4 found
Order:
  1.  75
    Of the Origin of the Work of Art.Martin Heidegger & Markus Zisselsberger - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):329-347.
  2.  32
    On Jean Améry: Philosophy of Catastrophe.Magdalena Zolkos, J. M. Bernstein, Roy Ben-Shai, Thomas Brudholm, Arne Grøn, Dennis B. Klein, Kitty J. Millet, Joseph Rosen, Philipa Rothfield, Melanie Steiner Sherwood, Wolfgang Treitler, Aleksandra Ubertowska, Michael Ure, Anna Yeatman & Markus Zisselsberger - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    This volume offers the first English language collection of academic essays on the post-Holocaust thought of Jean Améry, a Jewish-Austrian-Belgian essayist, journalist and literary author. Comprehensive in scope and multi-disciplinary in orientation, contributors explore central aspects of Améry's philosophical and ethical position, including dignity, responsibility, resentment, and forgiveness.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  27
    The Claim and Use of Language in Translation: Heidegger (and) Übersetzen.Markus Zisselsberger - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):313-328.
    Starting from the premise that what calls for and happens in the work and thinking of translation is inseparable from the experience of reading Heidegger’sphilosophy, this article suggests that translation in Heidegger’s work is a philosophical problem fundamentally implicated in the thinking of Being. The article first examines Heidegger’s distinction between Übersetzen—a form of translation that seeks correspondences between words of different languages, and Übersetzen—a translation within one’s own language that seeks to respond to the “claim” of language itself. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Historical-Critical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mythology.Mason Richey & Markus Zisselsberger (eds.) - 2007 - State University of New York Press.
    _Appearing in English for the first time, Schelling’s 1842 lectures develop the idea that many philosophical concepts are born of religious-mythological notions._.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation