18 found
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  1.  28
    Constraints on Analogical Mapping: A Comparison of Three Models.Mark T. Keane, Tim Ledgeway & Stuart Duff - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (3):387-438.
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  2.  85
    Efficient Creativity: Constraint‐Guided Conceptual Combination.Fintan J. Costello & Mark T. Keane - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (2):299-349.
    This paper describes a theory that explains both the creativity and the efficiency of people's conceptual combination. In the constraint theory, conceptual combination is controlled by three constraints of diagnosticity, plausibility, and informativeness. The constraints derive from the pragmatics of communication as applied to compound phrases. The creativity of combination arises because the constraints can be satisfied in many different ways. The constraint theory yields an algorithmic model of the efficiency of combination. The C3 model admits the full creativity of (...)
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  3.  17
    Explaining black-box classifiers using post-hoc explanations-by-example: The effect of explanations and error-rates in XAI user studies.Eoin M. Kenny, Courtney Ford, Molly Quinn & Mark T. Keane - 2021 - Artificial Intelligence 294 (C):103459.
  4.  26
    A Model of Plausibility.Louise Connell & Mark T. Keane - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (1):95-120.
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  5.  24
    Editors’ Introduction and Review: An Appraisal of Surprise: Tracing the Threads That Stitch It Together.Edward L. Munnich, Meadhbh I. Foster & Mark T. Keane - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):37-49.
    This special issue presents developments in research on the cognitive mechanisms and consequences of surprise. Amidst much progress, surprise research has often been siloed, so, as editors, we have sought to juxtapose insights, theories, and findings, to support cross‐fertilization in future research. The present paper sets the stage by presenting a historical summary, highlighting contrasts in definitions, and tracing major threads running through this issue and the larger surprise literature.
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  6.  20
    The Role of Surprise in Learning: Different Surprising Outcomes Affect Memorability Differentially.Meadhbh I. Foster & Mark T. Keane - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):75-87.
    Surprise has been explored as a cognitive-emotional phenomenon that impacts many aspects of mental life from creativity to learning to decision-making. In this paper, we specifically address the role of surprise in learning and memory. Although surprise has been cast as a basic emotion since Darwin's (1872) The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, recently more emphasis has been placed on its cognitive aspects. One such view casts surprise as a process of “sense making” or “explanation finding”: metacognitive (...)
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  7.  40
    Seeing Patterns in Randomness: A Computational Model of Surprise.Phil Maguire, Philippe Moser, Rebecca Maguire & Mark T. Keane - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):103-118.
    Much research has linked surprise to violation of expectations, but it has been less clear how one can be surprised when one has no particular expectation. This paper discusses a computational theory based on Algorithmic Information Theory, which can account for surprises in which one initially expects randomness but then notices a pattern in stimuli. The authors present evidence that a “randomness deficiency” heuristic leads to surprise in such cases.
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  8.  17
    Do we “fear for the worst” or “Hope for the best” in thinking about the unexpected?: Factors affecting the valence of unexpected outcomes reported for everyday scenarios.Molly S. Quinn, Katherine Campbell & Mark T. Keane - 2021 - Cognition 208 (C):104520.
    Though we often “fear the worst”, worrying that unexpectedly bad things will happen, there are times when we “hope for the best”, imagining that unexpectedly good things will happen, too. The paper explores how the valence of the current situation influences people's imagining of unexpected future events when participants were instructed to think of “something unexpected”. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 127) were asked to report unexpected events to everyday scenarios under different instructional conditions (e.g., asked for “good” or (...)
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  9.  20
    Surprise as an ideal case for the interplay of cognition and emotion.Meadhbh I. Foster & Mark T. Keane - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  10. Adaptation-guided retrieval: questioning the similarity assumption in reasoning.Barry Smyth & Mark T. Keane - 1998 - Artificial Intelligence 102 (2):249-293.
  11.  23
    Innovation networks.Petra Ahrweiler & Mark T. Keane - 2013 - Mind and Society 12 (1):73-90.
    This paper advances a framework for modeling the component interactions between cognitive and social aspects of scientific creativity and technological innovation. Specifically, it aims to characterize Innovation Networks; those networks that involve the interplay of people, ideas and organizations to create new, technologically feasible, commercially-realizable products, processes and organizational structures. The tri-partite framework captures networks of ideas (Concept Level), people (Individual Level) and social structures (Social-Organizational Level) and the interactions between these levels. At the concept level, new ideas are the (...)
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  12.  1
    Counterfactual explanations for misclassified images: How human and machine explanations differ.Eoin Delaney, Arjun Pakrashi, Derek Greene & Mark T. Keane - 2023 - Artificial Intelligence 324 (C):103995.
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  13.  19
    Consciousness, analogy and creativity.Mark T. Keane - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):682-682.
  14.  13
    Compositionality and the Pragmatics of Conceptual Combination.Mark T. Keane & Fintan J. Costello - 2005 - In Gerhard Schurz, Edouard Machery & Markus Werning (eds.), Applications to Linguistics, Psychology and Neuroscience. De Gruyter. pp. 203-216.
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  15.  15
    It's distributions all the way down!: Second order changes in statistical distributions also occur.Mark T. Keane & Aaron Gerow - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):87-87.
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  16.  12
    Why the Conjunction Effect Is Rarely a Fallacy: How Learning Influences Uncertainty and the Conjunction Rule.Phil Maguire, Philippe Moser, Rebecca Maguire & Mark T. Keane - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  17. Subject Index to Volume 30.Arthur B. Markman, Thomas T. Hills, Michael P. Kaschak, Jenny R. Saffran, Jarrod Moss, Kenneth Kotovsky, Jonathan Cagan, Louise Connell, Mark T. Keane & Joyca Pw Lacroix - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30:1129-1132.
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  18.  2
    Factors affecting “expectations of the unexpected”: The impact of controllability & valence on unexpected outcomes.Molly S. Quinn & Mark T. Keane - 2022 - Cognition 225 (C):105142.
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