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Mark T. Mitchell [9]Mark Thomas Mitchell [1]
  1.  27
    Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing.Mark T. Mitchell - 2006 - Intercollegiate Studies Institute.
    The polymath Michael Polanyi first made his mark as a physical chemist, but his interests gradually shifted to economics, politics, and philosophy, in which field he would ultimately propose a revolutionary theory of knowledge that grew out of his firsthand experience with both the scientific method and political totalitarianism. In this sixth entry in ISI Books’ Library of Modern Thinkers’ series, Mark T. Mitchell reveals how Polanyi came to recognize that the roots of the modern political and spiritual crisis lay (...)
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  2.  87
    Michael Polanyi and Michael Oakeshott: Common Ground, Uncommon Foundations.Mark T. Mitchell - 2001 - Tradition and Discovery 28 (2):23-34.
    This paper examines the work of Michael Oakeshott in relation to that of Polanyi. While there are important similarities that Oakeshott himself recognized, their fundamentally different conceptions of reality—Polanyi ‘s realism and Oakeshott’s idealism—ultimately serve to highlight important distinctions between these two thinkers.
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  3.  65
    A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell’s Michael Polanyi.Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell - 2007 - Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  4.  48
    Personal Participation: Michael Polanyi, Eric Voegelin, and the Indispensability of Faith.Mark T. Mitchell - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):65-89.
    In this paper I focus on the central role faith plays in the thought of Polanyi and Voegelin. I begin by indicating how both find the modern conception of scientific knowing seriously wanting. What Polanyi terms "objectivism" and Voegelin calls "scientism" is the modern tendency to reduce knowledge to only that which can be scientifically demonstrated. This errant view of knowledge does not occur in a vacuum, though, and both men draw a connection between this and the political pathologies of (...)
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  5. Power and Purity: The Unholy Marriage That Spawned America's Social Justice Warriors.Mark T. Mitchell - 2020 - Washington, DC: Regnery Gateway.
    A Marriage Made in Hell Where did they come from, these furiously self-righteous “social justice warriors”? The growing radicalism and intolerance on the American left is the result of the strange union of Nietzsche’s “will to power” and a secularized Puritan moralism. In this penetrating study, Mark T. Mitchell explains how this marriage made in hell gave birth to a powerful and destructive political and social movement. Having declared that “God is dead,” Friedrich Nietzsche identified the “will to power” as (...)
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  6. Polanyi and the Role of Tradition in Scientific Inquiry.Mark T. Mitchell - 2011 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 31 (3):206-211.
    A characteristic of the modern mind is a disdain for tradition. Polanyi argues that neglecting the role of tradition leads to philosophical incoherence as well as moral and political chaos. Polanyi’s postcritical philosophy represents an attempt to show how tradition plays a vital role in the process of discovery. Ultimately, a coherent account of the sciences, as well as the humanities, is only possible when tradition is acknowledged as indispensable.
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  7. The Limits of Liberalism: Tradition, Individualism, and the Crisis of Freedom.Mark T. Mitchell - 2018 - Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: surveying the landscape and defining terms -- The seventeenth-century denigration of tradition and a nineteenth-century response -- Michael oakeshott and the epistemic role of tradition -- Alasdair macintyre's tradition-constituted inquiry -- Michael polanyi and role of tacit knowledge -- The incoherence of liberalism and the response of tradition -- Afterword: a conservatism worth conserving, or conservatism as stewardship -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
     
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