimesis, Embodiment, and DesireMartha J. Reineke (bio)Simone Beauvoir's novel She Came to Stay immerses readers in a 1930s Parisian social scene, thanks in part to the character Françoise. Eavesdropping with Françoise on a man and woman seated at a table in the Pȏle Nord café, readers of the novel hear the woman confide, "I've never been able to follow the (...)
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  25.  33
    After the Scapegoat.Martha J. Reineke - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (2):141-153.
  26.  18
    After the Scapegoat.Martha J. Reineke - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (2):141-153.
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  27.  40
    In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens.Martha J. Reineke - 1988 - Philosophy and Theology 2 (3):277-299.
    In this essay I offer a criticism of David Tracy’s work, The Analogical Imagination, in Iight of my reading of Alice Walker’s fiction. I propose that Tracy’s analysis of the contemporary theological scene is flawed because his portrait of theology bypasses important aspects of liberation theology. In particular, I suggest that despite Tracy’s rccognition of liberation theology, his work is imperiled by a residue of privilege that clings to his hermeneutic model of theology. As a consequence, opportunities for substantive dialogue (...)
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  28.  10
    The Broken Thread: Cervantes, Don Quijote, and War Trauma.Martha J. Reineke - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):65-108.
    Miguel de Cervantes was taken captive in Algiers after the Battle of Lepanto and spent 5 years in prison.1 In his writings thereafter, recurring images and references to humans in captivity—cages, bondage, beatings—suggest that Cervantes remained haunted by his imprisonment. As Maria Antonia Garcés argues in Cervantes in Algiers: A Captive's Tale, Cervantes's writings allude to an "afterlife of trauma" that should be part of any analysis of his writings, including Don Quijote.2 Indeed, Garcés contends that, three centuries before Freud, (...)
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  29.  35
    Transforming Space: Creativity, Destruction, and Mimesis in Winnicott and Girard.Martha J. Reineke - 2007 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 14 (1):79-95.
  30.  49
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?": Getting Personal.Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):1-4.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
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  31.  12
    Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.) - 2000 - MIT Press.
    The cognitive disorders that follow brain damage are an important source of insights into the neural bases of human thought. This work offers state-of-the-art reviews of the patient-based approach to central issues in cognitive neuroscience by leaders in the field.
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  32.  91
    Socioeconomic status and the developing brain.Daniel A. Hackman & Martha J. Farah - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):65.
  33.  58
    Consciousness of perception after brain damage.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 1997 - Seminars in Neurology 17:145-52.
  34.  10
    Orientation Invariance and Geometric Primitives in Shape Recognition.Martha J. Farah, Robin Rochlin & Karen L. Klein - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (2):325-344.
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  35.  47
    Perception and awareness after brain damage.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:252-55.
  36. Consciousness.Martha J. Farah - 2001 - In B. Rapp (ed.), The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology: What Deficits Reveal About the Human Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
     
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  37.  8
    Checking in with Neuroethics.Martha J. Farah - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):3-3.
    Like people, academic fields grow, acquire an identity, establish goals, and ultimately impact the world in various ways. Here we check in with our young friend Neuroethics—a field I want to see develop and thrive. This won't happen if it keeps returning to issues like cognitive enhancement or neural causation of behavior and responsibility, with minor adjustments of its analyses. Neuroethics is at its best when scanning the horizon for new scientific and technical developments that intersect in new ways with (...)
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  38.  9
    Disorders of.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 143.
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  39. Disorders of perception and awareness.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press.
     
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  40.  33
    Is consciousness of perception really separable from perception?Martha J. Farah - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):254-255.
    Although not the main point of his target article, Block defends the view that perception and awareness of perception could be functions of different brain systems. I will argue that the available data do not support this view, and that Block's defense of the view rests on problematic eonstruals of the “executive system” and of the components of information-processing models.
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  41.  15
    Interactions on the interactive brain.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):90-104.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  42.  16
    More interactions on the interactive brain.Martha J. Farah - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):521-523.
    The central claim of my original target article was a modest one (that modularity does not always hold) but it was misinterpreted as a much stronger one (that modularity never holds). Further confusions arose from multiple valid usages of the term and the similarity of the terms and Despite the limited nature of the claim, I maintain that it poses a stubborn problem for neuropsychology, not to be dispelled by new empirical methods or a priori reasoning.
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  43. Poverty, privilege and brain development: empirical findings and ethical implications.Martha J. Farah, Kimberly G. Noble & Hallam Hurt - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
  44. Poverty, privilege and the developing brain: empirical findings and ethical implications.Martha J. Farah, Kimberly G. Noble & Hurt & H. - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
  45.  16
    Semantic memory.Martha J. Farah & Murray Grossman - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 301.
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  46. Specialization within visual object recognition: Clues from prosopagnosia and alexia.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.), The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 133--146.
     
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  47.  24
    The distributed pineal gland.Martha J. Farah - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):209-209.
  48. The neural correlates of perceptual awareness: Evidence from Covert recognition in prosopagnosia.Martha J. Farah, R. C. O'Reilly & Shaun P. Vecera - 1997 - In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  49.  30
    Neuropsychology of High Level Vision: Collected Tutorial Essays : Carnegie Mellon Symposium on Cognition : Papers.Martha J. Farah & Graham Ratcliff (eds.) - 1994 - Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain.
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  50.  19
    Visual object agnosia.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 117--122.
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