Results for 'Mark R. Littleton'

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  1. Conversations with God the Father: Encounters with One True God.Mark R. Littleton - 1998 - Starburst.
    If you really could have a conversation with God--it might sound like this!
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  2. Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis.Mark R. Wicclair - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historically associated with military service, conscientious objection has become a significant phenomenon in health care. Mark Wicclair offers a comprehensive ethical analysis of conscientious objection in three representative health care professions: medicine, nursing and pharmacy. He critically examines two extreme positions: the 'incompatibility thesis', that it is contrary to the professional obligations of practitioners to refuse provision of any service within the scope of their professional competence; and 'conscience absolutism', that they should be exempted from performing any action contrary (...)
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  3.  70
    Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence‐Based Approaches.Mark R. Tonelli - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):248-256.
    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has thus far failed to adequately account for the appropriate incorporation of other potential warrants for medical decision making into clinical practice. In particular, EBM has struggled with the value and integration of other kinds of medical knowledge, such as those derived from clinical experience or based on pathophysiologic rationale. The general priority given to empirical evidence derived from clinical research in all EBM approaches is not epistemically tenable. A casuistic alternative to EBM approaches recognizes that five (...)
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  4.  58
    A Late and Shifting Foundation: A Commentary on Djulbegovic, B., Guyatt, G. H. & Ashcroft, R. E. (2009) Cancer Control, 16, 158–168. [REVIEW]Mark R. Tonelli - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):907-909.
  5. Handbook of Self and Identity.Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.) - 2003 - Guilford Press.
    This state-of-the-science volume brings together an array of leading authorities to comprehensively review theory and research in this burgeoning area.
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  6.  10
    Renewing the Senses: A Study of the Philosophy and Theology of the Spiritual Life.Mark R. Wynn - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A study of the philosophy and theology of the spiritual life that takes religious sensibility or the practice of religious life, rather simply creedal commitment, as a starting point.
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  7. Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Mark R. Wicclair - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):205–227.
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  8.  41
    Advancing a Casuistic Model of Clinical Decision Making: A Response to Commentators.Mark R. Tonelli - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):504-507.
  9.  43
    Patient Decision-Making Capacity and Risk.Mark R. Wicclair - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (2):91–104.
  10.  61
    The Evolution of the Human Self: Tracing the Natural History of Self‐Awareness.Mark R. Leary & Nicole R. Buttermore - 2003 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):365-404.
    Previous discussions of the evolution of the self have diverged greatly in their estimates of the date at which the capacity for self-thought emerged, the factors that led self-reflection to evolve, and the nature of the evidence offered to support these disparate conclusions. Beginning with the assumption that human self-awareness involves a set of distinct cognitive abilities that evolved at different times to solve different adaptive problems, we trace the evolution of self-awareness from the common ancestor of humans and apes (...)
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  11.  50
    Substituted Judgment in Medical Practice: Evidentiary Standards on a Sliding Scale.Mark R. Tonelli - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):22-29.
    Consensus is growing among ethicists and lawyers that medical decision making for incompetent patients who were previously competent should be made in accordance with that person's prior wishes and desires. Moreover, this legal and ethical preference for the substituted judgment standard has found its way into the daily practice of medicine. However, what appears on the surface to be an agreement between jurists, bioethicists, and clinicians obscures the very real differences between disciplines regarding the actual implementation of the sub stituted (...)
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  12.  9
    Patient Decision‐Making Capacity and Risk.Mark R. Wicclair - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (2):91-104.
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  13.  55
    The Challenge of Evidence in Clinical Medicine.Mark R. Tonelli - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):384-389.
  14.  7
    Person‐Centred Shared Decision Making.Mark R. Tonelli & Mark D. Sullivan - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):1057-1062.
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  15.  36
    The Self as an Organizing Construct in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney - 2003 - In Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.), Handbook of Self and Identity. Guilford Press.
  16.  16
    Mechanisms in Clinical Practice: Use and Justification.Mark R. Tonelli & Jon Williamson - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (1):115-124.
    While the importance of mechanisms in determining causality in medicine is currently the subject of active debate, the role of mechanistic reasoning in clinical practice has received far less attention. In this paper we look at this question in the context of the treatment of a particular individual, and argue that evidence of mechanisms is indeed key to various aspects of clinical practice, including assessing population-level research reports, diagnostic as well as therapeutic decision making, and the assessment of treatment effects. (...)
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  17.  70
    Caring for Frail Elderly Parents: Past Parental Sacrifices and the Obligations of Adult Children.Mark R. Wicclair - 1990 - Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):163-189.
  18.  42
    Concerning Electronegativity as a Basic Elemental Property and Why the Periodic Table is Usually Represented in its Medium Form.Mark R. Leach - 2013 - Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):13-29.
    Electronegativity, described by Linus Pauling described as “The power of an atom in a molecule to attract electrons to itself” (Pauling in The nature of the chemical bond, 3rd edn, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, p 88, 1960), is used to predict bond polarity. There are dozens of methods for empirically quantifying electronegativity including: the original thermochemical technique (Pauling in J Am Chem Soc 54:3570–3582, 1932), numerical averaging of the ionisation potential and electron affinity (Mulliken in J Chem Phys 2:782–784, 1934), (...)
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  19. Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician’s Professional Obligations.Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), internal morality (...)
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  20. Punishment, Compensation, and Law: A Theory of Enforceability.Mark R. Reiff - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of the meaning and measure of enforceability. While we have long debated what restraints should govern the conduct of our social life, we have paid relatively little attention to the question of what it means to make a restraint enforceable. Focusing on the enforceability of legal rights but also addressing the enforceability of moral rights and social conventions, Mark Reiff explains how we use punishment and compensation to make restraints operative in the (...)
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  21.  10
    Conscientious Objection, Moral Integrity, and Professional Obligations.Mark R. Wicclair - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (3):543-559.
    Typically, a refusal to provide a medical service is an instance of conscientious objection only when the medical service is legal, professionally accepted, and clinically appropriate. That is, conscientious objection typically occurs only when practitioners reject prevailing norms or practices. Insofar as refusing to provide antibiotics for a viral infection does not violate prevailing clinical norms, there is no need for the physician in Case 1 to justify his refusal to provide antibiotics by appealing to his conscience.1 By contrast, insofar (...)
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  22. Exploitation and Economic Justice in the Liberal Capitalist State.Mark R. Reiff - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Exploitation and Economic Justice in the Liberal Capitalist State offers the first new, liberal theory of economic justice to appear in more than 30 years. The theory presented is designed to offer an alternative to the most popular liberal egalitarian theories of today and aims to be acceptable to both right and left libertarians too.
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  23. Terrorism, Retribution, and Collective Responsibility.Mark R. Reiff - 2008 - Social Theory and Practice 34 (2):209-242.
    Terrorism is commonly viewed as a form of war, and as a form of war, the morality of terrorism seems to turn on the usual arguments regarding the furtherance of political objectives through coercive means. The terrorist argues that his options for armed struggle are limited, and that the use of force against civilians is the only way he can advance his cause. But this argument is subject to a powerful response. There is the argument from consequences, which asserts that (...)
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  24.  12
    Clinical Judgement in Precision Medicine.Mark R. Tonelli - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (3):646-648.
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  25.  30
    Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions.Mark R. Wicclair - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (3):267-283.
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
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  26. In the Name of Liberty: An Argument for Universal Unionization.Mark R. Reiff - 2020 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    For years now, unionization has been under vigorous attack. Membership has been steadily declining, and with it union bargaining power. As a result, unions may soon lose their ability to protect workers from economic and personal abuse, as well as their significance as a political force. In the Name of Liberty responds to this worrying state of affairs by presenting a new argument for unionization, one that derives an argument for universal unionization in both the private and public sector from (...)
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  27.  7
    Justifying Conscience Clauses.Mark R. Wicclair - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (5):22-25.
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  28.  23
    Errors, Efficiency, and the Interplay Between Attention and Category Learning.Mark R. Blair, Marcus R. Watson & Kimberly M. Meier - 2009 - Cognition 112 (2):330-336.
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  29.  4
    The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine : Timely Philosophy Heralding a Time to Engage with Clinical Medicine.Mark R. Tonelli - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1262-1264.
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  30.  80
    Negative and Positive Claims of Conscience.Mark R. Wicclair - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):14.
    Discussions of appeals to conscience by healthcare professionals typically focus on situations in which they object to providing a legal and professionally permitted service, such as abortion, sterilization, prescribing or dispensing emergency contraception, and organ retrieval pursuant to donation after cardiac death. “Negative claims of conscience” will designate such appeals to conscience. When healthcare professionals advance a negative claim of conscience, they do so to secure an exemption from ethical, professional, institutional, and/or legal obligations or requirements to provide a healthcare (...)
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  31. Punishment in the Executive Suite: Moral Responsibility, Causal Responsibility, and Financial Crime.Mark R. Reiff - 2017 - In Lisa Herzog (ed.), Just Financial Markets? Finance in a Just Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 125-153.
    Despite the enormity of the financial losses flowing from the 2008 financial crisis and the outrageousness of the conduct that led up to it, almost no individual involved has been prosecuted for criminal conduct, much less actually gone to prison. What this chapter argues is that the failure to punish those in management for their role in this misconduct stems from a misunderstanding of the need to prove that they personally knew of this wrongdoing and harbored an intent to defraud. (...)
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  32.  35
    The Continuing Debate Over Risk-Related Standards of Competence.Mark R. Wicclair - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (2):149–153.
  33.  45
    Compellingness: Assessing the Practical Relevance of Clinical Research Results.Mark R. Tonelli - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):962-967.
  34.  85
    Pharmacies, Pharmacists, and Conscientious Objection.Mark R. Wicclair - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (3):225-250.
    : This paper examines the obligations of pharmacy licensees and pharmacists in the context of conscience-based objections to filling lawful prescriptions for certain types of medications—e.g., standard and emergency contraceptives. Claims of conscience are analyzed as means to preserve or maintain an individual's moral integrity. It is argued that pharmacy licensees have an obligation to dispense prescription medications that satisfy the health needs of the populations they serve, and this obligation can override claims of conscience. Although efforts should be made (...)
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  35.  53
    Not a Philosophy of Clinical Medicine: A Commentary on 'The Philosophy of Evidence‐Based Medicine' Howick, J. Ed. (2001).Mark R. Tonelli - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1013-1017.
  36.  2
    Supporting Real-Time Ethical Deliberation in Contingency Capacity During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Mark R. Tonelli & Catherine R. Butler - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):25-27.
    The reality of resource limitation during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic has deeply challenged established approaches to healthcare system emergency response. Early preparation du...
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  37.  64
    Evidence-Free Medicine: Forgoing Evidence in Clinical Decision Making.Mark R. Tonelli - 2009 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):319-331.
  38.  5
    Preventing conscientious objection in medicine from running amok: a defense of reasonable accommodation.Mark R. Wicclair - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):539-564.
    A US Department of Health and Human Services Final Rule, Protecting Statutory Conscience Rights in Health Care, and a proposed bill in the British House of Lords, the Conscientious Objection Bill, may well warrant a concern that—to borrow a phrase Daniel Callahan applied to self-determination—conscientious objection in health care has “run amok.” Insofar as there are no significant constraints or limitations on accommodation, both rules endorse an approach that is aptly designated “conscience absolutism.” There are two common strategies to counter (...)
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  39.  75
    What Medical Futility Means to Clinicians.Mark R. Tonelli - 2007 - HEC Forum 19 (1):83-93.
  40.  42
    Ethics and Research with Deceased Patients.Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):87-97.
    In a provocative 1974 article entitled “Harvesting the Dead,” Willard Gaylin explored potential uses of “neomorts,” or what are currently referred to as “heart-beating cadavers”—that is, humans determined to be dead by neurological criteria and whose cardiopulmonary function is medically maintained by ventilators, vasopressors, and so forth. Medical research was one of the potential uses Gaylin identified. He pointed out that tests of drugs and medical procedures that would have unacceptable health risks if performed on living human subjects could be (...)
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  41.  42
    The Moral Significance of Claims of Conscience in Healthcare.Mark R. Wicclair - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):30 – 31.
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  42. Proportionality, Winner-Take-All, and Distributive Justice.Mark R. Reiff - 2009 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (1):5-42.
    When faced with multiple claims to a particular good, what does distributive justice require? To answer this question, we need a substantive moral theory that will enable us assign relative moral weights to the parties' claims. But this is not all we need. Once we have assessed the moral weight of each party's claim, we still need to decide what method of distribution to employ, for there are two methods open to us. We could take the winner-take-all approach, and award (...)
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  43.  49
    The Pedagogical Value of House, M.D. —Can a Fictional Unethical Physician Be Used to Teach Ethics?Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):16 – 17.
  44.  62
    Informed Consent and Research Involving the Newly Dead.Mark R. Wicclair - 2002 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):351-372.
    : This paper examines informed consent in relation to research involving the newly dead. Reasons are presented for facilitating advance decision making in relation to postmortem research, and it is argued that the informed consent of family members should be sought when the deceased have not made a premortem decision. Regardless of whether the dead can be harmed, there are two important respects in which family consent can serve to protect the dead: (1) protecting the deceased's body from being used (...)
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  45.  45
    The Theme of Health in Nietzsche's Thought.Mark R. Letteri - 1990 - Man and World 23 (4):405-417.
  46.  30
    Reason in Practice: A Unique Role for a ˜Philosophy of Management'.Mark R. Dibben & Stephen Sheard - 2012 - Philosophy of Management 11 (3):1-10.
    The body of work pre s ented in this issue and the next (Volume 12, Issue 1) arose from a question both editors had separately harboured for some years, namely: what role can philosophy play in the practice and conceptualisation of management? Contemporary discourses within the academic discipline of management have tended to err on the side of science, either in the striving for replicative and iterative advancement in the proof-laden establishment of ‘facts’ or, what is worse perhaps, the iterative (...)
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  47.  17
    Fractions We Cannot Ignore: The Nonsymbolic Ratio Congruity Effect.Percival G. Matthews & Mark R. Lewis - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (6):1656-1674.
    Although many researchers theorize that primitive numerosity processing abilities may lay the foundation for whole number concepts, other classes of numbers, like fractions, are sometimes assumed to be inaccessible to primitive architectures. This research presents evidence that the automatic processing of nonsymbolic magnitudes affects processing of symbolic fractions. Participants completed modified Stroop tasks in which they selected the larger of two symbolic fractions while the ratios of the fonts in which the fractions were printed and the overall sizes of the (...)
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  48.  18
    Reason in Practice: A Unique Role for a ‘Philosophy of Management’.Mark R. Dibben & Stephen Sheard - 2012 - Philosophy of Management 11 (3):1-9.
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  49.  83
    The Difference Principle, Rising Inequality, and Supply-Side Economics: How Rawls Got Hijacked by the Right.Mark R. Reiff - 2012 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 13 (2):119.
    Rawls intended the difference principle to be a liberal egalitarian principle of justice. By that I mean he intended it to provide a moral justification for a moderate amount of redistribution of income from the most advantaged members of society to the least. But since the difference principle was introduced, economic inequality has increased dramatically, reaching levels now not seen since just before the Great Depression, levels that Rawls surely would have thought perverse. Many blame this increase on the rise (...)
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  50.  37
    The Abortion Controversy and the Claim That This Body Is Mine.Mark R. Wicclair - 1981 - Social Theory and Practice 7 (3):337-346.
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